The Gambler [Illustrated]

The Gambler [Illustrated]

3.9 16
by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Amanda Lee
     
 

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This short novel is about a young gambler who works as a tutor for the wealthy former Russian General. The novel emphasizes Dostoevsky’s own addiction to gambling. This is an illustrated version of the original novel.

Overview

This short novel is about a young gambler who works as a tutor for the wealthy former Russian General. The novel emphasizes Dostoevsky’s own addiction to gambling. This is an illustrated version of the original novel.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012969965
Publisher:
Five Star Publishing, LLC
Publication date:
06/09/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
882 KB

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Meet the Author

Few authors have been as personally familiar with desperation as Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881), and none have been so adept at describing it. His harrowing experiences in Russian prisons, combined with a profound religious philosophy, formed the basis for his greatest books: Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, The Possessed, and The Brothers Karamazov. When Dostoevsky died in 1881, he left a legacy of masterful novels that immortalized him as a giant of Russian literature.

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The Gambler 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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cmabaird More than 1 year ago
Altogether really pretty solid and great. Some truly ponderable and thought provoking narration, characters, and dialogue. Beware of this edition though; errand stray typos mar the experience. Hence the four out of five. Would very much recommend The Visit, by Friedrich Durrenmatt. The play's main character bears a resemblance to one of Dostoyevsky's.
IvanCastillion More than 1 year ago
One of Doestoyksys mostinteresting works. Short but supplee, filled to the brim with pathos and ethos. Story will make you laugh, very realistic as well. Riveting acount of a gamblers deadly addiction, and addictionthat leaves him destitute
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are far too many books in the world to stray down an alley and find The Gambler. Read Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, or The Brothers Karamazov instead. The Gambler, I don't think, will supplement your appreciation or understanding of Dostoevsky in general. In fact, I don't think he would have thought highly of it himself. It was a rush-job to make a little money for the author. It is about a man who becomes recklessy addicted to gambling (kind of too Vegas for great literature). (I'm from Las Vegas, so I can say that.) Just don't waste your time. You will never refer to it in a coffee table conversation or cite it in a research paper. If you need some source for gambling literature, okay, then go ahead a waste your time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fyodor Dostoyevsky¿s The Gambler was about a man, Alexey, who tells the story of a family betraying each other for money through his dairy. He is the main character who is looked down upon his family but as the story progresses, they look to him for help. This novel is full of conspiracy, greed, love, and weakness that lead to the destruction of a once happy group of people. First, there are five main characters. Alexey is the protagonist who is the narrator of the story. He struggles with the General for power in the family. The General is a pig-headed man who desires love and money. These two aspects are taken away from him in the beginning and then returned at the end of the story. Blanche is a gold digging woman who focuses her life on appearances. Granny is an old woman who controls the entire family and does not let anyone push her around. Polina, a simple girl, is very innocent in her actions but too naïve to make her own decisions. Next, the word ¿family¿ does not mean an actual group of people that are related. It actually is a group of people who are part of a rich club. Ironically, the ¿family¿ does not act as a family at all. They back stab and compete with each other for social standings. For instance, the General sends telegrams to the Granny¿s servant to see if she is dead in order for him to inherent her fortune. Also, there are many literary techniques. Gambling, distrust, hatred, greed, insanity, and conspiracy are motifs that recycle through the novel. Obviously, gambling occurs many times, hence the title of the story. Distrust, conspiracy, hatred, and greed all intertwine together. The General and Granny create these motifs because they never get along. Alexey foreshadows catastrophes through his diary when talking to the reader. He tells of problems that will occur the next day, but will not tell the reader of the incident until the next chapter. The main theme is that the human mind is weak. Gambling takes over everyone¿s mind and they are not able to turn away from the dice. The whole family borrows from each other so they can try and win more money. In conclusion, The Gambler was full of the aspects of evil. It contained the reality of the world and its darkness. I would recommend this book to someone who needs to open his or her eyes to what society has to offer.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The gambler is not a bad book, still, after reading the brothers karamazov and crime and punishment, it is a disappointment. you can really tell Dostoevsky was paying off some debt with the book-it doesn't have his very descriptive style, it is rather a simplistic view at the high society of XIX cent. europe, and some of his psychoanalysis is present, but compared to his other books it is disappointing, or, rather, he set his standards too high with the others. still, worht the while, its not even long.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is about a man named Alexei who is swayed by his passion for roulette. As Dostoyevsky once wrote about the character, 'The main point is that all his vital sap, all his energies, his impetuosity and boldness will be absorbed by roulette. He is a gambler, but not just an ordinary gambler...My hero is, in his way, a poet, but he feels ashamed...and he feels its ugliness deeply.' The translation turned out better than I expected though I suspect that it would be even better if I had known Russian and read it in its original format.