Genetic and Cultural Evolution of Cooperation

Overview

Current thinking in evolutionary biology holds that competition among individuals is the key to understanding natural selection. When competition exists, it is obvious that conflict arises; the emergence of cooperation, however, is less straightforward and calls for in-depth analysis. Much research is now focused on defining and expanding the evolutionary models of cooperation. Understanding the mechanisms of cooperation has relevance for fields other than biology. Anthropology, economics, mathematics, political ...

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Overview

Current thinking in evolutionary biology holds that competition among individuals is the key to understanding natural selection. When competition exists, it is obvious that conflict arises; the emergence of cooperation, however, is less straightforward and calls for in-depth analysis. Much research is now focused on defining and expanding the evolutionary models of cooperation. Understanding the mechanisms of cooperation has relevance for fields other than biology. Anthropology, economics, mathematics, political science, primatology, and psychology are adopting the evolutionary approach and developing analogies based on it. Similarly, biologists use elements of economic game theory and analyze cooperation in "evolutionary games." Despite this,exchanges between researchers in these different disciplines have been limited. Seeking to fill this gap, the 90th Dahlem Workshop was convened. This book, which grew out of that meeting, addresses such topics as emotions in human cooperation, reciprocity, biological markets, cooperation and conflict in multicellularity, genomic and intercellular cooperation, the origins of human cooperation, and the cultural evolution of cooperation; the emphasis is on open questions and future research areas. The book makes a significant contribution to a growing process of interdisciplinary cross-fertilization on this issue.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This timely monograph will prove essential reading - not only as a state-of-the-art overview, but also as an informed agenda for future research." Mike Mesterton-Gibbons American
Journal of Human Biology

The MIT Press

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262083263
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 11/1/2003
  • Series: Dahlem Workshop Reports
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 499
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Hammerstein is Professor in Organismic Evolution at the Institute for TheoreticalBiology at Humboldt University, Berlin and an external member of the interdisciplinary Santa FeInstitute.

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Table of Contents

List of Participants
1 Understanding Cooperation: An Interdisciplinary Challenge 1
2 The Strategy of Affect: Emotions in Human Cooperation 7
3 Cooperation without Counting: The Puzzle of Friendship 37
4 Is Strong Reciprocity a Maladaptation? On the Evolutionary Foundations of Human Altruism 55
5 Why Is Reciprocity So Rare in Social Animals? A Protestant Appeal 83
6 The Bargaining Model of Depression 95
7 Group Report: The Role of Cognition and Emotion in Cooperation
8 Does Market Theory Apply to Biology? 153
9 Biological Markets: The Ubiquitous Influence of Partner Choice on the Dynamics of Cleaner Fish - Client Reef Fish Interactions 167
10 The Scope for Exploitation within Mutualistic Interactions 185
11 By-product Benefits, Reciprocity, and Pseudoreciprocity in Mutualism 203
12 The Red King Effect: Evolutionary Rates and the Division of Surpluses in Mutualisms 223
13 Group Report: Interspecific Mutualism - Puzzles and Predictions
14 Power in the Genome: Who Suppresses the Outlaw? 257
15 The Transition from Single Cells to Multicellularity 271
16 Cooperation and Conflict Mediation during the Origin of Multicellularity 291
17 Mitochondria and Programmed Cell Death: "Slave Revolt" or Community Homeostasis? 309
18 Group Report: Cooperation and Conflict in the Evolution of Genomes, Cells, and Multicellular Organisms 327
19 Cultural Evolution of Human Cooperation 357
20 The Power of Norms 389
21 Human Cooperation: Perspectives from Behavioral Ecology 401
22 Origins of Human Cooperation 429
23 Group Report: The Cultural and Genetic Evolution of Human Cooperation
Name Index 469
Subject Index 479
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