Gam

( 3 )

Overview

A flawed planet, claim-jumped by a single human, erupts in a frantic flow of non-stop action.

Gam is a flawed planet, teeming with life, bypassed for colonization by Earth, claim-jumped by a solitary man who is abruptly confronted by crystalline aliens pursuing a monstrous destroyer. Kaska joins their frantic mission, becoming more than himself, beyond human.

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More About This Book

Overview

A flawed planet, claim-jumped by a single human, erupts in a frantic flow of non-stop action.

Gam is a flawed planet, teeming with life, bypassed for colonization by Earth, claim-jumped by a solitary man who is abruptly confronted by crystalline aliens pursuing a monstrous destroyer. Kaska joins their frantic mission, becoming more than himself, beyond human.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780595121779
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/1/2000
  • Pages: 252
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2003

    Creative!

    'Gam,' the first novel of the Kaska trilogy by William Alan Rieser, introduces us to the hero who gives the series its title. Ian McCaskill, ¿Kaska,¿ is a member of an exploration team investigating Gamma Hydra VIII as a possible planet for human colonization. Kaska finds Gam, as he calls it, to be a world infinitely superior to the Earth that mankind has despoiled. Brilliantly versed in computer and biological science, the star-farer fakes his own death and is left behind when the team determines that Gam is uninhabitable. Kaska¿s opinion is that Gam¿s ¿flaw at the molecular level¿ is not insurmountable. A cave that he has fashioned into a self-sustaining environment becomes Kaska¿s new home, a place where he can enjoy the untouched beauty of Gam and study the alien flora and fauna of a world with both similarities to and dramatic differences from the Earth of mankind¿s birth. His sole companion and aid is a computer, an artificial intelligence that he helped to design and to which he assigned feminine characteristics and a sense of humor. KATE, whose name is acronym-derived, is at once Kaska¿s creation, protector and untouchable lover. At peace in his idyllic world, consumed with studying and categorizing the diverse life surrounding him, Kaska is at first unaware that Gam is already inhabited. The Tunkati, an ancient and peaceful race, have established a colony upon the world, a colony whose purpose is to watch over a vicious criminal. Psychologically damaged, essentially no longer recognizable as the same race, this evil being who is so tenuously imprisoned is a threat to the Tunkati, Kaska and the entire universe. With the help of KATE, Kaska is able to establish contact with the Tunkati. Beings of heat and light, their wisdom and experience written upon their fragile, crystalline forms, the Tunkati are unlike anything humans have ever before encountered. Beyond the incredible, wondrous experience of meeting and learning from such alien creatures, Kaska also finds that he may offer the only chance the Tunkati have for survival. His ingenuity is called upon when a natural phenomenon on Gam, seemingly innocuous, threatens the Tunkati through an unexpected physiological weakness. The boons he receives in turn dramatically transform his existence, as well as KATE¿s, and become integral to the increasingly complex relationships developing between man, machine, and Tunkati. With 'Gam,' William Alan Rieser draws his reader into an engaging journey. Kaska, while disillusioned with humanity, remains an admirable human being with whom one can easily identify. His empathy for the Tunkati, his genuine interest and appreciation for all of the wonder in nature, no matter how alien, are coupled with intelligence and common sense. The Tunkati race, though perhaps implausible in a scientific sense, represents a delightfully optimistic vision of what is possible within the universe. This might be summed up by their benevolent law cum religion: ¿Life is knowledge. Experience is wisdom. Preserve them.¿ They are a people we would be lucky to discover should we advance in space exploration. We find in Kaska a worthy spokesman for mankind, an ¿everyman¿ who is at once wise and practical, spiritual and earthy. Mr. Rieser¿s economical writing provides fast-paced action coupled with rich detail. The tale is further enlivened by the author¿s adroit sense of humor and perceptive grasp of human nature, as seen, for example, during one conversation between Kaska and KATE. Kaska explains to KATE, ¿`I cannot be surrounded by naked women on a planet where I am the only human male. Surely you can understand my problem.¿ `Oh yes, dear,¿ replied KATE. `In fact, I can see it.¿¿ Somewhat reminiscent of a blending of the writing styles of Robert L. Forward and the Robert A. Heinlein, 'Gam' is an intelligent, imaginative and exciting novel; though self-contained, it is a tantalizing beginning to what promises to be a rema

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2001

    Gam

    The best science fiction traditionally deals with universal ideas. This story adds to the tradition a new species of highly evolved life with its own social perspective, inevitably shaped by its unique form of existence. I especially liked the way the plot hinged on the fact that characters of different species each had the wisdom to allow for the possibility of benevolence in the other. The story is thus a potent reminder of the need for life-affirming values, and it speaks of the great attraction and joy to be found in communicating with beings who are radically different.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2001

    Gam

    I got hooked early when Kaska feared an image on his computer screen. The characters and creatures in this book are quite vividly portrayed and made real for me. The story is filled with twists and turns and is completely unpredictable. I pride myself on figuring things out ahead of time, but I couldn't do it this time. A highly enjoyable book.

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