Gender and Spanish Cinema

Overview

What does the portrayal of gender in film reveal about Spanish society? To what extent and in what ways does Spanish cinema contribute to constructions of national and regional identity? How does gender interact with ethnicity, class, politics and history? Gender and Spanish Cinema addresses these questions and more in its examination of twentieth-century Spanish film. Defining "gender" in its broadest sense, the authors discuss topics such as body, performance, desire and fantasy. Gender is not considered in ...

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Overview

What does the portrayal of gender in film reveal about Spanish society? To what extent and in what ways does Spanish cinema contribute to constructions of national and regional identity? How does gender interact with ethnicity, class, politics and history? Gender and Spanish Cinema addresses these questions and more in its examination of twentieth-century Spanish film. Defining "gender" in its broadest sense, the authors discuss topics such as body, performance, desire and fantasy. Gender is not considered in isolation, but is discussed in relation to nationalism, race, memory, psychoanalyisis, and historical context. The chapters are wide-ranging, dealing with subjects such as Buñuel, cinema under Franco, 1950s melodrama and Pedro Almodóvar. Bringing together leading academics from the US, UK, and Spain, this volume provides the first broad overview of the relationship between Spanish cinema and gender.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781859737910
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 11/28/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Steven Marsh is at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Parvati Nair is Lecturer in Hispanic Studies, Queen Mary, University of London.

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Table of Contents

Introduction—Steven Marsh and Parvati Nair
• Between the Phobic Object and the Dissident Subject—Julián Daniel Gutiérrez-Albilla
• Costume, Identity, and Spectator Pleasure in Historical Films of the Early Franco Period—Jo Labanyi
• Masculinity, Monuments and Movement—Steven Marsh
• Madness, Queenship and Womanhood in Orduña's Locura De Amor (1948) and Aranda's Juana la Loca (2001)—Celia Martín Pérez
• New Sexual Politics in the Cinema of the Transition to Democracy—Alejandro Melero
• Borderline Men—Parvati Nair
• A Psychoanalysis of La Mujer Mas Fea de Mundo (1999)—Eva Parrondo Coppel
• Gender and Spanish Horror Film—Tatjana Pavlovic
• Heterosociality in Segunda Piel (Gerardo Vera, 2000) and Sobreviviré (Alfonso Albacete and David Menkes, 1999)—Chris Perriam
• ¡Victoria?—Rob Stone
• Theatricality, Melodrama, and Stardom in El Último Cuplé—Kathleen M. Vernon
• Radio Free Folklóricas—Eva Woods

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