BN.com Gift Guide

Genes, Memes, Culture, and Mental Illness: Toward an Integrative Model / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $89.94
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 39%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $89.94   
  • New (3) from $110.24   
  • Used (2) from $89.94   

Overview

What produces mental illness: genes, environment, both,neither? The answer can be found in memes—replicable units of information linking genes and environment in the memory and in culture—whose effects on individual brain development can be benign or toxic. This book reconceptualizes mental disorders as products of stressful gene-meme interactions and introduces a biopsychosocial template for meme-based diagnosis and treatment. A range of therapeutic modalities, both broad-spectrum (meditation) and specific(cognitive-behavioral), for countering negative memes and their replication are considered, as are possibilities for memetic prevention strategies. In this book, the author outlines the roles of genes and memes in the evolution of the human brain; elucidates the creation, storage, and evolution of memes within individual brains; examines culture as a carrier and supplier of memes to the individual; provides examples of gene-meme interactions that can result in anxiety, depression, and other disorders; proposes a multiaxial gene-meme model for diagnosing mental illness; identifies areas of meme-based prevention for at-risk children; and defines specific syndromes in terms of memetic symptoms, genetic/ memetic development, and meme-based treatment.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody Reviews
Reviewer: Steve Paschos, MD (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This is an attempt to examine mental illness through a common pathway of brain dysfunction which can be evaluated through an integrative approach using genes, memes (memory with portability) , and culture.
Purpose: The author wishes to integrate biological and social sciences for the "indivisible organism, the patient.
Audience: He hopes to stimulate thinking and innovation among various professionals, including psychiatrists, physicians, healthcare professionals, psychologists, sociologists, and anthropologists, in short anyone interested in the intersection of humans, behavior, and mental illness in the setting of biology and emotions.
Features: Part I considers mental illness in the setting of an epigenetic model considering genes, memes, and culture. Part II examines evolution and learning which leads to the emergence of memes and how they function as pathogenic, symbiotic, and beneficial entities. Part III explores new principles of diagnosis and treatment based on gene and meme interactions and discusses an axis I and II system with I for phenomenological and neurophysiomemetic diagnosis and II for genetic and neuroscience diagnosis. It also discusses treatment in terms of memetic therapy in the setting of existing psychotherapies and virtual reality therapy with avatars. Prevention and education are discussed as crucial parts of early identification of vulnerable individuals. Part IV breaks down and discusses specific psychiatric syndromes with memetic diagnosis, gene-meme interaction in development, and genetic-memetic treatment for each category. The book uses multiple tables and pictures.
Assessment: This is a new take on mental illness, an attempt to integrate biology, i.e. genetics, and sociology in explaining, diagnosing, and treating it. The figures and pictures are helpful in attempting to explain this difficult material, as the principles can be a challenging read. This is an interesting, albeit complex, unique view of mental illness in a world dominated by the DSM and the biopsychosocial model which does not provide true concrete, in-depth biological reasons for mental illness. This is a good read for someone looking for more and varied theoretical explanatory models of mental illness, but it comes at a rather expensive price ($129 at the time of review).
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Steve Paschos, MD (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This is an attempt to examine mental illness through a common pathway of brain dysfunction which can be evaluated through an integrative approach using genes, memes (memory with portability), and culture.
Purpose: The author wishes to integrate biological and social sciences for the "indivisible organism, the patient."
Audience: He hopes to stimulate thinking and innovation among various professionals, including psychiatrists, physicians, healthcare professionals, psychologists, sociologists, and anthropologists, in short anyone interested in the intersection of humans, behavior, and mental illness in the setting of biology and emotions.
Features: Part I considers mental illness in the setting of an epigenetic model considering genes, memes, and culture. Part II examines evolution and learning which leads to the emergence of memes and how they function as pathogenic, symbiotic, and beneficial entities. Part III explores new principles of diagnosis and treatment based on gene and meme interactions and discusses an axis I and II system with I for phenomenological and neurophysiomemetic diagnosis and II for genetic and neuroscience diagnosis. It also discusses treatment in terms of memetic therapy in the setting of existing psychotherapies and virtual reality therapy with avatars. Prevention and education are discussed as crucial parts of early identification of vulnerable individuals. Part IV breaks down and discusses specific psychiatric syndromes with memetic diagnosis, gene-meme interaction in development, and genetic-memetic treatment for each category. The book uses multiple tables and pictures.
Assessment: This is a new take on mental illness, an attempt to integrate biology, i.e. genetics, and sociology in explaining, diagnosing, and treating it. The figures and pictures are helpful in attempting to explain this difficult material, as the principles can be a challenging read. This is an interesting, albeit complex, unique view of mental illness in a world dominated by the DSM and the biopsychosocial model which does not provide true concrete, in-depth biological reasons for mental illness. This is a good read for someone looking for more and varied theoretical explanatory models of mental illness, but it comes at a rather expensive price ($129 at the time of review).
From The Critics
Reviewer:This is a new take on mental illness, an attempt to integrate biology, i.e. genetics, and sociology in explaining, diagnosing, and treating it. The figures and pictures are helpful in attempting to explain this difficult material, as the principles can be a challenging read. This is an interesting, albeit complex, unique view of mental illness in a world dominated by the DSM and the biopsychosocial model which does not provide true concrete, in-depth biological reasons for mental illness. This is a good read for someone looking for more and varied theoretical explanatory models of mental illness, but it comes at a rather expensive price ($129 at the time of review).
Description:
Purpose:This is an attempt to examine mental illness through a common pathway of brain dysfunction which can be evaluated through an integrative approach using genes, memes (memory with portability), and culture.
Audience:The author wishes to integrate biological and social sciences for the "indivisible organism, the patient."
Features:He hopes to stimulate thinking and innovation among various professionals, including psychiatrists, physicians, healthcare professionals, psychologists, sociologists, and anthropologists, in short anyone interested in the intersection of humans, behavior, and mental illness in the setting of biology and emotions.
Assessment:Part I considers mental illness in the setting of an epigenetic model considering genes, memes, and culture. Part II examines evolution and learning which leads to the emergence of memes and how they function as pathogenic, symbiotic, and beneficial entities. Part III explores new principles of diagnosis and treatment based on gene and meme interactions and discusses an axis I and II system with I for phenomenological and neurophysiomemetic diagnosis and II for genetic and neuroscience diagnosis. It also discusses treatment in terms of memetic therapy in the setting of existing psychotherapies and virtual reality therapy with avatars. Prevention and education are discussed as crucial parts of early identification of vulnerable individuals. Part IV breaks down and discusses specific psychiatric syndromes with memetic diagnosis, gene-meme interaction in development, and genetic-memetic treatment for each category. The book uses multiple tables and pictures.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781441956705
  • Publisher: Springer New York
  • Publication date: 5/19/2010
  • Edition description: 2010
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 300
  • Product dimensions: 9.21 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Hoyle Leigh, M.D. is currently Professor of Psychiatry at University of California, San Francisco, and Director of the Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Program at Fresno Community Regional Medical Center in Fresno, California. He is the author of many professional books and journal articles, including the textbooks, Handbook of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry, with Jon Streltzer, M.D., and The Patient: Biological, Psychological, and Social Dimensions of Medical Practice, 3rd Edition, with Morton F. Reiser, M.D. and Biopsychosocial Approaches in Primary Care. Prior to joining the faculty at UCSF, Dr. Leigh was Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine, where he founded the pioneering Yale Behavioral Medicine Clinic with Gary Schwartz, Ph.D., as well as directing the basic behavioral science course and the Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison Service at Yale New Haven Hospital. Dr. Leigh received his M.D. degree summa cum laude from Yonsei University School of Medicine in Korea, and completed residency training in psychiatry at University of Kansas Medical Center and the Montefiore Medical Center in New York.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Part I. Genes, Memes, Culture, and the Individual 1. What do we inherit?.- 2. Genes .- 3. Evolution.- 4. Learning and Imitation.- 5. Storage of Learned Information.- 6. Culture as Meme Stores.- 7. Culture and the Individual.- 8. Memes, Endemic, Epidemic, Pandemic.- Part II. Mental Illness.- 9. What Is Mental Illness?.- 10. Genes and Mental Illness.- 11. Memes, Stress, and the Brain.- 12. Genetic Memetic Model of Mental Illness.- 14. Diagnostic Scheme for a Memetic Multiaxial Model of Mental Illness.- 15. Memetic Diagnosis.- 16. Memetic Therapies.- 17. Broad Spectrum Memetic Therapies.- 18. Specific Memetic Therapies.- 19. Memetic Prevention.- 20. Specific Syndromes, each subdivided into: 21. Future Challenges.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)