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Gendered Spaces
     

Gendered Spaces

by Daphne Spain
 

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Gendered Spaces

Overview

Gendered Spaces

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Gendered Spaces is a work of vaulting ambition and synthesis.

Catharine R. Stimpson, Rutgers University

Truly interdisciplinary, this work will support studies in anthropology, sociology, architecture, design, and of course gender.

Choice

This fascinating, scholarly examination delves deeply.

Booklist

Fascinating.

Publishers Weekly

Daphne Spain has written an original, challenging and enlightening book.

Michael Kimmel, State University of New York at Stony Brook

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
How does the organization of spaces--exterior locales and interiors for living, work and worship--reflect and determine gender relations? Spain (coauthor of American Women in Transition ) takes a cross-cultural, historical approach in answering this question. Among New Guinea's Wogeo Indians ceremonial men's huts serve as storehouses for flutes associated with supernatural powers; their geographic inaccessibility to women ``facilitates preservation of musical knowledge for men,'' which they use as a form of control over women. In contemporary offices women tend to be set pk ``together in one place (the secretarial `pool') that removes them from . . . input into the decision-making processes of the organization.'' For Spain then, gender-segregated spaces reinforce ``status differences between women and men'' to women's disadvantage. Spain details this fascinating topic with an impressive variety of examples, tables and interpretations of popular documents such as back issues of House Beautiful . She neglects, however, the relation of aesthetics to gendered spaces and manages a merely functional, charmless prose style. (Mar.)
Library Journal
By using male measures of status--control of labor and property and participation in public life--Spain postulates that gender-based spatial segregation results in lower status and restricted access to knowledge for women. Studying nonindustrial societies and 19th- and 20th-century America, she examines the interior designs of space within the home, school, and workplace. In nonindustrial societies, Spain shows how the division of space within the home indicated a degree of political power. Physical access to schools created ``gendered spaces'' because of male-dominated educational systems. In the workplace, traditional women's jobs were physically segregated, impeding women's access to knowledge and status. Her synthesis and examination of current scholarship are truly unique. Because of the industrial/nonindustrial examination, the volume is a bit disconnected until the final chapter. Too often Spain strays from her concept of space into the concept of women's sphere. Recommended for all academic and large public libraries.-- Jenny Presnell, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, Ohio
Booknews
Studies the pervasiveness of spatial institutions and their association with gender stratification over time and across cultures. An example: clerical work done (usually by women) in settings while managers (usually men) make decisions behind closed doors. Paper edition (unseen), $14.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807843574
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
03/30/1992
Edition description:
1
Pages:
314
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.97(d)

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
This fascinating, scholarly examination delves deeply into the impact of spatial constraints upon women's access to a variety of resources, and ultimately, to gender equality.—Booklist

How does the organization of spaces—exterior locales and interiors for living, work and worship—reflect and determine gender relations? . . . Spain details this fascinating topic with an impressive variety of examples, tables and interpretations of popular documents such as back issues of House Beautiful.—Publishers Weekly

Gendered Spaces is a work of vaulting ambition and synthesis. Daphne Spain is asking about the relations among gender, power, and space, our dwellings and domains. In the future, students of each must confront her probing questions and her challenging answers.—Catharine R. Stimpson, Rutgers University

An original combination of sociology and architectural design provides a convincing lesson on the association between gender stratification and spatial segregation. . . . Truly interdisciplinary, this work will support studies in anthropology, sociology, architecture, design, and of course gender.—Choice

Daphne Spain has written an original, challenging and enlightening book. From ceremonial men's huts in non-industrial cultures to nineteenth-century American vernacular architecture, her broad yet careful comparisons provide a topography of gender inequality and a blueprint for change.—Michael Kimmel, State University of New York at Stony Brook

Meet the Author

Daphne Spain is James M. Page Professor and Chair, Department of Urban & Environmental Planning in the School of Architecture at the University of Virginia. She is author of How Women Saved the City.

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