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Future of the Cognitive Revolution [NOOK Book]

Overview

In 1990, Jerome Bruner suggested it was time to take stock of what is now referred to as the "cognitive revolution" - not only to reasses its progress, but to review the dominant role artificial intelligence and computers came to play in it. This volume assembles several leading thinkers to address these questions, and many others that stem from them, in an attempt to examine psychology's and cognitive science's success at using computers to understand human mind and behavior. The "cognitive revolution" has, in ...
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Future of the Cognitive Revolution

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Overview

In 1990, Jerome Bruner suggested it was time to take stock of what is now referred to as the "cognitive revolution" - not only to reasses its progress, but to review the dominant role artificial intelligence and computers came to play in it. This volume assembles several leading thinkers to address these questions, and many others that stem from them, in an attempt to examine psychology's and cognitive science's success at using computers to understand human mind and behavior. The "cognitive revolution" has, in many respects, been a watershed in our contemporary struggles to comprehend what is crucially significant about human beings. As a result of intellectual and technological innovations since World War II, theorists now possess a more powerfully insightful model for mind than was available in the past. Can we now save cognitive science's claim that the mind is analogous to computer software, or must we start from the beginning? In Reassessing the Cognitive Revolution, leading scholars from diverse fields of cognitive science - linguistics, psychology, neuropsychology, and philosophy - present their latest, carefully considered judgments about the future of this intellectual movement. Jerome Bruner, Noam Chomsky, Hilary Putnam, and Margaret Boden, among others, have written original chapters in a nontechnical style that can be enjoyed and understood by an interdisciplinary audience of psychologists, philosophers, anthropologists, linguists, and cognitive scientists alike.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195356045
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 4/24/1997
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

York University

Umea University

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Table of Contents

Introduction: What Is the Purpoted Discipline of Cognitive Science and Why Does It Need to Be Reassessed at the Present Moment? The Search for "Cognitive Glue" 3
Pt. 1 Good Old-Fashioned Cognitive Science: Does It Have a Future? 13
1 Language and Cognition 15
2 Functionalism: Cognitive Science or Science Fiction? 32
3 Reassessing the Cognitive Revolution 45
4 Promise and Achievement in Cognitive Science 55
5 Boden's Middle Way: Viable or Not? 68
6 Metasubjective Processes: The Missing Lingua Franca of Cognitive Science 75
7 Is Cognitive Science a Discipline? 102
8 Anatomy of a Revolution 109
Pt. 2 Cognitive Science and the Study of Language 115
9 Language from an Internalist Perspective 118
10 The Novelty of Chomsky's Theories 136
11 But What Have You Done for Us Lately? Some Recent Perspectives on Linguistic Nativism 149
Pt. 3 Connectionism: A Non-Rule-Following Rival, or Supplement to the Traditional Approach? 165
12 From Text to Process: Connectionism's Contribution to the Future of Cognitive Science 169
13 Embodied Connectionism 187
14 Neural Networks and Neuroscience: What Are Connectionist Simulations Good for? 209
15 Can Wittgenstein Help Free the Mind from Rules? The Philosophical Foundations of Connectionism 217
16 The Dynamical Alternative 227
Pt. 4 The Ecological Alternative: Knowledge as Sensitivity to Objectively Existing Facts 245
17 The Future of Cognitive Science: An Ecological Analysis 247
18 The Cognitive Revolution from an Ecological Point of View 261
Pt. 5 Challenges to Cognitive Science: The Cultural Approach 275
19 Will Cognitive Revolutions Ever Stop? 279
20 Neural Cartesianism: Comments on the Epistemology of the Cognitive Sciences 293
21 Language, Action, and Mind 302
22 Cognition as a Social Practice: From Computer Power to Word Power 317
23 "Berkeleyan" Arguments and the Ontology of Cognitive Science 335
Pt. 6 Historical Approaches 353
24 The Mind Considered from a Historical Perspective: Human Cognitive Phylogenesis and the Possibility of Continuing Cognitive Evolution 355
25 Taking the Past Seriously: How History Shows That Eliminativists' Account of Folk Psychology Is Partly Right and Partly Wrong 366
Afterword: Cognitive Science and the Future of Psychology - Challenges and Opportunities 376
Citation Index 383
Subject Index 391
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