Futurecare: New Directions in Planning Health and Care Environments / Edition 1

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Overview

Health care in the developed world is in the throws of radical change. Primary health care is having to become more cost effective, large scale hospitals may become a thing of the past and the increasing needs of a growing population will need to be catered for. These are just a few of the issues. Health and care planners, together with architects and designers, need to ensure that what they plan for today will not be redundant in the near future. This book looks at development and design needs across the whole range of health and care facilities.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Reviewer: Donald L. Madison, MD (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill School of Medicine)
Description: This book, edited by two British architects, contains contributions from 16 facilities planners and healthcare administrators (from a variety of health professional backgrounds) from the U.K. and the U.S.
Purpose: The purpose is to envision the "future healthcare landscape." Although this is a futurist discussion, which inevitably must deal with healthcare organization, the treatment of organizational issues is superficial and tends toward the obvious; the emphasis (and strongest part of the book) is on the physical environment for service, not its organization. "Future Landscape" as used here is not a metaphor.
Audience: The audience would include architects and administrators/planners.
Features: A few of the book's 19 chapters address general topics briefly and superficially: "Healthcare Reform and Change," "The Impact of Technology," "Primary Care," etc. The book's focus, however, is on the physical environment for healthcare. There are chapters on "Senior Day Care," "Life Care," "Assisted Living," and on long-term care, nursing homes, facilities for patients with dementia, in-patient hospice care, as well as more general discussions of "Patient-Focused Design," "The Healing Environment," and "Reusing Existing Buildings." Many of these topics are illustrated by photographs and architectural schematics.
Assessment: The connection of physical space and service organization is clearly the book's strength. Yet, it could also be its weakness, because many administrators will wish for a more intelligent discussion of the organizational side, and architects may well find similar fault with its elementary treatment of design issues.
Donald L. Madison
This book, edited by two British architects, contains contributions from 16 facilities planners and healthcare administrators (from a variety of health professional backgrounds) from the U.K. and the U.S. The purpose is to envision the ""future healthcare landscape."" Although this is a futurist discussion, which inevitably must deal with healthcare organization, the treatment of organizational issues is superficial and tends toward the obvious; the emphasis (and strongest part of the book) is on the physical environment for service, not its organization. ""Future Landscape"" as used here is not a metaphor. The audience would include architects and administrators/planners. A few of the book's 19 chapters address general topics briefly and superficially: ""Healthcare Reform and Change,"" ""The Impact of Technology,"" ""Primary Care,"" etc. The book's focus, however, is on the physical environment for healthcare. There are chapters on ""Senior Day Care,"" ""Life Care,"" ""Assisted Living,"" and on long-term care, nursing homes, facilities for patients with dementia, in-patient hospice care, as well as more general discussions of ""Patient-Focused Design,"" ""The Healing Environment,"" and ""Reusing Existing Buildings."" Many of these topics are illustrated by photographs and architectural schematics. The connection of physical space and service organization is clearly the book's strength. Yet, it could also be its weakness, because many administrators will wish for a more intelligent discussion of the organizational side, and architects may well find similar fault with its elementary treatment of design issues.
Booknews
A description of new architectural directions in health care program facilities and assisted living residences, identifying the core changes in health care delivery expected in the future and the design needs which those changes will require. The 16 essays written by architects, doctors, and facilities managers target the impacts of healthcare reform, technology, community care in the UK, and the more particular issue of creating buildings which humanely and efficiently accommodate requirements for long term care, senior day care, assisted living, nursing homes, dementia care, and hospice care. The design descriptions and outlines are patient focused, and sometimes involve reusing existing buildings. Includes illustrations and some photographs. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

2 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780632035779
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/10/1996
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 188
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Meet the Author

Martin S. Valins BA(Hons), DipArch., RIBA, a founding Director of Care Design Group, London, UK, is Director of Research at Reese Lower Patrick & Scott Architects Ltd, Pennsylvania, USA. Derek Salter DipArch. (Oxford), RIBA, is a founding Director of Care Design Group, London and Director of Salmon Speed Architects, London, UK.

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Table of Contents

Preface; Acknowledgements; Looking back; Healthcare reform and change; The impact of technology; Primary care; Community care in the United Kingdom; Outcomes in the environment - long term care; Senior day care; Life care - looking back today, future programming; Close care and assisted living; Long-term care - a residential environment that is striving to be a home; Nursing Home 2000; Dementia care; The in-patient hospice - theory and case study; Sub acute care; Acute care; Patient-focused design; The healing environment; Re-using existing buildings; Towards a conclusion; Additional Reading; Directory of Contributors; Index

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