Genealogical Notes on the Founding of New England

Genealogical Notes on the Founding of New England

4.5 2
by Ernest Flagg
     
 
Ernest Flagg was a descendant of no less than 172 different New Englanders, most of whom settled in this country between 1635 and 1640. All 172 lines, which were concentrated primarily in eastern Massachusetts, the Connecticut Valley, Rhode Island and South Carolina, are set forth in this meticulously researched work.

Overview

Ernest Flagg was a descendant of no less than 172 different New Englanders, most of whom settled in this country between 1635 and 1640. All 172 lines, which were concentrated primarily in eastern Massachusetts, the Connecticut Valley, Rhode Island and South Carolina, are set forth in this meticulously researched work.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780806305332
Publisher:
Genealogical Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/28/1926
Pages:
496
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.00(d)

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Genealogical Notes on the Founding of New England 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you have significant New England ancestry and are interested in your genealogy, you are bound to find this book, originally published in 1926, both useful and entertaining. Ernest Flagg focuses on four groups of his ancestors: one that settled in the Connecticut Valley and the New Haven Colony; one that stayed in Eastern Massachusetts; one that settled in Rhode Island; and one that settled in South Carolina. He begins his book with 10 narrative chapeters, most of which detail the founding of New England, particularly Connecticut, and early events, including King Philip's War of 1675. Flagg includes extensive quotations from original records, but does so in a quite-readable style. The second part of the book consists of genealogies of Ernest Flagg's ancestors. While the only illustrations (copies of photos or paintings) are of Flaggs or spouses of Flaggs (descendants of immigrant Thomas 'Flegg' who emigrated 1637), many other families are featured in detail, from Allyn to Hooker to Whiting and many more. While probably no work of this type is without honest errors, Ernest Flagg was clearly a very careful genealogist. Here, too, Ernest Flagg appears to rely throughout on original records. If you are looking for apparently reliable information, you will find this book a goldmine. If you are a Flagg descendant, the book is particularly valuable, tracing the ancestry of immigrant Thomas Flegg back to Algar De Fleg, born probably about 1115.