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The Gallery
     

The Gallery

4.0 1
by John Horne Burns, Paul Fussell (Introduction)
 

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"The first book of real magnitude to come out of the last war." —John Dos Passos

John Horne Burns brought The Gallery back from World War II, and on publication in 1947 it became a critically-acclaimed bestseller. However, Burns's early death at the age of 36 led to the subsequent neglect of this searching book, which captures the shock the war dealt

Overview

"The first book of real magnitude to come out of the last war." —John Dos Passos

John Horne Burns brought The Gallery back from World War II, and on publication in 1947 it became a critically-acclaimed bestseller. However, Burns's early death at the age of 36 led to the subsequent neglect of this searching book, which captures the shock the war dealt to the preconceptions and ideals of the victorious Americans.

Set in occupied Naples in 1944, The Gallery takes its name from the Galleria Umberto, a bombed-out arcade where everybody in town comes together in pursuit of food, drink, sex, money, and oblivion. A daring and enduring novel—one of the first to look directly at gay life in the military—The Gallery poignantly conveys the mixed feelings of the men and women who fought the war that made America a superpower.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A book by an ex—soldier that deals with the Americans in Itlay and that displays unmistakable talent…Mr. Burns shows the novelist’s specific gift in a brilliant way." — Edmund Wilson

"Burns has a brilliant facility for reproducing the sights, sounds, color, feel, and smell of the places he has seen. He uses this to startling effect to recapture what many Americans beyond the frontiers of their antiseptic homeland for the first time found in exotic and warped war centers as Casablanca, Fedhala, Algiers, and of course the twisted and diseased Napoli itself." — William Hogan, San Francisco Chronicle

"An important novel of our time." — William McFee, New York Sun

"No one will ever forget this book: a story torn from impassioned experience of modern wars in a shattered city of the ancient world. The Gallery is unique, unsparing, immediate; inextinguishable." — Shirley Hazzard

“Burns’s novel…captures the peculiar moral putrefaction military occupation breeds.” —Roy Scranton, Lit Hub

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590170809
Publisher:
New York Review Books
Publication date:
02/15/2004
Series:
NYRB Classics Series
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
576,321
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.99(h) x 0.96(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

John Horne Burns (1916-1953) attended Andover and Harvard and then served in military intelligence during World War II. He wrote two more novels after The GalleryLucifer With a Book and A Cry of Children—but both met with a cold critical reception. He drank himself to death in Florence while still in his thirties.

Paul Fussell
(1924–2012) was the author of many books on war and twentieth-century culture, including The Great War and Modern Memory, which won the National Book Award. His memoir Doing Battle: The Making of a Skeptic chronicles the time he spent fighting with the 103rd infantry division in World War II.

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The Gallery 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Basil More than 1 year ago
After some 65 years, it still can be safely said that there is no more distinguished novel of World War II than "The Gallery." Its characters are memorable beyond belief--especially those Italians who inhabit the bombed-out neighborhoods around the Galleria Umberto Primo in the heart of Naples. It is August, 1944, and "we were on the crest of the wave. We? We were Americans, from the best little old country on God's green earth. And if you don't believe me, mister, I'll knock your teeth in..." Can these be our heroes? Burns's voice breaks through at one point: "To this day I'm convinced of Italy's greatness in the world of the spirit. In war she's a tragic farce. In love and sunlight and music and humanity she has something that humanity sorely needs." Burns proves his point in page after page of eloquent recollection.