Games of No Chance

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$55.10
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $12.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 79%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $12.00   
  • New (3) from $50.18   
  • Used (7) from $12.00   

Overview

Is Nine-Men's Morris, in the hands of perfect players, a win for white or for black—or a draw? Can king, rook, and knight always defeat king and two knights in chess? What can Go players learn from economists? What are nimbers, tinies, switches, minies? This book deals with combinatorial games, that is, games not involving chance or hidden information. Their study is at once old and young: though some games, such as chess, have been analyzed for centuries, the first full analysis of a nontrivial combinatorial game (Nim) only appeared in 1902. This book deals with combinatorial games, that is, games not involving chance or hidden information. Their study is at once old and young: though some games, such as chess, have been analyzed for centuries, the first full anlaysis of a nontrivial combinatorial game (Nim) only appeared in 1902. The first part of this book will be accessible to anyone, regardless of background: it contains introductory expositions, reports of unusual contest between an angel and a devil. For those who want to delve more deeply, the book also contains combinatorial studies of chess and Go; reports on computer advances such as the solution of Nine-Men's Morris and Pentominoes; and new theoretical approaches to such problems as games with many players. If you have read and enjoyed Martin Gardner, or if you like to learn and analyze new games, this book is for you.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This book must be read by every serious student of two-person full-information games, and it provides an excellent presentation for anyone seeking a proper introduction to the subject." Solomon W. Golomb, American Scientist

"Some books make mathematics look like so much fun! This collection of 35 articles and a comprehensive bibliography is a marvelous and alluring account of a 1994 MSRI two week workshop on combinatorial game theory. This could be a menace to the rest of mathematics; those folks seem to be having such a good time playing games that the rest of us might abandon 'serious' mathematics and join the party...Even the technical terms are laced with humor." Ed Sandifer, MAA Online

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521646529
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 10/28/2004
  • Series: Mathematical Sciences Research Institute Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 537
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Table of Contents

Part I. All Games Bright and Beautiful: 1. The angel problem John H. Conway; 2. Scenic trails ascending from sea-level Nim to Alpine chess Aviezri Fraenkel; 3. What is a game? Richard K. Guy; 4. Impartial games Richard K. Guy; 5. Championship-level play of dots-and-boxes Julian West; 6. Championship-level play of domineering Julian West; 7. The gamesman's toolkit David Wolfe; Part II. Strides on Classical Ground: 8. Solving Nine Men's Morris Ralph Gasser; 9. Marion Tinsley: human perfection at checkers? Jonathan Schaeffer; 10. Solving the game of checkers Jonathan Schaeffer and Robert Lake; 11. On numbers and endgames: combinatorial game theory in chess endgames Noam D. Elkies; 12. Multilinear algebra and chess endgames Lewis Stiller; 13. Using similar positions to search game trees Yasuhito Kawano; 14. Where is the 'Thousand-Dollar Ko'? Elwyn Berlekamp and Yonghoan Kim; 15. Eyespace values in Go Howard A. Landman; 16. Loopy games and Go David Moews; 17. Experiments in computer Go endgames Martin Müller and Ralph Gasser; Part III. Taming the Menagerie: 18. Sowing games Jeff Erickson; 19. New toads and frogs results Jeff Erickson; 20. X-dom: a graphical, x-based front-end for domineering Dan Garcia; 21. Infinitesimals and coin-sliding David Moews; 22. Geography played on products of directed cycles Richard J. Nowakowski and David G. Poole; 23. Pentominoes: a first player win Hilarie K. Orman; 24. New values for top entails Julian West; 25. Take-away games Michael Zieve; Part IV. New Theoretical Vistas: 26. The economist's view of combinatorial games Elwyn Berlekamp; 27. Games with infinitely many moves and slightly imperfect information (extended abstract) David Blackwell; 28. The reduced canonical form of a game Dan Calistrate; 29. Error-correcting codes derived from combinatorial games Aviezri Fraenkel; 30. Tutoring strategies in game-tree search (extended abstract) Hiroyuki Iida, Yoshiyuki Kotani and Jos W. H. M. Uiterwijk; 31. About David Richman James G. Propp; 32. Richman games Andrew J. Lazarus, Daniel E. Loeb, James G. Propp and Daniel Ullman; 33. Stable winning coalitions Daniel E. Loeb; Part V. Coda: 34. Unsolved problems in combinatorial games Richard K. Guy; 35. Combinatorial games: selected bibliography with a succinct gourmet introduction Aviezri Fraenkel.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)