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Garden of Rama (Rama Series #3)

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Overview

In the spellbinding Arthur C. Clarke tradition, here is an exhilarating adventure into the hearts of both the Universe and mankind...

By the twenty-third century Earth has already had two encounters with massive, mysterious robotic spacecraft from beyond our solar system—the incontestable proof of an alien technology that far exceeds our own. Now three human cosmonauts are trapped aboard a labyrinthine Raman vessel, where it will take all of their physical and mental resources ...

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Overview

In the spellbinding Arthur C. Clarke tradition, here is an exhilarating adventure into the hearts of both the Universe and mankind...

By the twenty-third century Earth has already had two encounters with massive, mysterious robotic spacecraft from beyond our solar system—the incontestable proof of an alien technology that far exceeds our own. Now three human cosmonauts are trapped aboard a labyrinthine Raman vessel, where it will take all of their physical and mental resources to surviv. Only twelve years into their journey do these intrepid travelers learn their destination and face their ultimate challenge: a rendevous with a Raman base—and the unseen architects of their galactic home. The cosmonauts have given up family, friends, and possessions to live a new kind of life. But the answers that await them at the Raman Node will require an even greater sacrifice—if humanity is indeed ready to learn the awe-inspiring truth.

The Ramans return in the third saga of extraterrestrial contact--a riveting odyssey of a future Eden. The phenomenon begun in Rendezvous with Rama and carried on in Rama II continues in a masterpiece of technological extrapolation--an exhilarating adventure into the heart of both the universe and humankind. A New York Times Notable Book for 1990.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Introduced in Clarke's 1973 Hugo- and Nebula-winning Rendezvous with Rama and most recently seen in Clarke and Lee's Rama II , the massive spacecraft Rama is back, but the luster and sense of wonder generated by its first appearances have eroded. The once-exciting vessel, a ``cylindrical worldlet,'' has been turned into a cheaply painted backdrop for an equally garish exposition of vice-lord politics. When Rama returns to earth and demands a sample of humanity for observation, a lying, corrupt government hands over 2000 citizens. These individuals serve as a microcosm to reflect most of today's big sociological problems, thus implying that in 300 years no existing problems will have been solved nor will any others have been created. Clarke's unmistakable style is sadly lacking. Essentially, the book suffers from an imbalance between what occurs onstage and what offstage. Minor characters are built up with detailed introductions and then generally ignored. Major events, about which reader interest has been piqued, are skipped, then given a one-sentence review. Potentially captivating interactions with aliens and advanced technology are ignored. Readers are advised to give this voyage a miss and wait for Rama's next adventure. (Aug.)
Library Journal
Trapped aboard the massive Raman spacecraft as it leaves Earth's solar system, three cosmonauts begin a 13-year voyage toward an unkown destination. Combining the best of space adventure (as the spacefarers encounter other life forms within the multi-habitat vessel) with human drama (as children are born and raised in an unearthly environment), this third novel in the Rama cycle asks as many questions as it answers. Recommended, along with Clarke's classic Rendezvous with Rama ( LJ 8/73) and Rama II (Bantam, 1989, coauthored with Lee), for most libraries. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/91
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553298178
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/28/1992
  • Series: Rama Series , #3
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 528
  • Sales rank: 155,288
  • Product dimensions: 4.17 (w) x 6.87 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Arthur C. Clarke
Arthur C. Clarke has long been considered the greatest science fiction writer of all time. He was an international treasure in many other ways, including the fact that a 1945 article by him led to the invention of satellite technology. Books by Clarke -- both fiction and nonfiction -- have sold more than one hundred million copies worldwide. He died in 2008.

Biography

Widely considered the greatest science fiction writer of all time, Arthur C. Clarke turned his formidable technical knowledge and lively creative imagination into an amazing career that spanned the fields of literature, invention, futurology, and entertainment.

Born in 1917 in the seaside town of Minehad in Somerset, England, Clarke developed an early interest in both science and its literary sister, speculative science fiction. After secondary school he moved to London and joined the British Interplanetary Society, where he contributed articles to the Society's bulletin. During WWII, he joined the RAF, working in the experimental trials of Ground Controlled Approach Radar, the forerunner of today's air traffic control systems. (This experience inspired his only non-science fiction novel, 1963's Glide Path.) In a technical paper written in 1945 for the UK periodical Wireless World, he set out the principles of satellite communication that would lead to the global satellite systems in use today.

After WWII, he attended King's College, London, on scholarship and received first class honors in Physics and Mathematics. He sold his first sci-fi story to Astounding Science Fiction magazine in May of 1946. From that point on, he never stopped writing. Some of his more notable works include Childhood's End, Rendezvous with Rama, and The Fountains of Paradise.

In 1964, Clarke was approached by film auteur Stanley Kubrick to collaborate on a science fiction movie script. The material chosen for adaptation was Clarke's 1948 short story "The Sentinel," an eerie tale about the discovery of an extraterrestrial artifact. Over the next four years, he expanded the story into a full-length novel, while simultaneously writing the screenplay with Kubrick. In 1968, both versions of 2001: A Space Odyssey debuted to great acclaim. Clarke also worked in television -- as a consultant during the CBS news coverage of the Apollo 12 and 15 space missions and as creator of two distinguished series, "Arthur C. Clarke's Mysterious World" and "Arthur C. Clarke's World of Strange Powers."

In 1954, Clarke visited Sri Lanka (then called Ceylon). He fell in love with the country and settled there in 1956, founding a guided diving service and continuing to produce his astonishing books and articles. On March 19, 2008, he died in Sri Lanka at the age of 90, leaving behind an impressive literary legacy and millions of bereft fans.

Good To Know

Clarke shared an Oscar nomination with Stanley Kubrick for the screenplay of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Clarke was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1998.

In 1986, the Science Fiction Writers of America bestowed on Clarke the title of Grand Master.

At home in Sri Lanka, Clarke survived the deadly Boxing Day Tsunami of 2004 that caused the deaths of more than a quarter million people.

Clarke was an expert scuba diver and in 1956 founded a guided diving service in Sri Lanka, then known as Ceylon.

In Profiles of the Future (1962), Clarke set forth his "Three Laws," provocative observations on science, science fiction, and society:

  • "When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong."
  • "The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible."
  • "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
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      1. Date of Birth:
        December 16, 1917
      2. Place of Birth:
        Minehead, Somerset, England
      1. Date of Death:
        March 19, 2008
      2. Place of Death:
        Sri Lanka
      1. Education:
        1948, King's College, London, first-class honors in Physics and Mathematics

    Table of Contents

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    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 3.5
    ( 12 )
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    Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
    • Anonymous

      Posted March 3, 2008

      What a Book! What a Story!

      I try to read all of Arthur C Clarke even when he co-authors something like this with Gentry Lee. This is about the best, most exciting, interesting, imaginative book I have ever read. I cannot exclaim its virtues enough. Just the concept of Rama with the resulting contact by Nicole des Jardin et al., should be mandatory reading for all upper grade school, 'high school', kids. Sooner or later we will be contacted - manybe not in my lifetime or my kids lifetime or their kids lifetimes, but we will be contacted or we will contact there is abolustely no doubt in my mind and we need to have some kind of feeling of what and how we should handle it. This book is a primer for that contact and connection. It pretty well outlines the do's and dont's not that we really have to be reminded about our nature and our destructive side. We can and must develope an approach that will set forth our best side. Once we understand that we have to save the planet from ourselves, we will begin to understand how we fit into the universe. Sounds preachy doesn't it but God love Arthur Clarke and Gentry Lee for leading the way in this affair as Arthur Clarke has done so many times before. My thanks and good wishes to both these gentlemen.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted November 14, 2004

      disappointing

      This book has some good science fiction ideas and a large scope, but is definately a disappointment. The humans aboard Rama are given good living conditions and everything they need to live, but they still have vices. This books gets sidetracked into portraying crime and sexual content on a spaceship, and is definately not up to Arthur C. Clarke standards. Rendezvous with Rama was very good, but the rest of the series loses the normal ACC touch. I would recommend reading the first one only, then moving on to some serious Clarke like Space Odyssey and The City and the Stars, as well as Isaac Asimov's Foundation and Robot series.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted May 20, 2004

      Stranded on Rama

      Clarke, Arthur C. The Garden Of Rama. New York: Bantam, 1992. ¿The Garden of Rama¿ is about three cosmonauts Nicole Des Jardens, Robert O¿Tool, and Richard Wakefield end up being stranded on the spaceship called Rama. Nichol and Richard get married and have the first human child in the spaceship. Throughout the book, they try to find out who or what made Rama and what they want with humans. They also find that they are not alone. Author C. Clarke did a really good job in writing this book. He took what would usually be boring (their life on Rama) and made it interesting. He used a lot of descriptive words that make the book better, because he doesn¿t have to explain everything. An example of this is he said the gigantic symmetrical spacecraft instead of saying the big ship. This book was a little more boring than the last one because of its lack of action, it was more about the life of the cosmonauts than Rama itself. Later in the book more people come on board the ship then it becomes more politics and mystery than science fiction.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted June 15, 2003

      Rama III

      Another very dissapointing chapter in the Rama saga. One again Gentry Lee takes Arthur C. Clarke's fantastic creation and turns it into just another dull commentary on the human condition. Arthur C. Clarke fans should read the original book, 'Rendezvous With Rama' and forget about the rest of the books.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted February 10, 2003

      Good Sci-fi

      Boring in some places, but a good book overall. Some interesting points are brought up about the nature of humans.

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