Genesis Revisited: Is Modern Science Catching up with Ancient Knowledge?

Genesis Revisited: Is Modern Science Catching up with Ancient Knowledge?

4.0 6
by Zecharia Sitchin
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Space travel...Genetic engineering...Computer science...Astounding achievements as new as tomorrow. But stunning recent evidence proves that these ultramodern advances were known to our forefathers millions of yesterdays ago...as early as 3,000 years before the birth of Christ!

In this remarkable companion volume to his landmark Earth Chronicles series,

Overview

Space travel...Genetic engineering...Computer science...Astounding achievements as new as tomorrow. But stunning recent evidence proves that these ultramodern advances were known to our forefathers millions of yesterdays ago...as early as 3,000 years before the birth of Christ!

In this remarkable companion volume to his landmark Earth Chronicles series, author Zecharia Sitchin reexamines the teachings of the ancients in the light of mankind's latest scientific discoveries--and uncovers breathtaking, never-before-revealed facts about our planet and our species.

Editorial Reviews

Rosemary Decker
"Sitchin's works are outstandingly different from all others that present this central theme. His linguistic skills in the languages of antiquity and his pursuit of the earliest available texts and artifacts make possible the wealth of photographs and line drawings appearing in his books from tablets, monuments, murals, pottery, and seals."
reviewer Suzette
" . . . a mind-boggling revelation sure to overturn current theories about the origins of humankind and the solar system."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780939680856
Publisher:
Inner Traditions Bear & Company
Publication date:
01/28/1991
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
6.32(w) x 9.34(h) x 0.87(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The Host of Heaven

In the beginning
God created the Heaven and the Earth.

The very concept of a beginning of all things is basic to modem astronomy and astrophysics. The statement that there was a void and chaos before there was order conforms to the very latest theories that chaos, not permanent stability, rules the universe. And then there is the statement about the bolt of light that began the process of creation.

Was this a reference to the Big Bang, the theory according to which the universe was created from a primordial explosion, a burst of energy in the form of light, that sent the matter from which stars and planets and rocks and human beings are formed flying in all directions and creating the wonders we see in the heavens and on Earth? Some scientists, inspired by the insights of our most inspiring source, have thought so. But then, how did ancient Man know the Big Bang theory so long ago? Or was this biblical tale the description of matters closer to home, of how our own little planet Earth and the heavenly zone called the Firmament, or "hammered-out bracelet," were formed?

Indeed, how did ancient Man come to have a cosmogony at all? How much did he really know, and how did he know it?

It is only appropriate that we begin the quest for answers where the events began to unfold -- in the heavens; where also, from time immemorial, Man has felt that his origins, higher values -- God, if you will -- are to be found. As thrilling as discoveries made by the use of microscopes are, it is what telescopes enable us to see that fills us with the realization of the grandeur of nature and the universe. Ofall recent advances, the most impressive have undoubtedly been the discoveries in the heavens surrounding our planet. And what staggering advances they have been! In a mere few decades we Earthlings have soared off the face of our planet; roamed Earth's skies hundreds of miles above its surface; landed on its solitary staellite, the Moon; and sent an array of unmanned spacecraft to probe our celestial neighbors, discovering vibrant and active worlds dazzling in their colors, features,, makeup, satellites, rings. For the first time, perhaps, we can grasp the meaning and feel the scope of the Psalmist's words:

The heavens bespeak the glory of the Lord
and the vault of heaven reveals His handiwork.

A fantastic era of planetary exploration came to a magnificent climax when, in August 1989, the unmanned spacecraft designated Voyager 2 flew by distant Neptune and sent back to Earth pictures and other data. Weighing just about a ton but ingeniously packed with television cameras, sensing and measuring equipment, a power source based on nuclear decay, transmitting antennas, and tiny computers (Fig. 1), it sent back whisperlike pulses that required more than four hours to reach Earth even at the speed of light. On Earth the pulses were captured by an array of radiotelescopes that form the Deep Space Network of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); then the faint signals were translated by electronic wizardry into photographs, charts, and other forms of data at the sophisticated facilities of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, which managed the project for NASA.

Launched in August 1977, twelve years before this final mission -- the visit to Neptune -- was accomplished, Voyager 2 and its companion, Voyager 1, were originally intended to reach and scan only Jupiter and Saturn and augment data obtained earlier about those two gaseous giants by the Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 unmanned spacecraft. But with remarkable ingenuity and skill, the JPL scientists and technicians took advantage of a rare alignment of the outer planets and, using the gravitational forces of these planets as "slingshots," managed to thrust Voyager 2 first from Saturn to Uranus and then from Uranus to Neptune.

Thus it was that for several days at the end of August 1989, headlines concerning another world pushed aside the usual news of armed conflicts, political upheavals, sports results, and market reports that make up Mankind's daily fare. For a few days the world we call Earth took time out to watch another world; we, Earthlings, were glued to our television sets, thrilled by closeup pictures of another planet, the one we call Neptune.

As the dazzling images of an aquamarine globe appeared on our television screens, the commentators stressed repeatedly that this was the first time that Man on Earth had ever really been able to see this planet, which even with the best Earthbased telescopes is visible only as a dimly lit spot in the darkness of space almost three billion miles from us. They reminded the viewers that Neptune was discovered only in 1846, after perturbations in the orbit of the somewhat nearer planet Uranus indicated the existence of another celestial body beyond it. They reminded us that no one before that -- neither Sir Isaac Newton nor Johannes Kepler, who between them discovered and laid down the laws of celestial motion in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; neither Copernicus, who in the sixteenth century determined that the Sun, not the Earth, was in the center of our planetary system, nor Galileo, who a century later used a telescope to announce that Jupiter had four moons -- no great astronomer until the mid-nineteenth century and certainly no one in earlier times knew of Neptune. And thus not only the average TV viewer but the astronomers themselves were about to see what had been unseen before -- it would be the first time we would learn the true hues and makeup of Neptune.

What People are saying about this

Rosemary Decker
"Sitchin's works are outstandingly different from all others that present this central theme. His linguistic skills in the languages of antiquity and his pursuit of the earliest available texts and artifacts make possible the wealth of photographs and line drawings appearing in his books from tablets, monuments, murals, pottery, and seals.
reviewer Suzette
" . . . a mind-boggling revelation sure to overturn current theories about the origins of humankind and the solar system.

Meet the Author

Zecharia Sitchin (1920-2010) was born in Russia and grew up in Palestine, where he acquired a profound knowledge of modern and ancient Hebrew, other Semitic and European languages, the Old Testament, and the history and archaeology of the Near East. He was distinguished by his ability to translate and interpret ancient Sumerian and other ancient texts. A graduate of the University of London with a degree in economic history, he worked as a journalist and editor for many years prior to undertaking his life’s work—The Earth Chronicles.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Genesis Revisited: Is Modern Science Catching up with Ancient Knowledge? 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Oneira More than 1 year ago
This book is probably the best introduction to Zecharia Sitchin's work. It's easy to read and focuses on modern examples of his theories rather than ancient mythologies. I read this for the second time this year and was disappointed. If you're very familiar with his work I wouldn't waste your time on it. This book amazed me the first time I read it but now it seems to lack the depth that his other books have. Oh well. I do plan on reading all of his books a second time, and I don't foresee the same problem as with this one, except perhaps for the first half of the Twelfth Planet. Anyway, he was the leading theorist, in many ways still today, of the Ancient Astronaut theories. You don't have to prescribe to his theories to get a lot out of his books. His vast knowledge of ancient civilizations is more than enough to keep any reader's mind occupied! For the casual reader I do suggest beginning with this work before diving into the more in-depth Twelfth Planet (Book One of the Earth Chronicles).
Guest More than 1 year ago
After reading Genesis, Revisited, it all comes together. I read it with a Bible next to me, lo and behold fact was based upon fact, and not just mear myths.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The author's essential premise is that a) civilization on earth was influenced by visitors from Niburu, an as yet undetected planet in our solar system and b) that they have an outpost on Mars which has been shooting down our space probes. The material is fascinating and the writing engaging as one might expect from a former journalist. Its major weakness is its failure to provide any references to source materials so the reader must either accept it as new gospel or not simply on its own terms.The tie in to The Book of Genesis is too sketchy to do justice to explain some of the admittedly strange material in the first book of the bible, material about the Nephilim, the sons of god, having sex with the daughters of men, and the story of the Tower of Babel which appears out of nowhere in scripture. Great fun but cosmology lite for those expecting more scientific rigor and fewer stories about aliens turning our ancestors into slaves to work in their gold mines 300,000 years ago.