The Genetic Revolution and Human Rights: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1998 / Edition 1

The Genetic Revolution and Human Rights: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1998 / Edition 1

by Justine Burley, Burley
     
 

The world was stunned by the announcement that scientists had successfully cloned a sheep. Suddenly, questions that had seemed merely academic or better suited to science fiction became topics for public debate. Should we clone people? Is eugenics morally defensible? Should cloning be regulated, and if so, by whom? How should genetic information about particular

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Overview

The world was stunned by the announcement that scientists had successfully cloned a sheep. Suddenly, questions that had seemed merely academic or better suited to science fiction became topics for public debate. Should we clone people? Is eugenics morally defensible? Should cloning be regulated, and if so, by whom? How should genetic information about particular individuals be protected? What will be the long-term impact on cultural and racial diversity? Based on the popular Oxford Amnesty Lectures, this fascinating and thought-provoking book collects work from leaders in the field, including Hilary Putnam, Ian Wilmut (co-creator of Dolly the sheep), and Jonathan Glover. It provides an up-to-date and realistic look at many of these challenging and contentious issues. Each chapter includes an introduction to the issue by a prominent lawyer, scientist, or philosopher, and the volume features a foreword by Richard Dawkins. The Genetic Revolution and Human Rights is an invaluable guide to the potential impact of this revolutionary technology on our future.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780192862013
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
07/28/1999
Series:
Popular Science Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 5.00(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

Justine Burley is Simon Fellow in the Department of Government at the University of Manchester, and is a part-time lecturer in Politics at Exeter College, Oxford. She is the editor of Ronald Dworkin and His Critics (1999, Blackwell) and (with John Harris) of A Companion to Genetics (1999, Blackwell). She is currently working on a monograph entitled Genetic Justice, which will be part of the forthcoming OUP series, Issues in Biomedical Ethics.

Table of Contents

Contributors
Acknowledgements
1. Cloning People, Hilary Putnam
Why Human Cloning Should Not be Attempted, Alan Colman
2. Dolly: the Age of Biological Control, Ian Wilmut
Cloning and Individuality, R. L. Gardner
3. Who Should Have Access to Genetic Information?, Bartha Maria Knoppers
Bad Genetic Luck and Health Insurance, Justine Burley
4. Clones, Genes, and Human Rights, John Harris
Cloning and Public Policy, Ruth Deech
5. Eugenics and Human Rights, Jonathan Glover
Eugenics and Genetic Manipulation, Alan Ryan
6. Silver Spoons and Golden Genes, Hillel Steiner
Tin Genes and Compensation, Jonathan Wolff
7. A Perspective from Africa on Human Rights and Genetic Engineering, Solomon R. Benatar
Rights and Beyond, Roger Crisp
Endnotes
Index

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