The Future of Us

Overview

It's 1996, and Josh and Emma have been neighbors their whole lives. They've been best friends almost as long - at least, up until last November, when Josh did something that changed everything. Things have been weird between them ever since, but when Josh's family gets a free AOL CD in the mail,his mom makes him bring it over so that Emma can install it on her new computer. When they sign on, they're automatically logged onto their Facebook pages. But Facebook hasn't been invented yet. And they're looking at ...
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Overview

It's 1996, and Josh and Emma have been neighbors their whole lives. They've been best friends almost as long - at least, up until last November, when Josh did something that changed everything. Things have been weird between them ever since, but when Josh's family gets a free AOL CD in the mail,his mom makes him bring it over so that Emma can install it on her new computer. When they sign on, they're automatically logged onto their Facebook pages. But Facebook hasn't been invented yet. And they're looking at themselves fifteen years in the future.

By refreshing their pages, they learn that making different decisions now will affect the outcome of their lives later. And as they grapple with the ups and downs of what their futures hold, they're forced to confront what they're doing right - and wrong - in the present.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

This novel about a pair of teens who suddenly receive glimpses into their futures possesses the kind of resonance that all too many novels attempt but cannot achieve. The Future of Us is a fiction that repeatedly brings us back to the present, to the choices that we don't even know that we're making.

Benjamin Ruby

Publishers Weekly
With collaborators like these, readers expect an ingenious hook, compelling characters, and thought-provoking content, and these two top-of-their-game authors don’t disappoint. It’s 1996, and high school junior Emma and her neighbor Josh are BFFs until an awkward, romantic moment creates tension. Then Emma gets a new computer and an AOL CD-ROM, which somehow allow her to access her future Facebook page when she goes online. She and Josh are able to read about what their lives will be like in 15 years, but what’s more, they discover that they can affect those future lives by their thoughts and actions in the present, a sobering realization with far-reaching consequences for the teenagers. Asher and Mackler’s concept is fascinating—how closely today is tied to tomorrow—and the alternating voices of the two main characters keep each chapter fresh and provide distinct perspectives on the events of the story. Though readers will not necessarily be surprised by how things turn out, the enjoyment—and the underlying message—is in simply allowing the journey to unfold. Ages 12–up. (Nov.)
VOYA - Nancy Wallace
In the spring of 1996, Emma installs AOL on her new computer from a free CD borrowed from her neighbor Josh. She has no idea that the one thousand hours of free Internet will allow her to tap into the future. When Facebook pops up on her sidebar, Emma glimpses what she will be like in fifteen years. Faced with a lonely, unhappy future, she tries to alter the current direction of her life. But she and Josh discover that even tiny changes in the present have huge ramifications later on. Their window into the future drives them apart and then brings them closer together in ways they could never have imagined. The authors' technique of telling the story in alternating chapters, one from Josh's point of view and one from Emma's, is very effective in defining both the characters and their voices. The premise is fresh, the characters are believable, and the plot zips along. Emma's casual love affairs with high school boys take on a more serious note when she sees herself alone and unloved in the future. While readers may guess that Emma needs to look no further for true love than "the boy next door," her journey to self-realization is authentic and touching. Teens will have no trouble identifying with Emma and Josh and their circle of friends. This book will appeal to a wide range of readers. It is a good choice for both public and school libraries, as well as a great selection for book discussions. Reviewer: Nancy Wallace
VOYA - Mary Kusluch
This honest, remarkable book offers a fictional situation realistically. Emma and Josh learn from their mistakes: they are humanized by the fact that they make them. They learn that sometimes what you need most has been right beside you all along. Written in first person / present tense, the book allows readers to see through the eyes of each character. Teens will enjoy reading about the smooth pages of someone's life suddenly wrinkled by a strange and supernatural occurrence. 4Q, 4P. Reviewer: Mary Kusluch, Teen Reviewer
ALAN Review - Meghan Anderson
Set in 1996, Josh and Emma are not the constantly wired teenagers of today. Josh has just given Emma a free AOL trial cd rom for her new computer. Upon logging on, Emma sees a page that has all her personal information and pictures. Emma has stumbled onto herself 15 years in the future, on Facebook. Josh is there, too, but their profiles do not remain static, rather the smallest actions throughout their days cause ripples in time, where their Facebook profiles and subsequently their futures change with every click. This novel not only examines how we write our destinies, but also to what extent our future is written in technology. Asher and Mackler's compelling depictions force the reader to examine the simultaneous help and hindrance that lies in current technology, keeping the reader guessing about the future of Emma and Josh as well at the future of humanity. Reviewer: Meghan Anderson
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—The year is 1996. Josh and Emma, lifelong best friends and neighbors, are in the midst of sorting out their awkward, possibly romantic feelings for one another when Emma receives her first computer and logs on to the Internet with a free AOL CD. Mysteriously, the teens find themselves on a website called Facebook, which has all sorts of information about their lives… 15 years in the future. This intriguing premise is an instant hook for today's social-media-savvy readers. Clever references to cassette tapes, dial-up Internet access, and camera film are sure to induce chuckles from those who remember 1996, but the nostalgia is subtle enough that the writing will feel fresh to contemporary teens, and the idea of glimpsing one's future is a tantalizing draw for any reader. Although the discovery of Facebook initially propels the plot, there is a solid and appealing story beyond the sly humor that comes from poking fun at trivial status updates. In addition to sustaining well-crafted romantic tension, the authors deftly address universal questions relevant to teens, such as, "What do I want?" and "How do my actions affect my future?" As Josh and Emma confront these dilemmas and reevaluate their feelings, their alternating first-person narratives have a sense of urgency that makes this book impossible to set aside. This quick, highly engaging read is a tremendously likable, soul-searching romantic comedy and a subtle reminder to occasionally unplug and live in the moment.—Allison Tran, Mission Viejo Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
If you had the chance to see what your life would be like 15 years in the future, would you take it? High-school students Emma Nelson and Josh Templeton were best friends until a misguided kiss last November made things between them awkward at best. But when Josh's mother forces him to give Emma a CD-ROM for America Online, the two discover that, for better or for worse, their destinies are intertwined. While installing the CD, Emma stumbles upon her Facebook page. The problem is, it's 1996. Facebook hasn't been invented yet. Emma shares her secret with Josh, and the two quickly learn that everything they do in the present has an immediate impact on their lives in the future. Unfortunately, they don't always like what they see. Can the two teenagers rewrite the future? Should they try? Asher (Thirteen Reasons Why, 2007) and Mackler's (Tangled, 2010) fantasy, told from both Emma and Josh's perspectives, makes for an entertaining but ultimately disappointing read. Focusing almost entirely on the teens' future love lives, the authors neglect 1996-era subplots involving the teens' friends and families that might have given the story additional depth and immediacy. Without question a page-turner, it's nevertheless unlikely to linger long in readers' minds. (Fantasy. 13 & up)
Dan Kois
The real value of The Future of Us may lie less in its plot than in the rich crop of questions it will raise in teenage readers…Reading the book should get contemporary teenagers wondering: Where will I live 15 years from now? Whom will I marry? What kind of life can I dream of? And what, exactly, is a "CD-ROM"? Prepare yourselves, parents, for the disbelief that will follow explanations of such historic artifacts as dial-up Internet, the Disc­man and busy signals.
—The New York Times Book Review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781595144911
  • Publisher: Razorbill
  • Publication date: 11/21/2011
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 193,969
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.76 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Jay Asher's first novel, Thirteen Reasons Why, spent over a year on the New York Times bestseller list, with foreign rights sold in over 30 countries and more than 1,000,000 copies in print in the US alone. Visit his website at www.jayasher.blogspot.com and follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/jayasherguy.

Carolyn Mackler (www.carolynmackler.com) is the author of the teen novels The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big Round Things (A Michael L. Printz Honor Book), Tangled, Guyaholic, Vegan Virgin Valentine, and Love and Other Four-Letter Words. In 2008, Carolyn was a judge for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature. She lives in New York City with her husband and two young sons.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 58 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 29, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Fast Read, But Cliched At Times

    In the age of Facebook and smartphones, it's almost difficult to remember a time when every American household didn't have at least one computer. But that's exactly the life that Emma and Josh live. 1996 was the year of Toy Story, but for these two used to be best friends, now awkward moment neighbors, 96' is the year they discover their future selves; all thanks to AOL and the appearance of a website with profiles that very much resemble themselves and people they know.

    As far as the premise goes, The Future of Us had me sold. Back that with talented authors Jay Asher and Carolyn Mackler, and I was more than eager for this book. I'm happy to say that the book had all the aspects I had looked forward to, but it didn't blow me away.

    Emma can be quite whiny and annoying at times, complaining that she has to change what she believes is a horrible, unhappy future, and all based on her future self's random postings. In 200 characters or so, Emma decides that her future sucks, but since she's still in 1996, she can change that. And does so more than willingly.

    Josh, on the other hand, is much more wary of changing the future on purpose. He's laid-back and more level-headed than Emma. He also has that pining away for a girl who doesn't want him thing down pat. Readers will like him and feel for him. I know I did.

    The Future of Us is a fast read, with short chapters that alternate between Emma's and Josh's POV. At times, it tries too hard to be 90's and it never manages to actually do that. Still, it's fun to see Emma's utter confusion about what Harry Potter is and why it's one of her favorite books, as well as her future self's excitement over a night of Netflix and Glee. If you're looking for a quick read that will entertain you, The Future of Us is sure to do just that.

    37 out of 44 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 26, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    great

    Totally loved it. It has a story that kept me turning pages.

    14 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 18, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great, futuristic, tale!

    I received this book in the mail about a week ago (without my knowledge!), and I'm so glad I did! I don't think I would have picked up this book on my own, which would have been a shame because it was so endearing! The story is over the course of only one week, but it's definitely enough time for you to learn a lot about the characters and enjoy the story. The whole thing is written from altering perspectives between Josh and Emma (Emma Nelson, which made me think of Degrassi!!), and I really like it when authors do that because then you get both sides of the story. It was a great way to get me to fall madly in love with both characters.

    At first, I wasn't a big fan of Emma. She doesn't really appreciate anything she has, and she's kind of a whiney brat, but she really grows throughout the story. I loved watching Emma grow and develop and sort of find herself and appreciate what's directly in front of her, rather than always wanting more. And Josh. Oh Josh. He's such a kind guy, he's totally crush worthy! I pictured him as the tall, somewhat dorky, skater kid who gets overlooked by a lot of girls, but is such a sweetie he made my heart melt.

    The plot itself is really interesting as well, the idea of finding yourself on Facebook in 15 years and learning about your future self through status updates was a really cool aspect. And all the different things they go to to try and change their futures, or keep them the same, are great to read about. Emma's not happy about her future husband so she decides she'll never meet him. Josh loves that he'll marry the hottest chick at school so he tries as hard as he can to hold on to her in the present. Eventually they learn more about themselves in the present then they ever could, knowing the future.

    Overall, I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves a little romantic, realistic fiction. The characters go through a lot of real life dilemmas (albeit in a weird time travelish way), and I think anyone (boy or girl) could relate to the story. I really enjoyed reading this, it was quick, fun, thought-provoking, and I even teared up a bit! Go check this one out as soon as you can!

    10 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 26, 2011

    Definately Recommended

    If you read and liked 13 Reasons Why by Jay Asther then you will definately love this!

    7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 3, 2012

    Hmm..

    It was an okay, easy read. But I kept waiting for something big to happen that would change everything, but that never came. Its definitely a library book, dont buy it.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

    Highly Recommended!

    Amazing story and fantastic plot. It's now on my shelf waiting to be read over and over agian. Truly awesome!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 7, 2012

    From previously reading "13 Reasons Why", I was more t

    From previously reading "13 Reasons Why", I was more than excited to start this book. Jay Asher and Carolyn Macklers writing styles paired perfectly together to make for an amazing read. I highly recommend this book to anyone. I was able to finish it in 2 DAYS! The book kept me turning the pages and wanting more and more. It was hard to not fall in love with the characters and story line.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 13, 2012

    A must-read

    Really 3.5 stars

    After reading Thirteen Reasons Why, I was especially excited to read this book. Add to that the fact that this book is set in the 1990s and involved Facebook, and I knew it was a must-read.

    When Emma loads her AOL CD onto her computer, she has no idea that she will get a glimpse into her future. But that's exactly what she sees - her Facebook page in fifteen years. Together she and Josh, her neighbor who gave her the CD, are lost in the world of Facebook, learning about their futures as well as their friends' futures. Only their futures constantly change based on even the smallest decisions. As Emma struggles to make her future exactly perfect, Josh struggles with his feelings for Emma. However, Emma soon comes to learn that some things about the future she is better off not knowing...because once she does, how can she change them?

    This book has such an intriguing premise, and it was very well executed. Haven't we all wished that we could see what our future holds? I loved seeing how little decisions could affect status updates and bigger decisions could change the course of their lives. Reading this book certainly makes you think about how little decisions impact your life. Beyond that, one of my favorite things about this book was the time setting. I loved revisiting the 90s - reading this book was like a trip down memory lane. I also enjoyed the alternating points of views in this novel; they allowed me to feel connected to both of the characters, and I cared about both of them. Emma especially had a lot of growth as a character. Aside from seeing into the future, everything about this book was very realistic and it made for a very enjoyable read.

    Although the 90s references may not matter much to current teens, there are still many aspects of this book that would be appealing. Occasionally the plot moved a bit slowly with emphasis on Emma trying to figure out her life. While I enjoyed some of these moments, at times I just wanted to know what would happen next. With that, I would also love to know what really does happen for these characters fifteen years down the road.

    Once again, Jay Asher, along with Carolyn Mackler, has written a novel that carries a great message about how choices impact your life. I will look forward to reading more from both of these authors in the future!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 1, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Predictable and Disappointing

    After reading Thirteen Reasons Why a few weeks ago, I was excited to get my hands on Asher's next novel. Unfortunately, I was quite disappointed. everything that made TRW great is lacking from this book. The authors seem to work really hard to show what 1996 is like without ever really showing what it was like, and Emma's realization that Facebook is the future comes out of nowhere. So much never seemed to connect. Hopefully Asher's next attempt will be better and he won't turn out to be a one hit wonder.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 24, 2012

    I would not recommend fro anyone over the age of fourteen. It is

    I would not recommend fro anyone over the age of fourteen. It is too easy. Not a bad book, but a cliche teenage love story. However, I would not recommend it for anyone under the age of twelve because of some mature content.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 29, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    So with having a facebook, I am able to talk to my friends, see

    So with having a facebook, I am able to talk to my friends, see what's going on with school and work and even post comments. So cool right! Well what if I had the opportunity to refresh my page and see my future life. Wicked! I would probably think I am taking some kind of hallucination drug or think I might be going crazy.

    I loved the characters, even though some of their choices were not the smartest. Seeing them grow up I think was the greatest thing of this book. We were able to see them make mistakes, that most teenagers make, but we also saw the maturity that grew out of them as the book progressed.

    The love interest was there and of course there is going to be a little twist but by the end the characters end with the people we all prayed for it to happen. This is where some of the main mistakes happened in but they realized their mistakes and went forward with their feelings out front.

    Even though I wasn't with AOL for all my childhood years, I can still relate to this book and I believe that anyone who did have AOL can too. So I still recommend that everyone give this book a chance and see where it goes for you!

    I give this book 4 souls!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2012

    if u liked thirteen reasons why then you'll love thsi book!. i l

    if u liked thirteen reasons why then you'll love thsi book!. i loved the way jay went from two different point of views. overall a great read!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 9, 2012

    I think this book is so good, but it's addicting and i finished

    I think this book is so good, but it's addicting and i finished in one night. You could think thats good, but I had to wake up super early that morning with very little sleep. It is the best book I think i've read so far this year.

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  • Posted May 20, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Emma is the main charachter and she loads a new CD thing onto he

    Emma is the main charachter and she loads a new CD thing onto her computer. She had no clue that she's logging into her future. When she logs on, she sees her Facebook page the way it would be in fifteen years. She and her neighbor who gave her the CD, Josh, get involved in the world of Facebook. They learn about their futures as well as their friends futures. They find out that their futures change at the slightest moves they make. Emma tried to make her future exactly perfect but Josh tried to control his feelings for Emma. But eventually Emma realizes she doesn't want to know anymore, because once she knows, how would she change it?

    I think the book was good and it was pretty interesting. I liked to see how the little decisions they made could change their status updates and their big decisions could change the whole entire course of their lives. The book makes you think a lot about your own life a lot. It was really realistic and detailed. I liked it a lot and all the charachters in it. At times, it went a little slow at times, but sometimes that was a good thing. I recomend it to most teenagers who like fate and romance.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2012

    I like the idea of the book. Quite interesting. However I don't

    I like the idea of the book. Quite interesting. However I don't believe that the story was able to reach my expectations. The conflict between Emma and Josh was quite bland. There was very little development. Also, Emma can be quite an annoying character. Overall, the book itself isn't terrible. I would compare reading this book to watching a lame episode of your favorite series. If you read 13 Reasons Why and you're interested in this book, go ahead and read it.

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  • Posted May 8, 2012

    The Future of Us is a funny story of two teens who accidentally

    The Future of Us is a funny story of two teens who accidentally stumble upon their future while browsing this new-fangled thing called the internet. The plot drives the story forward, and readers will constantly be guessing what's happening next. You'll laugh at the comparison of 1996 to 2011, and take away a great message. I'd definitely recommend this to anyone who likes contemporary fiction with a humorous slant.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2012

    SO CUTE! LOVED IT!

    This book was so cute! I loved it. I couldn't put it down. It was different than the books I normally read :)

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  • Posted April 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Pretty good, considering my experiences with these authors. Thou

    Pretty good, considering my experiences with these authors. Though the middle was somewhat irritating, the ending was good

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  • Posted April 27, 2012

    This story kept me reading until the late hours of the night. Th

    This story kept me reading until the late hours of the night. The pace is good and the anticipation of what the main characters will see next as their futures was a fun aspect. The reason I've only given it three stars is because there was really no conclusion at the end. You don't ever actually find out what the characters' futures become, which I kind of thought was the whole point of the book. In my opinion, there should have been an epilogue showing the characters' future Facebook pages. But, all in all, it was still a good read.

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  • Posted April 25, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    I saw this book and it instantly looked interesting. I totally

    I saw this book and it instantly looked interesting. I totally LOVED "Thirteen Reasons Why" by this author, so I wanted to read more. I'm so glad that I did.

    This is a quick read, but interesting on how Emma and Josh wanted to deal with what they found out. I personally remember getting my AOL cd rom and installing it on my computer. How amazing it would have been to get a peek into your future.


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