G is for One Gzonk!: An Alpha-Number-Bet Book
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G is for One Gzonk!: An Alpha-Number-Bet Book

by Tony DiTerlizzi
     
 

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Welcome to my silly dilly
take on ABC
It's lots of fun and really odd,
as you will quickly see

For they're no "leaping lizards" here
No "bears that bounce a ball"
In fact, these zany critters have
never been seen at all!

So turn the page and cast a gaze
on this menagerie,
but don't forget the beasts within
were all made up by

Overview

Welcome to my silly dilly
take on ABC
It's lots of fun and really odd,
as you will quickly see

For they're no "leaping lizards" here
No "bears that bounce a ball"
In fact, these zany critters have
never been seen at all!

So turn the page and cast a gaze
on this menagerie,
but don't forget the beasts within
were all made up by me!

— Tiny DiTerlooney

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
DiTerlizzi (The Spider and the Fly) cleverly concocts new words for each letter of the alphabet in his romp of a read, sure to titillate readers' senses with its silly sounds. His alter ego Tiny DiTerlooney is along for the ride, likening this lesson to a visit to the theatre more than a day at school ("So say good-bye to boring books/ where `bears can bounce a ball,'/ and turn the page;/ I've set the stage,/ and nothing makes sense at all"). The narrative sends up dated elementary school primers: the text features pristinely printed upper and lowercase letters at the top of each page and the featured creature (e.g., an Angry Ack) in bold type but the spread gives way to off-the-wall illustrations, coupled with inventive vocabulary and wry handprinted commentary ("Acks are generally the color red. The word `red' has nothing to do with the letter A"). "Dinkalicious Dinky" and the two-headed "Neenel-Nonnel" bring to mind Dr. Seuss, as do the whimsical images of the "creachlings" in a design reminiscent of 1950s picture books (DiTerlizzi fans will recognize the pink star of Ted as the "Hungry Hoofle-Foofle"). Things go a bit awry when the Ravenous Rotoid crashes into the line-up after Large Licky Lickins, and by the time readers reach the letter P, they may not even realize the subtly inserted counting games. While this book may not expand readers' skill sets, it could easily ignite a love of learning. Ages 4-7. (Sept.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Jennie DeGenaro
Each letter is illustrated by an imaginary animal thought up by DiTerlizzi. He suggests counting the letters and explains there are nineteen consonants and seven vowels. Children will not learn the alphabet by having this book read to them. They will, however, develop an appreciation of the English language, humor, and the thought that words and animals can be a product of one's mind. For example, the author illustrates the letter "E" with an Evil Eeog, accompanied by a rhyming page of four lines describing the creature. Children will enjoy this humorous book and be amused by the funny illustrations.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-This clever and sophisticated tribute to two icons of nonsensical rhyme, Dr. Seuss and Edward Lear, will surprise and amuse. From the "Angry Ack" who eats dirty clothes to the "Zanderiffic Zibble Zook," who loves to read dictionaries, these fantastic creatures defy expectations. The Bloobytack, who collects objects on his sticky back, assures, "I know what you're thinking, but that's not a BOOT, it's a SHOE so no B's here." In fact, none of the illustrations seem to have anything to do with their respective letters. Each spread features a letter, a corresponding Seuss-like "creachling" and its rhyme, and a comical cartoon portrait of the author. Several pages into the story, the Teedle-Weenie Woo, potatolike, brightly colored digits, join the fun. They insist on counting, be it "7 stars," "90 laps," or, in the case of the "Uggle-Unk," "3 stripes in his underwear./Thank goodness, none are brown." Amid the laughs, children are ingeniously exposed to colors, numbers, and letters. The pen-and-ink illustrations of the creachlings are colored digitally, each in a different hue, in imitation of picture books of the '40s and '50s. The author and the Woos are painted in gouache with prismacolor-pencil details. The former-skinny and boyish with jeans, yellow T-shirt, sneakers, round glasses, and unruly red hair-imitates and interacts with his creations on every page, clearly having just as much fun as his readers. Handsomely designed, this wacky wonder will wow Woos of all ages.-Barbara Auerbach, New York City Public Schools Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In memorable homage to his dedicatees Dr. Seuss and Edward Lear, DiTerlizzi introduces an unruly alphabet of imaginary "creachlings," colored in flat hues to evoke the printing processes of the previous century's middle decades and described in sprightly verse. Bidding readers, "say good-bye to boring books / where 'bears can bounce a ball,' " the author, who portrays himself in the pictures as an owlish lad wielding a paintbrush, starts out conventionally enough-"A is for an Angry Ack. / He eats your dirty clothes. / His favorite snack is stinky socks / with jam packed in the toes." Soon, however, he finds himself struggling with entries that wander in out of order, thanks to a multiplying coterie of floating, beanlike "Teedle-Weenie Woo" that, being numbers rather than letters, make a bid to hijack the whole project. Ultimately, he comes to an accommodation with the interlopers, but his effort to kick off a "123" after reaching the "Zanderiffic Zibble Zook" takes an ominous turn when Ack and company pop back into view. Fans of If I Ran the Zoo (1950), or silly alphabets in general, will delight in tracking the burgeoning chaos while trying to wrap their tongues around the droll monikers of this manic menagerie. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689852909
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
09/12/2006
Pages:
80
Product dimensions:
9.50(w) x 12.10(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Tony DiTerlizzi is a New York Times bestselling author and illustrator who has been creating books with Simon & Schuster for more than a decade. From his fanciful picture books like Jimmy Zangwow’s Out-of-this-World Moon Pie Adventure, Adventure of Meno (with his wife, Angela), and The Spider & The Fly (a Caldecott Honor book), to chapter books like Kenny and The Dragon and The Search for WondLa, Tony always imbues his stories with a rich imagination. His middle grade series, The Spiderwick Chronicles (with Holly Black), has sold millions of copies, been adapted into a feature film, and has been translated in more than thirty countries. You can visit him at DiTerlizzi.com.

Tony DiTerlizzi is a New York Times bestselling author and illustrator who has been creating books with Simon & Schuster for more than a decade. From his fanciful picture books like Jimmy Zangwow’s Out-of-this-World Moon Pie Adventure, Adventure of Meno (with his wife, Angela), and The Spider & The Fly (a Caldecott Honor book), to chapter books like Kenny and The Dragon and The Search for WondLa, Tony always imbues his stories with a rich imagination. His middle grade series, The Spiderwick Chronicles (with Holly Black), has sold millions of copies, been adapted into a feature film, and has been translated in more than thirty countries. You can visit him at DiTerlizzi.com.

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