Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity / Edition 1

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Overview

One of the most talked-about scholarly works of the past fifty years, Judith Butler’s Gender Trouble is as celebrated as it is controversial.

Arguing that traditional feminism is wrong to look to a natural, 'essential' notion of the female, or indeed of sex or gender, Butler starts by questioning the category 'woman' and continues in this vein with examinations of 'the masculine' and 'the feminine'. Best known however, but also most often misinterpreted, is Butler's concept of gender as a reiterated social performance rather than the expression of a prior reality.

Thrilling and provocative, few other academic works have roused passions to the same extent.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'Rereading this book, as well as reading it for the first time, reshapes the categories through which we experience and perform our lives and bodies. To be troubled in this way is an intellectual pleasure and a political necessity.' - Donna Haraway
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415389556
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 5/1/2006
  • Series: Routledge Classics Series
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 117,434
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface (1999) Preface (1990) 1. Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire I. 'Women' as the Subject of Feminism II. The Compulsory Order of Sex/Gender/Desire III. Gender: The Circular Ruins of Contemporary Debate IV. Theorizing the Binary, the Unitary and Beyond V. Identity, Sex and the Metaphysics of Substance VI. Language, Power and the Strategies of Displacement 2. Prohibition, Psychoanalysis, and the Production of the Heterosexual Matrix I. Structuralism's Critical Exchange II. Lacan, Riviere, and the Strategies of Masquerade III. Freud and the Melancholia of Gender IV. Gender Complexity and the Limits of Identification V. Reformulating Prohibition as Power 3. Subversive Bodily Acts I. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva II. Foucault, Herculine, and the Politics of Sexual Discontinuity III. Monique Wittig - Bodily Disintegration and Fictive Sex IV. Bodily Inscriptions, Performative Subversions Conclusion - From Parody to Politics

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2003

    Not completely practical, but nevertheless highly influential

    There are serious limits to Butler's philosophical framework here, most notably in the degree to which she seems to assume that we can deliberately produce gender trouble in order to subvert normative sociopolitical practices, and in her assumption that identity politics within feminist movement can serve no further political purpose. Nevertheless, the text remains highly influential within academia for its deconstruction of our notions of sex/gender/desire and for its singlehanded founding of what would become queer studies. However, one must keep in mind that there are critical corrections Butler herself makes in her later work to some of the rhetorcial strategies she employs here.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2000

    break the boundaries and read this!

    Everyone should read this book,because it helps break down the social roles we are all faced with into what they really MEAN in our lives and how they retrict us to one behavior or another according to gender.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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