Gene Therapy of Cancer: Translational Approaches from Preclinical Studies to Clinical Implementation [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Second Edition of Gene Therapy of Cancer provides crucial updates on the basic science and ongoing research in this field, examining the state of the art technology in gene therapy and its therapeutic applications to the treatment of cancer. The clinical chapters are improved to include new areas of research and more successful trials. Chapters emphasize the scientific basis of gene therapy using immune, oncogene, antisense, pro-drug activating, and drug resistance gene targets, while other chapters discuss ...
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Gene Therapy of Cancer: Translational Approaches from Preclinical Studies to Clinical Implementation

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Overview

The Second Edition of Gene Therapy of Cancer provides crucial updates on the basic science and ongoing research in this field, examining the state of the art technology in gene therapy and its therapeutic applications to the treatment of cancer. The clinical chapters are improved to include new areas of research and more successful trials. Chapters emphasize the scientific basis of gene therapy using immune, oncogene, antisense, pro-drug activating, and drug resistance gene targets, while other chapters discuss therapeutic approaches and clinical applications. This book is a valuable reference for anyone needing to stay abreast of the latest advances in gene therapy treatment for cancer.

Key Features
* Provides in-depth description of targeted systems and treatment strategies
* Explains the underlying cancer biology necessary for understanding a given therapeutic approach
* Extensively covers immune therapeutics of vaccines, cytokines, and peptide-induced responses
* Presents translational focus with emphasis on requirements for clinical implementation
* Incorporates detailed illustrations of vectors and therapeutic approaches ideal for classroom presentations and general reference

Audience: Oncologists, molecular geneticists, and hematologists.

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Editorial Reviews

Richard K. Burt
This is a textbook of the gene therapy of cancer. The purpose is to provide a comprehensive review of the basis and approaches involved in the gene therapy of cancer. The authors are successful in devising an easily read textbook for gene therapy that provides a basic understanding of retroviral vectors and their clinical application. It is relatively comprehensive in its appropriate initial orientation to gene therapy, without the in-depth biology found in some molecular biology textbooks. "The audience is physicians, students, nurses, and researchers interested in gene therapy and its clinical application in cancers. The book is written by credible investigators in the field and it fulfills its objectives. "This book has multiple black-and-white and color illustrations and figures to help clarify points within the text. The references to each chapter are generally extensive in providing further resource materials. Although the book lacks the in-depth character of a molecular biology textbook, it provides an excellent orientation and thought-provoking analysis of the field of gene therapy as it pertains to cancer. "This is a well-written book that is well worth the time of investigators interested in understanding the field of gene therapy in relation to medical oncology.
Robert E. Sobol
...represents the 'state-of-the-art', describing the progress made to date in its written chapters. ...this book is a worthy addition to the laboratories and libraries serving the students, fellows and experienced researchers devoted to translating cancer gene therapy applications from laboratory to the bedside.
Daniel A. Haber
The recently published book Gene Therapy of Cancer presents an excellent, detailed, and comprehensive review of the many therapeutic approaches currently under investigation, their underlying rationale, and areas for further development.
CELL
From The Critics
Reviewer: Richard K. Burt, MD (Northwestern University Medical School)
Description: This is a textbook of the gene therapy of cancer.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide a comprehensive review of the basis and approaches involved in the gene therapy of cancer. The authors are successful in devising an easily read textbook for gene therapy that provides a basic understanding of retroviral vectors and their clinical application. It is relatively comprehensive in its appropriate initial orientation to gene therapy, without the in-depth biology found in some molecular biology textbooks.
Audience: The audience is physicians, students, nurses, and researchers interested in gene therapy and its clinical application in cancers. The book is written by credible investigators in the field and it fulfills its objectives.
Features: This book has multiple black-and-white and color illustrations and figures to help clarify points within the text. The references to each chapter are generally extensive in providing further resource materials. Although the book lacks the in-depth character of a molecular biology textbook, it provides an excellent orientation and thought-provoking analysis of the field of gene therapy as it pertains to cancer.
Assessment: This is a well-written book that is well worth the time of investigators interested in understanding the field of gene therapy in relation to medical oncology.
From The Critics
This second edition of a reference for researchers and clinicians provides updated information on the basic and applied sciences of gene therapy, covering areas including suicide gene therapy, oncogene and suppressor gene targeting, and the genetic modification of stem cells. Detailed background is given to explain the underlying cancer biology necessary to understand therapeutic approaches, and targeting systems and treatment strategies are explained. Material is in sections on vectors for gene therapy of cancer, immune targeted gene therapy, oncogene targeted gene therapy, manipulation of drug resistance mechanisms by gene therapy, antiangiogenesis and pro-apoptotic gene therapy, and prodrug activation strategies for gene therapy of cancer. The book is useful for researchers at all levels. Lattime is affiliated with The Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Gerson is affiliated with the Comprehensive Cancer Center of University Hospitals of Cleveland. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Booknews
Covers all modalities currently being used by developmental theorists to design new targeted treatments for cancer. Includes the basic biology of cancer and cancer immunology, along with cancer targets, oncogenes, the cell cycle, induction of apoptosis, drug resistance pathways, and tumor specific antigens. Includes discussions of therapies including gene replacement, ribozyme and antisense ligonucleotide therapy, retrovirus-mediated gene transfer, adenovirus gene transfer, nonviral approaches, tumor vaccines, engineered immunocompetent cells, and cytokine gene therapy. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
From the Publisher
Review of First Edition:
"...offers a comprehensive review of the rapidly evolving field of cancer gene therapy for basic, translational, and clinical scientists. The editors have assembled a distinguished group of academic contributors... Their insights into the progress of cancer gene therapy and the challenges ahead are thoughtful and provocative." - GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780080491363
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 4/4/2002
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 534
  • File size: 12 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Stanton L Gerson is Director of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center & the National Center for Regenerative Medicine at Case Western Reserve University and Director of University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center in Cleveland. Dr. Gerson studies DNA repair, stem cells and cancer therapy. He showed that over-expression of the MGMT DNA repair gene could prevent cancer and that a mutant form of MGMT protects hematopoietic stem cells from chemotherapy using lentiviral gene therapy. He has interrogated MGMT, MMR and BER DNA repair pathways as targets for cancer therapy, and proposed that methoxyamine would block base excision repair used in combination with chemotherapy. Dr. Gerson also directed the initial use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in bone marrow transplantation & in gene therapy.

Edmund C. Lattime is Professor of Surgery at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Deputy Director, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Dr. Lattime studies tumor immunology and immunotherapy focusing on the tumor-host interaction and the tumor microenvironment. While faculty at Sloan Kettering and then Thomas Jefferson University, his translational studies led to the development and Phase I testing of a novel Vaccinia-GMCSF construct designed to enhance the development of antitumor immunity via infection/transfection of the tumor microenvironment. Based on his mechanistic studies of immune escape mechanisms, his group recently developed and is testing a poxvirus-based immunization strategy, which uses antigen encoding poxvirus delivered to the tumor microenvironment, in patients with locally-advanced pancreatic cancer.

Stanton L. Gerson received his M.D. at Harvard Medical School. He was a Resident in Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where he became a Fellow in Hematology-Oncology in 1980. He is an Edward Mallinckrodt Jr. Foundation Scholar, and is currently Chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology at Case Western Reserve Univeristy, where he has served since 1983. Dr. Gerson is a member of several major professional and scientific societies and is a principal investigator of funded grants for several philanthropic organizations. He is author or a contributor to over 200 research papers, abstracts, theses and book chapters. Since 1987, Dr. Gerson has been invited to be a guest lecturer at over 40 national and international conferences.

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Read an Excerpt

An invaluable reference to this rapidly expanding field
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Table of Contents

Contributors
Preface
Pt. I Vectors for Gene Therapy of Cancer
1 Retroviral Vector Design for Cancer Gene Therapy
2 Noninfectious Gene Transfer and Expression Systems for Cancer Gene Therapy
3 Parvovirus Vectors for the Gene Therapy of Cancer
4 Antibody-Targeted Gene Therapy
5 Ribozymes in Cancer Gene Therapy
6 The Advent of Lentiviral Vectors: Prospects for Cancer Therapy
Pt. II Immune Targeted Gene Therapy
7 Immunologic Targets for the Gene Therapy of Cancer
Pt. IIa Vaccine Strategies
8 Development of Epitope-Specific Immunotherapies for Human Malignancies and Premalignant Lesions Expressing Mutated ras Genes
Pt. IIb Dendritic Cell-Based Gene Therapy
9 Introduction to Dendritic Cells
10 DNA and Dendritic Cell-Based Genetic Immunization Against Cancer
11 RNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells as Immunogens
Pt. IIc Cytokines and Co-Factors
12 In Situ Immune Modulation Using Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Vectors: Preclinical Studies to Clinical Implementation
13 The Use of Particle-Mediated Gene Transfer for Immunotherapy of Cancer
Pt. IId Genetically Modified Effector Cells for Immune-Based Immunotherapy
14 Applications of Gene Transfer in the Adoptive Immunotherapy of Cancer
15 Update on the Use of Genetically Modified Hematopoietic Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy
Pt. III Oncogene-Targeted Gene Therapy
16 Clinical Applications of Tumor-Suppressor Gene Therapy
17 Cancer Gene Therapy with Tumor Suppressor Genes Involved in Cell-Cycle Control
18 Cancer Gene Therapy with the p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene
19 Antisense Downregulation of the Apoptosis-Related Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl Proteins: A New Approach to Cancer Therapy
20 Gene Therapy for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia
Pt. IV Manipulation of Drug Resistance Mechanisms by Gene Therapy
21 Transfer of Drug-Resistance Genes into Hematopoietic Progenitors
22 Multidrug-Resistance Gene Therapy in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation
23 Development and Application of an Engineered Dihydrofolate Reductase and Cytidine-Deaminase-Based Fusion Gene in Myeloprotection-Based Gene Therapy Strategies
24 Protection from Antifolate Toxicity by Expression of Drug-Resistant Dihydrofolate Reductase
25 A Genomic Approach to the Treatment of Breast Cancer
Pt. V Anti-Aniogenesis and Pro-Apoptotic Gene Therapy
26 Antiangiogenic Gene Therapy
27 VEGF-Targeted Antiangiogenic Gene Therapy
28 Strategies for Combining Gene Therapy with Ionizing Radiation to Improve Antitumor Efficacy
29 Virotherapy with Replication-Selective Oncolytic Adenoviruses: A Novel Therapeutic Platform for Cancer
30 E1A Cancer Gene Therapy
Pt. VI Prodrug Activation Strategies for Gene Therapy of Cancer
31 Preemptive and Therepeutic Uses of Suicide Genes for Cancer and Leukemia
32 Treatment of Mesothelioma Using Adenoviral-Mediated Delivery of Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase Gene in Combination with Ganciclovir
33 The Use of Suicide Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Malignancies of the Brain
34 Case Study of Combined Gene and Radiation Therapy as an Approach in the Treatment of Cancer
Index
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2007

    The vital facts about the dangers of gene therapy

    In Edmund C. Lattime's book: Understanding Gene Therapy, he poses a simple idea but one with enormous potential. If a gene is defective in the human body, just replace it with one that works properly. Gene therapy would mean that genetic disorders would become a thing of the past. Cancer would be cured, as would cystic fibrosis and hundreds of other genetic illnesses. Although the concept of gene therapy is simple, the practice of administering the treatment is much more difficult. In order to replace defective genes, doctors must get working ones into the body and to the place where they are needed. Scientists had an ingenious solution to the problem. Hijack one of our most deadly enemies--the virus. A virus infects a human by inserting its harmful genes directly inside our cells. Normally this causes damage to the cell making us sick, but scientists were convinced they could tame this natural ability. Replace the harmful genes with good ones, and the virus would be the perfect delivery vehicle. It was initially believed that a retrovirus would be the best way of getting modified genes into the body. Most viruses and cellular organisms store their genetic material as DNA. Retroviruses use RNA instead. Retroviruses combine their genetic material with that of the host permanently, hence they can offer a permanent cure. Unfortunately trials using retroviruses had very little success treating any illness other than one particular type of blood disorder, severe combined immunodeficiency. Scientists realized that if they wanted to treat organs in the body like the heart, liver or lungs, they would have to find an alternative way of delivering their treatment--retroviruses simply couldn't get in. The answer would come in 1992. Using the most common virus around: the adenovirus, cause of the common cold, seemed like a good choice because it is able to affect almost every cell in the human body. But Scientists needed a disease to try the adenovirus vector on, and set their sights on OTC deficiency. So in 1998 the 'subject' was approached to participate in a trial. He knew that taking part was not going to cure his OTC but he was keen to help because he knew that if successful he would have played a part in curing thousands of diseases. Later that year he arrived at the University of Pennsylvania to begin the trial. One day later a scientist injected him with the tame viral particles. He was given the biggest adenovirus dose of any of the trial participants. The doctors told him to expect a small reaction to the virus. Two days later, when a nurse checked on him, she found that he was slightly confused and jaundiced. Although they doubted this was serious, the team wanted to be sure. The adenovirus was supposed to be harmless but his body was behaving like it was under attack. By the next day he was in a coma. Over the next two days his condition deteriorated until on day five, the team of doctors delivered the devastating news to his parents. He had no brain activity, and his internal organs were shutting down. The doctors suggested that he be removed from life support. He died a day later. What chance of success is there now for gene therapy and at what risk? For many people the dream of gene therapy is dead. It is not the cure all that was dreamed of years ago, but instead it is a highly selective treatment for a very small number of diseases. Gene therapy may still become an effective treatment for thousands of people but this is no miracle cure.

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