Gender and the American Presidency: Nine Presidential Women and the Barriers They Faced

Overview

In Gender and the American Presidency: Nine Presidential Women and the Barriers They Faced, Theodore F. Sheckels, Nichola D. Gutgold, and Diana Bartelli Carlin invite the audience to consider women qualified enough to be president and explores reasons why they have been dismissed as presidential contenders. This analysis profiles key presidential contenders including Barbara Mikulski, Nancy Pelosi, Nancy Kassebaum, Kathleen Sebelius, Christine Gregoire, Linda Lingle, Elizabeth Dole, Dianne Feinstein, and Olympia ...
See more details below
Paperback (New Edition)
$30.24
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$32.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $23.50   
  • New (5) from $28.12   
  • Used (2) from $23.50   
Gender and the American Presidency: Nine Presidential Women and the Barriers They Faced

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$21.49
BN.com price
(Save 34%)$32.99 List Price

Overview

In Gender and the American Presidency: Nine Presidential Women and the Barriers They Faced, Theodore F. Sheckels, Nichola D. Gutgold, and Diana Bartelli Carlin invite the audience to consider women qualified enough to be president and explores reasons why they have been dismissed as presidential contenders. This analysis profiles key presidential contenders including Barbara Mikulski, Nancy Pelosi, Nancy Kassebaum, Kathleen Sebelius, Christine Gregoire, Linda Lingle, Elizabeth Dole, Dianne Feinstein, and Olympia Snowe. Gender barriers, media coverage, communication style, geography, and other factors are examined to determine why these seemingly qualified, powerful politicos failed to win the White House.

Watch the authors discuss gender and American politics on CSPAN's BookTV.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice
This timely, interesting study examines the careers of nine American women politicians to hypothesize why they were not assessed as presidential material. The women studied occupy the governorship of their states or seats in the Senate, are clearly brilliant leaders, but could not transcend the restricting force of gender obstacles to presidential candidacy. Differences in age, party, region, and rhetorical style are represented, as are evaluations of media coverage of the physical traits the women allegedly possess. The book offers in its first chapter a surprising bibliographic study of the growing literature on women and the American presidency. Few of the politicians studied are likely to be nationally known by readers, and an overview of their careers contributes significantly to the field of gender studies in general. Communication scholars Sheckels (Randolph-Macon College), Gutgold (Penn State, Lehigh), and Carlin (Saint Louis Univ.) are modest about the hypotheses generated—11, listed in the last chapter—by their research. They point out that many of the barriers to candidacy would also apply to men, just, apparently, not nearly so much. This has already become a common notion, and having solid research to confirm it is sure to stimulate further investigation. Summing Up: Recommended.
Lisa M. Burns
Gender and the American Presidency is an interesting and unique approach to studying the role of gender in presidential politics. In looking at the reasons why these nine successful female politicians have been deemed "unpresidential," the authors highlight the many challenges still faced by women in politics, especially when it comes to campaigning on the national level.
Myra G. Gutin
Sheckels, Gutgold and Carlin have produced a volume that is a major contribution to the growing literature of women and the modern American presidency. This well-researched and interesting volume looks at nine women who had “the right stuff” to be seriously considered for the presidency, but encountered major obstacles in their journey. In addition to analytical portraits of potential candidates for chief executive, the authors offer solid suggestions for future female candidates and ways in which they might crack the glass ceiling.
Anne Mattina
A timely and important book, Gender and the American Presidency offers insightful analysis into the issues female politicians grapple with as they emerge onto the national stage and the role communication plays in the process.
CHOICE
This timely, interesting study examines the careers of nine American women politicians to hypothesize why they were not assessed as presidential material. The women studied occupy the governorship of their states or seats in the Senate, are clearly brilliant leaders, but could not transcend the restricting force of gender obstacles to presidential candidacy. Differences in age, party, region, and rhetorical style are represented, as are evaluations of media coverage of the physical traits the women allegedly possess. The book offers in its first chapter a surprising bibliographic study of the growing literature on women and the American presidency. Few of the politicians studied are likely to be nationally known by readers, and an overview of their careers contributes significantly to the field of gender studies in general. Communication scholars Sheckels (Randolph-Macon College), Gutgold (Penn State, Lehigh), and Carlin (Saint Louis Univ.) are modest about the hypotheses generated--11, listed in the last chapter--by their research. They point out that many of the barriers to candidacy would also apply to men, just, apparently, not nearly so much. This has already become a common notion, and having solid research to confirm it is sure to stimulate further investigation. Summing Up: Recommended.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Theodore F. Sheckels is professor of English and communication studies at Randolph-Macon College.

Nichola D. Gutgold is associate professor of communication arts and sciences at Penn State Lehigh Valley.

Diana B. Carlin is associate vice president for graduate education and professor of communication at Saint Louis University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Chapter 1. Gender and the American Presidency: Nine Presidential Women and the Barriers they Faced: An Introduction
Chapter 2. Nancy Landon Kassebaum: The Junior Senator from Kansas with a Mind of Her Own
Chapter 3. Dianne Feinstein: The Loneliness of a Moderate Voice
Chapter 4. Barbara Mikulski: Wrong Style, Wrong Appearance
Chapter 5. Elizabeth Hanford Dole: A Star Surrogate
Chapter 6. Nancy D'Alessandro Pelosi: Tangled-Up in Stereotypes
Chapter 7. Olympia Snowe: Seeking a Sensible Center
Chapter 8. Christine Gregoire: A Competent Communicator
Chapter 9. Kathleen Gilligan Sebelius: Realizing America's Promise
Chapter 10. Linda Lingle: Forgotten Politico in Paradise
Chapter 11. Conclusion: What Must a Presidential Woman Be
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)