×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Gay Men Choosing Parenthood
     

Gay Men Choosing Parenthood

by Gerald P. Mallon
 

See All Formats & Editions

Gay parenting is a topic on which almost everyone has an opinion but almost nobody has any facts. Here at last is a book based on a thorough review of the literature, as well as interviews with a pioneering group of men who in the 1980s chose to become fathers outside the boundaries of a heterosexual union—through foster care, adoption, and other kinship

Overview

Gay parenting is a topic on which almost everyone has an opinion but almost nobody has any facts. Here at last is a book based on a thorough review of the literature, as well as interviews with a pioneering group of men who in the 1980s chose to become fathers outside the boundaries of a heterosexual union—through foster care, adoption, and other kinship relationships.

This book reveals how very natural and possible gay parenthood can be. What factors influence this decision? How do the experiences of gay dads compare to those of heterosexual men? How effectively do professional services such as support groups serve gay fathers and prospective gay fathers? What elements of the social climate are helpful—and hurtful? Gay Men Choosing Parenthood challenges a great deal of misinformation, showing how gay fathers from different backgrounds adapted, perceived, and constructed their options and their families.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Marriage is a uniquely powerful institution that would bring stability to gays, and this stability would benefit all of society. This is the central point in Rauch's provocative book in favor of gay marriage. A writer for the Atlantic Monthly and National Journal, Rauch (Government's End: Why Washington Stopped Working) believes that civil unions are unacceptable because they do not bring the community support of marriage, and the possibility of civil unions would weaken marriage by making it just one option among several. Rauch addresses several of the opposition's arguments, e.g., that marriage is for procreation and that gay marriage will lead to polygamous marriage and beyond. Though he has a remarkably rosy view of marriage and lesbians are largely absent from the discussion, this is a timely and readable book that will provoke people on both sides of the argument. In a much more academic work, Mallon (social work, Hunter Coll.; Let's Get This Straight) examines the experiences of 20 gay men from New York and Los Angeles who became fathers without a female coparent in the 1980s. Mallon conducted extensive interviews with the men, discussing how they got their children, how they created a family, the responses of the community, and the implications of gay male parenthood for society. He illustrates his points with verbatim excerpts from the interviews. Interviewing men who became fathers so long ago allows Mallon to present the long view of raising children, but it leaves one wondering how things might be different for gay men becoming fathers today. The subject of gay fathers is rarely studied and has implications for child services. With the topic of gay marriage on so many minds lately, Rauch's book is recommended for all libraries. The interviews and extensive bibliography make Mallon's a good purchase for academic libraries.-Debra Moore, Cerritos Coll., Norwalk, CA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Adoption & Fostering
Gay Men Choosing Parenthood is well presented and easy to read... I found this book insightful and invaluable study into an area where there has been little research/

— Ian Harvey

Co-Editor of Lesbians and Gays in Couples and Families

This book is both an engrossing journey into the lives of gay male parents and a superb piece of scholarship on psychological resilience and self-determination. You will never view fatherhood and family life in the same way again!

— Robert-Jay Green, California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University, San Francisco

Co-Editor of Lesbians and Gays in Couples and Families - Robert-Jay Green
This book is both an engrossing journey into the lives of gay male parents and a superb piece of scholarship on psychological resilience and self-determination. You will never view fatherhood and family life in the same way again!

Update - Jim Nawrocki
Important and much-needed chronicles of an emerging and evolving portion of American society, the queer family.

child of a gay dad
I don't know why people make such a big deal about having a gay dad. To be honest I am kind of sick of talking about it. In my day to day life I don't think so much about having a gay dad. My dad is my dad—and he is a great dad—he just happens to be gay, that's all.

a gay dad
I wish that there had been a book like this when I adopted my child. It was not a difficult decision for me to become a dad, but it was very complicated negotiating the foster care and adoption systems. Gay Men Choosing Parenthood will help other gay men who are deciding about parenthood to navigate this journey.

Adoption & Fostering - Ian Harvey
Gay Men Choosing Parenthood is well presented and easy to read... I found this book insightful and invaluable study into an area where there has been little research/

Youth Today
An affirming book for gay fathers or fathers-to-be, written with an excellent balance between anecdote and clear, simplified research.

Advocate
Gay dads of any kind, or men hoping to become gay dads, will find inspiration among these stories of real parenting, gender politics, community responses, and the personal transformation that life with a child brings.

Update
Important and much-needed chronicles of an emerging and evolving portion of American society, the queer family.

— Jim Nawrocki

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231508377
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
07/24/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
153
File size:
1 MB

What People are Saying About This

James Herbert Williams
Gerald Mallon's new book is a timely and important look at a rarely researched issue in family development, namely those gay men who choose parenthood. This work is comprehensive in scope and should contribute to a greater understanding of some of the issues and challenges faced by this pioneering group of gay men. I applaud the author's sensitive analyses and insightful conclusions which will inform future research agendas and practice models.

Dr. Joyce Maguire Pavao
Gerald Mallon's book Gay Men Choosing Parenthood gives the reader an opportunity to explore the fact that no one has the right to be a parent, but anyone who has the desire and the ability to provide a safe and stable family for a child in need, should be able to provide that healing and that family. People may have problems with policy around gay parenthood, but once a family is formed, we must work to provide the holding environments to keep that family—and most especially those children—safe and sound. Fathers are often underrated and underserved in general, and the world at large and professionals whowork with families need to have an understanding of the challenges and how to provide support, especially for gay fathers.

Peg Hess
Mallon skillfully grounds the unique narratives of gay fathers in the complex contexts in which they parent. These include the culture of the gay community and the mothercentric cultures of the child welfare system, neighborhood, school, and pediatrician's office. Mallon's original and compelling work challenges our biases, informs our professional practice, and reminds us that our attachment to myths keeps children waiting.

James J. Kelly
At long last, author Gerald Mallon has given voice to that unacknowledged vanguard of gay men who have stepped forward to parent children in need—without asking for anything in return but the opportunity to be loved by a child. This sensitive and timely book is required reading for all child welfare professionals and for gay men who are, or will be, parents. Drawing on an exhaustive review of research literature and social and legal policies, and enlivened by quotes from personal interviews, Mallon gives us an "everything-you-need-to-know" primer on gay male parenting—from strategies to becoming a father, to the realities of child rearing demands, and interacting with family, friends, and community.

Doctor - Joyce Maguire Pavao
Gerald Mallon's book Gay Men Choosing Parenthood gives the reader an opportunity to explore the fact that no one has the right to be a parent, but anyone who has the desire and the ability to provide a safe and stable family for a child in need, should be able to provide that healing and that family. People may have problems with policy around gay parenthood, but once a family is formed, we must work to provide the holding environments to keep that family — and most especially those children — safe and sound. Fathers are often underrated and underserved in general, and the world at large and professionals whowork with families need to have an understanding of the challenges and how to provide support, especially for gay fathers.
Terry Boggis
Though gay men have been fathers forever, gay men consciously having children in the context ofpartnered same-sex relationships is a recent social phenomenon. As men pioneer this new form offamily, there has been precious little literature to light the way. Gerald Mallon's book is a beaconfor scholars and researchers in this new field of study, but most of all, for gay men setting forth onthe journey to dadhood.

Meet the Author

Gerald P. Mallon is associate professor of social work and executive director of the National Resource Center for Foster Care and Permanency Planning at Hunter College School of Social Work. He is the author of numerous books, including Let's Get This Straight: A Gay- and Lesbian-Affirming Approach to Child Welfare (Columbia). He lives in New York City.


Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews