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Gates of Eden: American Culture in the Sixties
     

Gates of Eden: American Culture in the Sixties

by Morris Dickstein
 

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Widely admired as the definitive cultural history of the 1960s, this groundbreaking workfinallyreappears in a new edition.The turbulent 1960s, almost from its outset, produced a dizzyingdisplay of cultural images and ideas that were as colorful as the psychedelic T-shirts that became part of its iconography. It was not, however, until Morris Dickstein's landmark

Overview

Widely admired as the definitive cultural history of the 1960s, this groundbreaking workfinallyreappears in a new edition.The turbulent 1960s, almost from its outset, produced a dizzyingdisplay of cultural images and ideas that were as colorful as the psychedelic T-shirts that became part of its iconography. It was not, however, until Morris Dickstein's landmark Gates of Eden, first published in 1977, that we could fullygrasp the impact of this raucous decade in American history as amomentous cultural epoch in its own right, asmuch as Jazz Age America or Weimar Germany. From Ginsberg and Dylan to Vonnegut and Heller, this lasting work brilliantly re-creates not only the intellectual and political ferment of the decade but also its disillusionment. What results is an inestimable contribution to our understanding of twentieth-century American culture.

Editorial Reviews

Boston Globe
“Dickstein's study effectively carries us back to those times when we really believed that protest might stop a horrific war…[T]he best book on that exhilarating, depressing decade.”
Christopher Lasch - New York Times Book Review
“The autobiographical narrative alone would commend Gates of Eden to anyone who wants to know what really happened in a period around which clouds of myth and obfuscation are already beginning to gather.”
Christopher Lasch
With excellent literary judgment and judicious sympathy [Dickstein] covers politics and culture…the 'new journalism,' fiction, rock music, black writing and black nationalism and concludes with an autobiographical sketch that nicely reveals the relationship of the observer to the things observed.
New York Times Book Review
Walter Clemons
A vivacious, highly original work, combining literary criticism, political commentary…and candid personal testimony.
Newsweek

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780871404329
Publisher:
Liveright Publishing Corporation
Publication date:
02/23/2015
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
1,402,489
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

What People are Saying About This

Richard Poirer
A vital and important book for anyone who wants to know the intricate and sometimes explosive connections between culture and politics in the sixties.

Meet the Author

Morris Dickstein is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English and Theatre at the CUNY Graduate Center and the author of Dancing in the Dark, an award-winning cultural history of the Great Depression, and Why Not Say What Happened, a memoir. He lives in New York City

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