Gangster

( 60 )

Overview

Love. Violence. Destiny. These powerful themes ricochet through Lorenzo Carcaterra's new novel like bullets from a machine gun. In gangster, he surpasses even his bestselling Sleepers to create a brutal and brilliant saga of American murder, forgiveness, and redemption.

Born in the midst of tragedy and violence and raised in the shadow of a shocking secret, Angelo Vestieri chooses to flee both his past and his father to seek a second family—the criminals who preside over early ...

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Overview

Love. Violence. Destiny. These powerful themes ricochet through Lorenzo Carcaterra's new novel like bullets from a machine gun. In gangster, he surpasses even his bestselling Sleepers to create a brutal and brilliant saga of American murder, forgiveness, and redemption.

Born in the midst of tragedy and violence and raised in the shadow of a shocking secret, Angelo Vestieri chooses to flee both his past and his father to seek a second family—the criminals who preside over early 20th-century New York. His bloody rise from soldier to boss will lead him into ever more barbaric betrayals...until he meets an abandoned boy who needs a parent as much as protection.

A sweeping panoramic with riveting characters, Gangster travels through the time of godfathers and goodfellas and to our own world of suburban Sopranos. But this is more than just an authentic chronicle of crime. Setting a new standard for this acclaimed author, Gangster is a compassionate portrait of one man's fight against his fate—and an unforgettable epic of a family, a city, a century.

About the Author:
Lorenzo Caracterra is the author of the memoir A Safe Place and the New York Times bestsellers Sleepers and Apaches. He has written scripts for movies and television and is currently at work on his next novel.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
In his succinctly titled second novel, Gangster, Lorenzo Carcaterra (Sleepers, A Safe Place) turns his hand to an archetypal story: the evolution of a powerful American crime lord. An episodic narrative that ranges from turn-of-the-century Salerno to contemporary New York, Gangster recounts the life and times of Angelo Vestieri, a poor Italian immigrant who achieves a distorted version of the American Dream.

The novel begins in 1996. Angelo, who is 90 years old and has outlived his enemies and friends alike, is dying by degrees in a Manhattan hospital. At his bedside are Gabe, an orphan and de facto member of the Vestieri family, and Mary, an enigmatic older woman who was once Angelo's lover. Their combined reminiscences form the substance of the narrative, which recapitulates, in fragmented fashion, the high points of Angelo's career.

A key element of the story takes place in 1906, when Angelo's father, an impoverished shepherd named Paolino Vestieri, murders Carlo, his eight-year-old son, rather than allow the boy to fall under the influence of a local Mafia chieftain. Paolino then flees to America with his pregnant wife, who dies giving birth to Angelo during a stormy Atlantic crossing. Father and son eventually settle in the slums of New York and begin to pursue their vastly different destinies.

The law-abiding Paolino takes on a series of menial jobs, while Angelo encounters the three individuals who will shape, and warp, his life: a streetwise Irish delinquent named Pudge Nichols; a hard-edged, maternal tavern owner known as Ida the Goose; and Angus McQueen, a leading figure in the Manhattan underworld. Angus gives Angelo his first real "job" and his first taste of the highflying gangster lifestyle. From that point forward, the novel takes us through Angelo's rise from small-time hoodlum to embattled ruler of a lucrative, illicit empire. His volatile career encompasses gang warfare, murder, and personal betrayal, and reflects several decades of radical social change. It also costs him almost everything he values and isolates him permanently from the "civilian" world of family, friendship, and everyday human concerns.

Gangster is not an especially literary book. The prose is serviceable but not eloquent, the dialogue often stilted, and the basic material a shade too familiar. It is, however, an intensely cinematic novel that moves swiftly and cleanly through an extended series of vivid set pieces, most of which should play very effectively in the four-hour miniseries currently in development. Gangster may lack the mythical resonance of The Godfather, but it's an energetic, headlong narrative that offers some violent, visceral pleasures of its own.

Bill Sheehan reviews horror, suspense, and science fiction for Cemetery Dance, The New York Review of Science Fiction, and other publications. His book-length critical study of the fiction of Peter Straub, At the Foot of the Story Tree, has been published by Subterranean Press (www.subterraneanpress.com).

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
"I was now well-prepared to be a career criminal... I just didn't have the stomach for any of it." Carcaterra's latest crime novel is the tantalizing coming-of-age story of orphan Gabe, groomed by longtime New York City mob boss Angelo Vestieri to be his successor. The novel opens in the 1990s as Gabe, now middle-aged, keeps watch over Vestieri on his hospital deathbed. Slipping back in time to the Depression, the narrative tracks the rise of the famed mob boss from Italian immigrant to lord of Manhattan's underworld, when Gabe, 10, walks into Vestieri's bar after running out on his latest foster parents in 1964. Vestieri takes the impressionable boy under his wing and ushers him into the world of organized crime. Gabe runs numbers, collects debts and learns loyalty and the price of betrayal. Yet when the time comes for Gabe to take over the operation, he refuses, choosing a normal life despite his deep love for Vestieri. As he did in Sleepers and Apaches, Carcaterra shows dexterity in humanizing the denizens of the urban underbelly. Through a fine characterization of the enigmatic Vestieri, he provides a stirring perspective on the ways of mobsters and their history. Yet the book's central theme, the complex choice facing Gabe, is poorly developed, rarely penetrating the surface of his rejection of gang life. Carcaterra's portrayal focuses primarily on violence as the source of Gabe's revulsion, only touching on Gabe's understanding of how mobsters--through fear and corruption--influence society in much deeper ways. (Feb. 1) Forecast: From its bold title and catchy cover to the publisher's plans for major ad/promo, including a six-city author tour, this novel promises to perform. Its major push, though, will come down the road, from a four-hour ABC miniseries already in the works. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Covering a span of 90 years, Carcaterra (Sleepers) spins a dry and somewhat predictable tale of two generations of a Mob "family." Boss Angelo Vestieri lies dying in a hospital bed with two visitors by his side. One is Gabe, a man who as a child had been befriended and ultimately raised by Angelo. The other is Mary, initially introduced as a mysterious woman from Angelo's past who has come to witness his death. Through their recollections, we learn first of Angelo's rise from street urchin to boss, then of the development of his relationship with Gabe. By the novel's end, the ties among all three have been neatly explained, providing excellent closure to the story. What prevents the book from becoming truly compelling is the triteness of its characters, who seem to lack complexity in their behavior and who evoke no sympathy from the reader. Despite its shortcomings, Carcaterra's latest should still move in public libraries, especially among readers who enjoy gangster novels and also because it is scheduled to be a four-hour ABC minseries. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 10/1/00.]--Craig L. Shufelt, Gladwin Cty. Lib., MI Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
From The Critics
Over the decades, powerful mob boss Angelo Vestieri has defeated many an enemy by insuring close ties with his allies. However, the ravages of time and illness have taken their toll and by 1996, Angelo lies dying in a hospital bed. His prot‚g‚, Gabe loves Angelo like a father. However, Gabe cannot stomach the "family" business that he does not want to lead.Gabe thinks back to 1964 when as a ten year old he ran away from his latest foster parents and meets Angelo. The mob kingpin immediately sees something in the lad that he fails to observe in his own children. He "adopts" Gabe, whose job description includes number running and debt collection. Angelo instills values such as loyalty and honesty with one's friends in Gabe who truly loves his mentor. Gabe also hears stories about Angelo's coming to America at the beginning of the century and his rise as a crime boss. However, that does not mean the life of a Gangster is the lifestyle chosen by Gabe who wants to go straight. Gangster is an excellent portrayal of the life of a mob kingpin. The story line is exciting and character driven as the audience sees deep inside Angelo and to a lesser degree, his family and Gabe. However, best-selling author Lorenzo Carcaterra could have provided a better character analysis of Gabe for genre fans. That way, they would have a better understanding of the schism that splits Gabe's soul between his loathing of the mob life and his intense love and loyalty for the man who embodies its value system.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780762876266
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/30/2001
  • Edition description: 1 ED
  • Pages: 384
  • Product dimensions: 6.55 (w) x 9.57 (h) x 1.19 (d)

Meet the Author

Lorenzo Carcaterra is the author of the memoir A Safe Place, Apaches, and the New York Times bestseller Sleepers. He has written scripts for movies and television and is currently at work on his next novel.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

Summer, 1996


I had come to watch him die.

His head sank into the center of the pillow, his face an ominous
yel-low, paper-thin eyelids closed. IV lines and a heart monitor were
wired to his frail body, the veins on each arm were a thick purple. A
thin blue sheet covered his chest; long hands, more bone than skin,
rested flat across its top. He took in slow breaths, gurgles working
their way from throat to nose, the rank odor of death floating through
the room like seaside fog.

I pushed an ugly metal chair against the side of a cold radiator and sat
down, my back to the dark city sky. It was late, well past visiting
hours, but the duty nurses let me stay, waving aside the rules for the
dying man in room 617B, adopting the indifferent manner he had used to
ignore society’s demands for the bulk of his life. They walked in at
regular intervals, easing their way past the two guards who sat erect
just outside the door, their starched whites stretched by slightly
expanding waistlines. They checked his blood pressure, monitored the
IV’s and pumped in extra doses of painkiller with thin needles hidden in
the front pockets of their uniforms.

He had been in the hospital for four weeks and a priest had twice been
called to administer last rites.

“If he pulls through and you need me again, just call the parish,” the
priest said in a raspy voice that sounded more than eager to do God’s
work. “It’s just down the street.”

“You’ve been here twice,” I said as gently as I could. “That’s morethan
enough.”

“He needs to die in a state of grace.” The priest looked across the bed,
his liver-patched fingers shaking as they folded a purple vestment. “He
would want that.”

“No,” I told him, my eyes fixed on the dying man. “I don’t think he
would.”




* * *


I went to the hospital every night, leaving work just after six,
drop-ping by my apartment to shower and change before walking the ten
blocks north, stopping only to pick up a large salad and two cups of
coffee at a Greek diner across from the emergency room. I sat by his
bed, the light from the soundless television above us flickering across
our faces, the city sounds from the streets below merging with the beeps
and buzzes of the monitors attached to his body. Some nights I would
feel tears streak down my cheeks, as I saw the life depart from his once
strong frame. Other nights would bring waves of anger, tense reminders
of the evils he had heaped on those who dared to defy him.

As far as I knew, I was the only one who cared whether he lived or died.
He lay in that bed suffering from one of fate’s cruelest blows: he had
outlived both his enemies and his friends. His children would visit on
occasion, concerned more about a future cash windfall than his fi-nal
days. Each eyed me with distrust, suspicious of my bond with their
father, envious of our time together, wondering why he had chosen me to
share his secrets. There were two daughters and a son, all grown and
with their own families. They had been raised without the burden of
financial worry, but their father’s steady hand and love had long ago
been supplanted by suburban comfort, private school educations, trips to
Europe and hefty allowances. There were few shared memories to unite
them now and there was little else for them to do during these last
moments than sit, stare and leave as quietly as they had entered.

We exchanged nods and glances, never words, our common ground asleep in
the bed that separated us. It was a space that seemed as wide and cold
as a river, for we had each been exposed to completely differ-ent
variations of the same man. I wondered what it would be like to be them,
to know what they knew and feel what they were feeling. They were afraid
to touch or hug him, incapable of shedding a tear at his impending
death. It seemed a harsh way to wade through life and the strain of it
showed on their faces as they sat still as stones around a fa-ther they
were never given the opportunity to love. For them, his death could not
come fast enough.




* * *



It was toward the end of the fourth week. I was walking down the
hospital corridor, a hot cup of coffee in my right hand, the
now-familiar sounds of the floor blending like white noise into the
night. Behind me, I heard the elevator bell ring. I turned and saw
David, the old man’s son, rush out, his neck and shoulders wet from a
heavy rain outside.

“I figured you’d still be here,” he said in a soft, pale voice, poles
apart from his father’s deep tones. He was forty-two and a junior
part-ner in a downtown accounting firm, having done all he could to
dis-tance his name from that of the man down the hall. He was several
inches shorter and twenty pounds heavier than his father had been at the
same age, and he always seemed to have a cold.

I sipped my coffee and nodded.

“My sisters and I were talking about it this afternoon,” he said,
standing close enough for me to smell the Geoffrey Beene cologne
lingering on his face.

“Talking about what?”

“About whether we should even bother coming.” He looked over his
shoulders, making sure none of the nurses overheard.

I shrugged. “Do what makes you comfortable.”

“I mean, look, who’s kidding who? It’s not like he’d even want us
around. If he could talk, he’d tell us to get the hell out of his sight.
With you it’s . . . well, it’s different. It’s always been different.
There’s no reason for it to change now.”

“You don’t need to clear anything with me,” I said. “The way he is now,
he won’t know who’s here or who’s not.”

“He knows you’re here,” David said, his voice taking a step toward hard.

“I’ll have somebody call you when he’s dead,” I told him and turned
away.

“You’re just like him,” David said, as I made my way back to his
fa-ther’s room. “Maybe that’s why he cared for you like he did. You’re
both heartless bastards.”




* * *


It was nearing eleven on a muggy New York night, the Yankees game from
Anaheim just beginning, when the door to room 617B eased open. I looked
away from the TV expecting a nurse. Instead, I watched a well-dressed
older woman walk quietly toward the bed. She looked to be in her late
sixties, with thick gray hair combed straight back in an old-fashioned
twist. There was a soft glow to her face, lines and wrinkles defiantly
held in check. She had sharp dark eyes, red pol-ish spread over
manicured nails and a two-piece navy pantsuit under a blue topcoat. She
removed the coat, gently folding it and resting it at the foot of the
bed.

“Is there a chair for me?” she asked, her eyes firmly on the man in the
bed.

I got up and slid mine toward her, watching her walk over to the old
man, lean down and kiss his forehead. Her hands stroked his fingers as
she lowered her head and whispered unheard words into his ear. I had
never seen her before and didn’t know her name. I did know, from the
ease of her movements, that she cared for him.

She turned from the old man and, for the first time since she en-tered
the room, looked up at me, her eyes clouded. “You must be Gabe,” she
said. “He always talked about you. From when you were a little boy.”

“I had the idea he didn’t like to talk at all,” I said, strangely
comfort-able in her company.

“That’s true.” A slight smile creased her face. “About most things and
with most people.” The smile on her face grew wider. “I’m Mary,” she
said now. “At least I’m Mary to everyone but him.”

“And what does he call you?” I returned the smile. It was impossible not
to return that smile.

A hint of a younger woman crept into her voice. “Skipper.”

“Why?”

“The first time I met him, my father took us out on his boat. Once we
were out of the harbor I took the wheel, so the two of them would be
free to talk. But he never heard a word my father said. All he did was
look over at this kid manning a forty-three-foot boat. He figured none
of us would make it back to land.”

“He was born on a boat,” I said, leaning forward against the bed
rail-ing. “He didn’t care much for that trip either.”

She nodded and went on. “I’d handled the boat many times for my father.
I was practically raised on the water. But when I saw him look at me and
could see how nervous he was, I decided to have a little fun. So, now
and then, I’d give him a frightened look or act as if I didn’t know what
to do, which made him even more nervous.”

“He ever catch on?”

“Twenty minutes into the trip he figured out I was very lucky or very
good, and that either way was enough for us to make it back. The next
time he caught my eye, he winked. That’s all it took. For Skipper to be
born and for me to fall in love.”

“You were in love with him?” I immediately regretted my sur-prised tone.

“From that day to this,” she said, turning once again to the man on the
bed. “Nothing’s changed but time.”

“I’m sorry. I didn’t mean for that to sound the way it did.”

“No need to be sorry,” she told me.

“It’s just that I thought I knew everything there is to know about him.
All the places and all the people.”

“You know the parts he told you,” Mary said, shoulders pulled back in
perfect posture. “The parts you heard and the parts you lived through.”

“What don’t I know?” I looked into Mary’s eyes, searching for the face
of the brash young girl to whom the man in the bed had handed his heart.
Despite her calm exterior, there was the scent of a woman at ease with
the rules of danger. She had appeared like mist, invisible and unknowing
to me until these past few moments, yet fully equipped with secrets I
had believed would soon be lost forever.

“There are a few missing parts,” Mary said. “They might help you
understand everything that happened. I suppose he would have told you,
eventually. Now, it’s left to me. That is, if you’re ready.”

“I can’t imagine it can be any worse than the parts he already put me
through,” I said.

Mary studied my face, her manner poised and peaceful. She then glanced
at the old man in the bed and folded her arms across her waist. “You may
want to get yourself some more coffee,” she said.

Behind us, up on the silent screen, the Yankees had taken a one-run lead
against the Angels on a Tino Martinez home run.

Next to me, an old man, once strong, fearless and feared, inched closer
to his destiny.

Across from me, a woman I had known for less than fifteen minutes was,
with the sheer power of her words, about to shift the course of my life.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 60 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(46)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 60 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2004

    ENCAPTURING READING

    THE BEST BOOK I HAVE EVER READ.....ONCE I STARTED I WAS HOOKED.......EASY READING AND WONDERFUL FLOW.....

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2004

    A Must Have!!!!!!!!!!!!

    This book was so moving that I wept when the characters wept and laughed when they laughed. I fell in love with the characters. The author did such a wonderful job of relating true history with a good plot. I loved it, loved it, loved it!!!!!!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 12, 2008

    great book

    If you love hte mafia era, then you will love tis book.<BR/><BR/>great!!<BR/><BR/>one of the best books ive ever read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2008

    A reviewer

    I recommend this book to anyone who like has lived through a life of crime. I absolutely love this book because i can relate to most of the things and situations that angelo and gabe go through.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2004

    should be a movie

    its an amazing book read the book in 2 days could not put it down must read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2004

    Speechless

    Honestly, I don't even know where to start. It was just that good.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2004

    UNBELIEVABLE!!! MORE THAN FIVE STARS!!!

    One of the best books I have ever read. The characters jump off the pages and you feel as if you are standing there watching it all unfold. Mr. Carcaterra has done it again. I highly recommend this book to anyone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2003

    Unbelievable story

    I am only 14 years old, but I fell in love with this book. I read it in two days. The start of organized crime and how a boy who was dirt poor can become the most powerful mafia leader. Then, how he can train up a boy and all of this. It is a must read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2013

    Not that good

    This book had a lot of flaws. In many instaces it lacked credability. In some places it was so boring I had to skip paragraphs. It lacked all the drama and intriege of the GODFATHER. Does not even come close. I don' t know lf Lorenzo knows how murder plots take place or just didn't think them through. Go read The Hoods by Harry Grey.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2012

    Do u know a good clan to be my enime?

    Emeraldstar

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2012

    This book is what got me back in to reading, its a fantastic nov

    This book is what got me back in to reading, its a fantastic novel that gives layers to your gangster archytypes. Beautifuly written and thought provoking Gangster is a book I would reccomend to anyone interested within the mafia ideals

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2012

    Dont u dare f*cking mess with my clan

    (:

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2012

    Weedclaw deputy to gunstar

    Yo came onto our clan i made up my mind

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2012

    Geckoleaf

    "Oh," l say.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2012

    Knifeclaw

    "All you cats whining about whatever, need to chill, and leave us alone. Quit stirrin' up trouble and sort out your problems like adults, not kits!"
    -|<|\|!¿€¿|@\/\/

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2012

    Invisiblestar

    Ok. Thouches her nose to Gunstars nose and he felt electricity run through his body. Invisible cats can see each other.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2012

    Gunstar to ALL

    We are moving camp to dancer all results! All the areas are at the same results here. Haave a good night.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 28, 2012

    A good read!

    Thought it was a good read that keep you interested and wondering what would happen on the next page.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2007

    Amazing

    This book is a definite page turner.The plot was amazing and left me hungry for more. I didn't want the thrill ride to end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2007

    Mindblowing

    An absolutely great novel. Exciting, a page turner. Read it twice.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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