Galatea [NOOK Book]

Overview

In Ancient Greece, a skilled marble sculptor has been blessed by a goddess who has given his masterpiece – the most beautiful woman the town has ever seen – the gift of life. Now his wife, Galatea is expected to be obedience and humility personified, but it is not long before she learns to use her beauty as a form of manipulation. In a desperate bid by her obsessive husband to keep her under control, she is locked away under the constant supervision of doctors and nurses. But with a daughter to rescue, she is ...

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Galatea

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Overview

In Ancient Greece, a skilled marble sculptor has been blessed by a goddess who has given his masterpiece – the most beautiful woman the town has ever seen – the gift of life. Now his wife, Galatea is expected to be obedience and humility personified, but it is not long before she learns to use her beauty as a form of manipulation. In a desperate bid by her obsessive husband to keep her under control, she is locked away under the constant supervision of doctors and nurses. But with a daughter to rescue, she is determined to break free, whatever the cost...

Pygmalion's story has moved millions through the centuries, inspiring George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion, and later the beloved musical My Fair Lady.  Ecco is proud to publish Orange Prize-winning author Madeline Miller’s E-book original short story Galatea which will appear in the forthcoming anthology xo Orpheus: Fifty New Myths to be published in October. This retelling of the Pygmalion myth from the statue’s perspective is a tale that will make readers rethink how they relate to the great myths of our time.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
It’s lovely to see Miller back after her triumphant and critically acclaimed Orange Prize–winning Song of Achilles, even though it’s only in short story form. For those familiar with the Greek myth of the sculptor Pygmalian and his obsession with his own artistic creation, the foundation of this work will come as no surprise. As the story goes, Pygmalian fell so deeply in love with his beautiful statue he clothed her, brought her gifts of jewels and flowers, and, finally, prayed to Aphrodite to give him a woman just like Galatea (which means sleeping love). Instead, Aphrodite brought the statue to life, and they lived happily ever after. Or did they? In Miller’s retelling, true love turns sour and poor Galatea has been confined to a hospital where her husband visits her occasionally for conjugal relations, insisting that she pretend to be the statue she once was until he chooses to wake her with sex.

Verdict Many Greek myths end tragically. Miller explores this theme in an e-original story that will invite readers to return again and again. This would be a perfect high school or college assignment for those studying the classics. [This story will also be published in the forthcoming print anthology xo Orpheus: Fifty New Myths, edited by Kate Bernheimer (Penguin, Oct.).—Ed.]—Jane Henriksen Baird, Anchorage P.L., AK
(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062319654
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/13/2013
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 100
  • Sales rank: 351,441
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Madeline Miller grew up in Philadelphia, has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Latin and Ancient Greek from Brown University, and has been teaching both languages for the past nine years. She has also studied at the Yale School of Drama, specializing in adapting classical tales for a modern audience. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Song of Achilles is her first novel.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 30, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This story is typicall Miller greatness, but do not be fooled by

    This story is typicall Miller greatness, but do not be fooled by the marketing. What's said to be 100 pages is actually 30-some-odd Nook pages, and only 16 of those are actual "Galatea" story. The rest is a preview of The Song of Achilles. Very disappointed in the marketing of this short story.  

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 24, 2015

    more from this reviewer

    I¿m not familiar with the mythology surrounding Galatea, but I a

    I’m not familiar with the mythology surrounding Galatea, but I am familiar with Madeline Miller’s writing. I knew from reading The Song of Achilles that Miller’s writing alone would be enough to make this story worth reading.

    Because, as I said, I don’t know much about the myth that’s being re-imagined, I can’t comment too much on the liberties the author took. What I can comment on is that Miller’s writing drew me in from the beginning. It’s such a well-written and intriguing story to dive into. The narration by Galatea really made this what it is. We get information from her at just the right pace and the right time, letting the situation she’s living in unfold around us. She’s a woman carved from stone, and turned into a real woman. She’s a mother longing to see her daughter again. And a wife with a controlling and demanding husband…a husband who created her for his pleasure.

    I won’t get into the plot more than that, or the different characters. I think I enjoyed going into this story not knowing that much.

    Even though it was only a short story, it’s made me want to read more from Miller, the way I felt after reading The Song of Achilles last year. I’m hoping there’s more out there to discover, soon. There’s something enchanting about the reading experience.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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