Gay Macho: The Life and Death of the Homosexual Clone / Edition 1

Gay Macho: The Life and Death of the Homosexual Clone / Edition 1

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by Martin P. Levine, Michael Kimmel
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0814746950

ISBN-13: 9780814746950

Pub. Date: 01/01/1998

Publisher: New York University Press

Before gay liberation, gay men were usually perceived as failed men—"inverts," men trapped in women's bodies. The 1970s saw a radical shift in gay male culture, as a male homosexuality emerged that embraced a more traditional masculine ethos. The gay clone, a muscle-bound, sexually free, hard-living Marlboro man, appeared in the gay enclaves of major cities,

Overview

Before gay liberation, gay men were usually perceived as failed men—"inverts," men trapped in women's bodies. The 1970s saw a radical shift in gay male culture, as a male homosexuality emerged that embraced a more traditional masculine ethos. The gay clone, a muscle-bound, sexually free, hard-living Marlboro man, appeared in the gay enclaves of major cities, changing forever the face of gay male culture.

Gay Macho presents the ethnography of this homosexual clone. Martin P. Levine, a pioneer of the sociological study of homosexuality, was among the first social scientists to map the emergence of a gay community and this new style of gay masculinity. Levine was a participant in as well as an observer of gay culture in the 1970s, and this perspective allowed him to capture the true flavor of what it was like to be a gay man before AIDS. Levine's clone was a gender conformist, whose masculinity was demonstrated in patterns of social interaction and especially in his sexuality. According to Levine, his life centered around the "four D's: disco, drugs, dish, and dick."

Later chapters, based on Levine's pathbreaking empirical research, explore some of the epidemiological and social consequences of the AIDS epidemic on this particular substratum of the gay community. Although Levine explicitly refuses to pathologize gay men afflicted with HIV, his work develops a scathing, feminist-inspired critique of masculinity, whether practiced by gay or straight men.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780814746950
Publisher:
New York University Press
Publication date:
01/01/1998
Pages:
274
Sales rank:
671,910
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 9.00(d)

Table of Contents

Editor's Prefaceix
Acknowledgmentsxiii
Part IThe Birth of the Gay Clone1
Introduction: "So Many Men, So Little Time": Toward a Sociology of the Gay Male Clone3
1"It's Raining Men": The Sociology of Gay Masculinity10
2"Y.M.C.A.": The Social Organization of Gay Male Life30
3"(I Wanna Be a) Macho Man": The Masculinization of Clone Social Life55
4"(You Make Me Feel) Mighty Real": Hypermasculine Sexuality and Gender Confirmation77
5"Midnight Love Affair": Gay Masculinity and Emotional Intimacy100
References to Part One111
Part IIThe Death of the Gay Clone125
6Bad Blood: The Health Commissioner, the Tuskegee Experiment, and AIDS Policy [1983]127
7Fearing Fear Itself [1984]138
8Men and AIDS [1989]143
9The Myth of Sexual Compulsivity [1988]158
10The Motives of Gay Men for Taking or Not Taking the HIV Antibody Test [1989]178
11Unprotected Sex: Understanding Gay Men's Participation [1992]205
12The Implications of Constructionist Theory for Social Research on the AIDS Epidemic among Gay Men [1992]232
Epilogue: Martin P. Levine, 1950-1993247
Index251
About the Editor260

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Gay Macho : The Life and Death of the Homosexual Clone 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
VoraciousReaderFromAZ More than 1 year ago
Part One was an excellent overview of gay male life in the big cities, especially New York City, in the 1970s up to the advent of AIDS in the early 1980s. However, Part Two gets bogged down in all the surveys, questionnaires, statistics and numbers the author compiled for his research. In my opinion it was dry, boring, and didn't add much to the overall tone of the book. If the book just consisted of Part One, I would've rated it 5 stars. Part Two dragged it down to 3 stars.