Gaston de Blondeville [NOOK Book]

Overview

King Henry III is holding court at Kenilworth. Festivities abound, wine flows copiously, and spirits are high as the King and his subjects prepare to celebrate the nuptials of Sir Gaston de Blondeville. But the joyous mood is interrupted when a merchant, Hugh Woodreeve, comes distraught before the King to demand justice. His kinsman, he claims, was murdered, by the very man the King has come to honour -- Gaston de Blondeville!

Suspecting a ...
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Gaston de Blondeville

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Overview

King Henry III is holding court at Kenilworth. Festivities abound, wine flows copiously, and spirits are high as the King and his subjects prepare to celebrate the nuptials of Sir Gaston de Blondeville. But the joyous mood is interrupted when a merchant, Hugh Woodreeve, comes distraught before the King to demand justice. His kinsman, he claims, was murdered, by the very man the King has come to honour -- Gaston de Blondeville!

Suspecting a conspiracy against Gaston, yet obliged to hold a trial to determine the truth of the allegations, Henry imprisons Woodreeve in a tower while awaiting a hearing. Meanwhile, sinister forces are at work, represented by an evil abbot, who will stop at nothing to ensure the truth behind Woodreeve's claims is never revealed.

As the trial unfolds and the danger mounts for both Woodreeve and Gaston, a mysterious figure will come from beyond the grave to elucidate the horrible mystery!

The only one of Radcliffe's novels to feature a real ghost, Gaston de Blondeville was published posthumously in 1826. This edition, the first-ever scholarly edition of the novel, features a new introduction by Frances Chiu, uncoding the novel's long-hidden political, historical, and religious contexts. A wealth of supplementary materials, including excerpts from other primary texts and the complete text of contemporary reviews, is also provided to enhance modern readers' understanding of the novel's themes.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442935259
  • Publisher: ReadHowYouWant
  • Publication date: 7/16/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 813 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2013

    Cass

    Walked in stool some ice and nonchalantly walked out..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2013

    Joe

    Orders a martini*

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2013

    Jace

    Walks in. "Hello."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2013

    Ashley

    Looks at the text from her girlfriend and laughs.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2013

    Colten

    Your bar tender is back

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2013

    Lexi

    No. Im good. Thank you though. *She leaves a $5 tip and leaves.*

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2013

    Arielle

    Nvm

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2013

    Rory

    *shrugs*so you like fishing

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  • Posted March 25, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Too Much Humdrum

    Ann Radcliffe was an author who inspired many a Gothic novelists. Of Ann's six novels, Gaston de Blondeville was her last. In my opinion she did not end her career on a high note. There was so much boring detail about the procession of the King and Queen and their numerous banquets and entertainment. Just when the story would start to get interesting with the mysterious appearance and disappearance of the knight, it would go back to more boring detail again. Gaston de Blondeville was just not my cup of tea. I DO, however, recommend you read her other five novels. They are great!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2007

    A reviewer

    Valancourt Books¿ recent publication of Mrs. Radcliffe¿s Gaston de Blondeville is a publication long overdue. The novel, originally published in 1826, three years after the mistress of the Gothic¿s death, was actually written by her in 1803, but then suppressed by her from publication. The general belief is that she disowned the novel, thinking it inferior to her other work literary historians have also claimed that readers agreed and greeted its publication with little enthusiasm. The primary reason usually given for why it is inferior is that it is the only one of Radcliffe¿s Gothic novels where she chose to use a real ghost rather than explain what appeared to be supernatural occurrences. The general reader, and especially the student of Gothic and historical fiction, should be allowed to judge the matter for himself and now that Valancourt Books has republished Gaston de Blondeville, that decision can be made. Gaston de Blondeville, while admittedly not as full of chills and suspense as The Mysteries of Udolpho or The Italian, is a remarkable novel in Radcliffe¿s canon. It marks a noted departure from her earlier novels, and in many ways, it displays her growth and restraint as an author. Considering all her previous novels were published between the time she was twenty-five and thirty-three, a remarkably young age for someone to write three of the greatest Gothic novels of all time, as well as a couple inferior ones, it is not surprising that Radcliffe sought to move in a new direction in her work. Gaston de Blondeville was the beginning of her growth in that new direction, and had she written another like it, readers may have had a real treat in an even greater Radcliffe. My only criticism of Valancourt Books¿ edition of Gaston de Blondeville--which is filled with a superb collection of secondary sources and an impressive scholarly introduction by Frances Chiu to reflect the historical and political influences of the French Revolution upon the novel--is that no attempt is made in these supplementary materials to explain why Radcliffe made this departure from her past use of rational explanations for supposed supernatural occurrences. I believe that departure is the big question that must be answered about this novel, especially since Radcliffe was otherwise striving to be more realistic from a historical standpoint. Despite what is typically said about Gaston de Blondeville by literary historians, the six contemporary reviews provided in this edition are largely favorable. In her introduction, Frances Chiu quotes these reviews to argue that literary critics condemned the novel, but in truth, only one review is solidly negative while the rest express great enthusiasm for a new work by Mrs. Radcliffe. Chiu quotes La Belle Assemblee as saying ¿it is without the lofty pretensions of some of Mrs. Radcliffe¿s earlier productions, and incapable of exciting an equal intenseness of interest¿ but Chiu fails to quote what comes directly after: ¿it will not in the slightest degree detract from the fame of her¿ and ¿it will be read with great satisfaction by every reader of taste.¿ Scots Magazine was pleased that the novel does not include so much of her poetry which is not remarkable at all, and overall feels the novel is an improvement on her earlier work because ¿She avoided long particulars of rural scenery, and tedious trackings of the agitated mind, from one terrible or sorrowful imagination to another.¿ In fact, the only review that is truly negative is the Monthly Review, which does find parts of the work to praise but chiefly objects to its use of the supernatural. Why Radcliffe decided to include supernatural events as a reality has not been given a good explanation. Perhaps she felt the supernatural was more acceptable to the reading public by the earlier nineteenth century, nearly fifteen years after she wrote her first Gothic novel. While she may have been in competition with other Gothic writers, her contem

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