Genius: A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds

Overview

What is genius? It is the trait, says Harold Bloom, of standing both of and above an age, the ancient principle that recognizes and hallows the God within us, and the gift of breathing life into what is best in every living person. Now, in a monumental achievement of scholarship, America's preeminent literary critic presents an unprecedented celebration of one hundred of the most creative literary minds in history. From the Bible to Socrates, through the transcendent masterpieces of Shakespeare and Dante, down ...

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Overview

What is genius? It is the trait, says Harold Bloom, of standing both of and above an age, the ancient principle that recognizes and hallows the God within us, and the gift of breathing life into what is best in every living person. Now, in a monumental achievement of scholarship, America's preeminent literary critic presents an unprecedented celebration of one hundred of the most creative literary minds in history. From the Bible to Socrates, through the transcendent masterpieces of Shakespeare and Dante, down through the ages to Hemingway, Faulkner, and Ralph Ellison, Harold Bloom explores the many parallels among his chosen geniuses and the surprising ways in which they have influenced one another over the centuries. Accompanied by revealing excerpts from their works that continue to astonish, enchant, and move readers, Bloom's insightful and spirited analyses illuminate and enlarge our common understanding of Western literary and spiritual culture...and offer us a grand yet intimate tour of it in one magnificent volume.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Harold Bloom, whose provocative The Western Canon changed the way we look at the classics, now seeks to define the particular genius of 100 great minds, ranging from Socrates and St. Paul to Hart Crane and Federico García Lorca. Clustering these literary thinkers in groups of five (e.g., Dickens, Dostoevsky, Babel, Celan, Ellison), Bloom illuminates his subjects without historicizing them. His insights into writers and individual works reveal Bloom's own critical genius at work. The essay on Franz Kafka, for example, evidences Bloom's half-century-long encounter with the Czech author's oeuvre. Bloom enthusiasts will be pleased, too, by his spirited digressions on the blight of academic Groupthink and the distortions of postmodern cultural studies.
Penelope Mesic
"All genius, in my judgment, is idiosyncratic and grandly arbitrary," Harold Bloom writes in this book, which offers critical vignettes of 100 literary figures. The trouble is, of course, that those qualities, which Bloom possesses in abundance, are mere side effects of genius. Genius, to borrow Delmore Schwartz's brilliant definition of poetry, is gay and exact—a matter of exuberant life force and exquisite technical control, and neither of those things is arbitrary.

Bloom devotes a few pages to each of the writers he selects, from William Shakespeare to Ralph Ellison, grouping them according to a structure of his own invention based on the mystical Jewish system of codes known as the Kabbalah. He sidesteps the labor of formulating criteria for inclusion by observing, "These are certainly not 'the top one hundred,' in anyone's judgment, my own included. I wanted to write about these." The lack of focus contributes to a more serious deficiency: the absence of a point to be made.

Consider, for example, the introductory chapter, subtitled "What Is Genius?" Bloom first declares that the Kabbalah provides "an anatomy of genius." Without explaining this notion, he observes that the Kabbalistic scholar Gershom Scholem found that Franz Kafka's writing possesses "something of the strong light of the canonical, of that perfection which destroys." This is not an idea easily apprehended, but Bloom does not explain this, either. Instead he adds that Scholem's successor, Moshe Idel, believed that the canonical is "the perfection which absorbs." If there is disagreement even among the Kabbalistic scholars Bloom cites, the reader can hardly be blamed for feeling at a lossafter only half a page.

Supposedly the Sefirot, or symbols of the Kabbalah, provide a structure for grouping authors together by fives, but these divisions are like the rules of a made-up game. They reflect not an underlying truth about these authors' works but rather Bloom's past scholarship and predilections. He confesses before he begins that any of the writers studied could almost as easily belong to any of the groupings he has constructed. Consequently, there is no deep and systematic exploration of the nature of genius, but rather a string of largely separate pronouncements on one author after the next. The ambitious and largely ineffective framework is almost entirely dispensable. The book has value only when Bloom engages directly with an author and allows us to participate in his elation. Endearingly, he compares reading to falling in love: It's better, he claims, because the emotional cost is so much less.

As a reader of a particular beloved text, Bloom can be invaluable, in part simply because he has read so much. He has a genius for quotation—both from secondary material, such as letters and conversations that reveal an author's nature, and from the literary passages that embody an author's merits. Bloom quotes a defining observation by English essayist Walter Pater: "For [Plato] all knowledge is like knowing a person." He then adds, with striking succinctness, "Walter Pater summed up Romantic tradition in what he knew had become Charles Darwin's world." This ability to place an author in context in a single sentence could well serve the common reader, if so much else were not pretentious or obscure.

Bloom also shares the remarkable gleanings of his biographical research. He gives us, for example, Leo Tolstoy's affectionate comment on Anton Chekhov: "Ah, what a beautiful, magnificent man; modest and quiet like a girl." He recalls Robert Louis Stevenson's remark that he was "not surprised that [Henry David] Thoreau got along best with fish." And he tells us that Walt Whitman referred to Alfred, Lord Tennyson as "the boss."

Although he does not rank his geniuses, there are a quintet of authors described by Bloom as those who "dominate their genre," consisting of Shakespeare, Miguel de Cervantes, Michel de Montaigne, John Milton and Tolstoy. Bloom hedges by referring to Milton as the master of "the secondary or postclassical epic," but this qualification amounts to an admission. Would not Homer, who crops up elsewhere, be a better choice? Perhaps the vagaries of Bloom's selections—he includes Hart Crane, Eugenio Montale and Iris Murdoch in the book, but not Petrarch, Nikolai Gogol or Vladimir Nabokov—are in a way inevitable.

The chief problem with these groupings is that authors are bound together like contestants in a three-legged race. What end, for example, is served by herding together Honoré de Balzac, Lewis Carroll, Henry James, Robert Browning and William Butler Yeats? The heading of the section is "Malkhut," which means "kingdom," but this seems to boil down to the pedestrian idea that each of these authors creates a world. What author of genius does not?

No list could please everyone. Indeed, a worse fate than exclusion befalls authors whom Bloom includes but dislikes, chief among them Edith Wharton and Charlotte Brontë. Recoiling from what he calls "the phallic cudgel" of Brontë's style, Bloom feels the author is "bashing me over the head," an observation he never makes when an author of genius, however domineering, is in actual possession of a phallus. Wharton, whose "unpleasant genius" penetrates "the war between men and women," in Bloom's skittish view, is ultimately dismissed: "Perhaps Wharton was only a near-genius.... If her literary achievement needs to be bolstered, in our current fashion, by gender concerns and sociological contexts, then it would fall short of the qualities of innovation and continual freshness that genius ought to encompass."

Arguably this debate should have preceded her selection, but it does hint at a possible, almost incredible, purpose of this book. Apparently Bloom, who concludes the volume by calling the present "a bad time that deprecates genius," is trying to defend the whole idea of genius from what he regards as the destructive incursions of political correctness and the inflated value of works by women and people of color. "Without genius, literary language stales quickly, and resists revival, even upon the sacred grounds of gender, ethnicity, skin pigmentation, sexual orientation, and all the other criteria that dominate our media, including their sub-branch, our campuses." This is Bloom's parting shot, but he needn't have bothered. Genius always manages to earn its keep. Readers don't hang on to Shakespeare and Charles Dickens because critics tell us those authors are geniuses, but because they meet a living need. Bloom's joy in what he reads reminds us of this. His fulminations and Kabbalistic systems only get in the way.
From The Critics
"All genius, in my judgment, is idiosyncratic and grandly arbitrary," Harold Bloom writes in this book, which offers critical vignettes of 100 literary figures. The trouble is, of course, that those qualities, which Bloom possesses in abundance, are mere side effects of genius. Genius, to borrow Delmore Schwartz's brilliant definition of poetry, is gay and exact—a matter of exuberant life force and exquisite technical control, and neither of those things is arbitrary.

Bloom devotes a few pages to each of the writers he selects, from William Shakespeare to Ralph Ellison, grouping them according to a structure of his own invention based on the mystical Jewish system of codes known as the Kabbalah. He sidesteps the labor of formulating criteria for inclusion by observing, "These are certainly not 'the top one hundred,' in anyone's judgment, my own included. I wanted to write about these." The lack of focus contributes to a more serious deficiency: the absence of a point to be made.

Consider, for example, the introductory chapter, subtitled "What Is Genius?" Bloom first declares that the Kabbalah provides "an anatomy of genius." Without explaining this notion, he observes that the Kabbalistic scholar Gershom Scholem found that Franz Kafka's writing possesses "something of the strong light of the canonical, of that perfection which destroys." This is not an idea easily apprehended, but Bloom does not explain this, either. Instead he adds that Scholem's successor, Moshe Idel, believed that the canonical is "the perfection which absorbs." If there is disagreement even among the Kabbalistic scholars Bloom cites, the reader can hardly be blamed for feeling at a loss after only half a page.

Supposedly the Sefirot , or symbols of the Kabbalah, provide a structure for grouping authors together by fives, but these divisions are like the rules of a made-up game. They reflect not an underlying truth about these authors' works but rather Bloom's past scholarship and predilections. He confesses before he begins that any of the writers studied could almost as easily belong to any of the groupings he has constructed. Consequently, there is no deep and systematic exploration of the nature of genius, but rather a string of largely separate pronouncements on one author after the next. The ambitious and largely ineffective framework is almost entirely dispensable. The book has value only when Bloom engages directly with an author and allows us to participate in his elation. Endearingly, he compares reading to falling in love: It's better, he claims, because the emotional cost is so much less.

As a reader of a particular beloved text, Bloom can be invaluable, in part simply because he has read so much. He has a genius for quotation—both from secondary material, such as letters and conversations that reveal an author's nature, and from the literary passages that embody an author's merits. Bloom quotes a defining observation by English essayist Walter Pater: "For [Plato] all knowledge is like knowing a person." He then adds, with striking succinctness, "Walter Pater summed up Romantic tradition in what he knew had become Charles Darwin's world." This ability to place an author in context in a single sentence could well serve the common reader, if so much else were not pretentious or obscure.

Bloom also shares the remarkable gleanings of his biographical research. He gives us, for example, Leo Tolstoy's affectionate comment on Anton Chekhov: "Ah, what a beautiful, magnificent man; modest and quiet like a girl." He recalls Robert Louis Stevenson's remark that he was "not surprised that [Henry David] Thoreau got along best with fish." And he tells us that Walt Whitman referred to Alfred, Lord Tennyson as "the boss."

Although he does not rank his geniuses, there are a quintet of authors described by Bloom as those who "dominate their genre," consisting of Shakespeare, Miguel de Cervantes, Michel de Montaigne, John Milton and Tolstoy. Bloom hedges by referring to Milton as the master of "the secondary or postclassical epic," but this qualification amounts to an admission. Would not Homer, who crops up elsewhere, be a better choice? Perhaps the vagaries of Bloom's selections—he includes Hart Crane, Eugenio Montale and Iris Murdoch in the book, but not Petrarch, Nikolai Gogol or Vladimir Nabokov—are in a way inevitable.

The chief problem with these groupings is that authors are bound together like contestants in a three-legged race. What end, for example, is served by herding together Honoré de Balzac, Lewis Carroll, Henry James, Robert Browning and William Butler Yeats? The heading of the section is " Malkhut ," which means "kingdom," but this seems to boil down to the pedestrian idea that each of these authors creates a world. What author of genius does not?

No list could please everyone. Indeed, a worse fate than exclusion befalls authors whom Bloom includes but dislikes, chief among them Edith Wharton and Charlotte Brontë. Recoiling from what he calls "the phallic cudgel" of Brontë's style, Bloom feels the author is "bashing me over the head," an observation he never makes when an author of genius, however domineering, is in actual possession of a phallus. Wharton, whose "unpleasant genius" penetrates "the war between men and women," in Bloom's skittish view, is ultimately dismissed: "Perhaps Wharton was only a near-genius.... If her literary achievement needs to be bolstered, in our current fashion, by gender concerns and sociological contexts, then it would fall short of the qualities of innovation and continual freshness that genius ought to encompass."

Arguably this debate should have preceded her selection, but it does hint at a possible, almost incredible, purpose of this book. Apparently Bloom, who concludes the volume by calling the present "a bad time that deprecates genius," is trying to defend the whole idea of genius from what he regards as the destructive incursions of political correctness and the inflated value of works by women and people of color. "Without genius, literary language stales quickly, and resists revival, even upon the sacred grounds of gender, ethnicity, skin pigmentation, sexual orientation, and all the other criteria that dominate our media, including their sub-branch, our campuses." This is Bloom's parting shot, but he needn't have bothered. Genius always manages to earn its keep. Readers don't hang on to Shakespeare and Charles Dickens because critics tell us those authors are geniuses, but because they meet a living need. Bloom's joy in what he reads reminds us of this. His fulminations and Kabbalistic systems only get in the way. —Penelope Mesic

Publishers Weekly
With The Western Canon, Yale-based critical eminence Bloom tapped into a strain of the cultural zeitgeist looking for authoritative takes on what to read. Bloom here follows up with 6-10 pages each on 100 "geniuses" of literature (all deceased) pointing to the major works, outlining the major achievements therein, showing us how to recognize them for ourselves. Despite the book's length, Bloom's mostly male geniuses are, as he notes "certainly not `the top one hundred' in anyone's judgement, my own included. I wanted to write about these." Bloom backs up his choices with such effortless and engaging erudition that their idiosyncrasy and casualness become strengths. While organized under the rubric of the 10 Kabalistic Sefirot, "attributes at once of God and of Adam Kadmon or Divine Man, God's Image," Bloom's chosen figures are associated by his own brilliant (and sometimes jabbingly provocative) forms of attention, from a linkage of Dr. Johnson, Goethe and Freud to one of Dickens, Celan and Ellison (with a few others in between them). A pleasant surprise is the plethora of lesser-known Latin American authors, from Luz Vaz de Camoes to Jos Maria E a de Queiroz and Alejo Carpentier. Many familiar greats are here, too, as is a definition of genius. "This book is not a work of analysis or of close reading, but of surmise and juxtaposition," Bloom writes, and as such readers will find it appropriately enthusiastic and wild. (Oct. 22) Forecast: With the dismantling of Oprah's Book Club, and none of the contenders stepping up convincingly, look for this book to fill the void, particularly as a gift book. A five-city East Coast tour will add some awareness, and national reviews will build on it, but getting the voluble Bloom on morning television and letting him riff would be the clincher. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Bloom, a distinguished and often controversial literary critic and best-selling author of numerous books about literature (e.g., How To Read and Why), explores the concept of literary genius through the ages by examining 100 writers. Aside from such "must includes" as Shakespeare, Dante, Cervantes, Homer, Virgil, and Plato, Bloom offers some perhaps less well known to American readers, such as Lady Murasaki and Octavio Paz, acknowledging that his selections are idiosyncratic and were chosen because he wanted to write about certain authors, not because they were necessarily in "the top one hundred." In the introduction, Bloom posits a definition of genius that is fleshed out in his discussion of each writer. Authors are clustered into Lustres, or groups of five, while a brief introduction to each section explains why the writers in the section are associated with one another. (Each of the Lustres is based on one of the common names for the Kabbalistic Sefirot, which Bloom describes as representing God's creativity or genius.) Although the book is a delight to read, its real value lies in the author's ability to provoke the reader into thinking about literature, genius, and related topics. No similar work discusses literary genius in this way or covers this many writers. Recommended for public and academic libraries.-Shana C. Fair, Ohio Univ. Lib., Zanesville Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A fresh installment in Bloom's Adleresque campaign to dust off the Western Civ 101 syllabus for a generation of readers led astray by the "impostors" running the academy. "Genius," Bloom (How to Read and Why, 2000, etc.) allows, is a slippery term: it is "a mystery of the capacious consciousness"; it is "idiosyncratic and grandly arbitrary, and ultimately stands alone"; it is revealed in, well, works of genius of the sort that the contemporary university seems to have little room for-in, say, the poems of Eliot, the dramas of Shakespeare, the sermons of Donne. Never mind the apparent circularity of the argument, for here Bloom collects deeply learned remarks, critical and biographical, on a cluster of a hundred shapers and makers of the Western mind as, he suggests, it ought to be. Only a few of them are non-Western: the sole representative of Asia is Lady Murasaki, author of the medieval Tale of Genji; Muhammad represents the Arab world; Africa goes entirely unrepresented. But Bloom is inclusive, at least in his own way; grouping his hundred authors by a complex-and certainly idiosyncratic-classificatory system of perceived affinities, one that derives from the Kabbalah and certain Gnostic texts, he finds room for moderns such as Tennessee Williams and Wallace Stevens, for Hispanic writers such as Octavio Paz and Alejo Carpentier, for women such as Christina Rossetti and Flannery O'Connor alongside the usual dead white males of the European canon. Bloom's system will likely be more meaningful to Bloom than his readers, but it's refreshing all the same to see Herman Melville cast alongside Virginia Woolf, Robert Browning alongside Lewis Carroll, Homer alongside James Joyce by virtue oftheir writerly interests. Bloom's biographical sketches are satisfyingly offbeat, if sometimes so allusive as to assume wide background reading: "The sage of Vienna, who intended to become no less than a new Moses, replacing Judaism by psychoanalysis, became instead a new Prospero, but one who would not break his staff or drown his book." Still, readers suitably prepared for Bloom, and of a hell-in-a-handbasket cast of mind with respect to the current culture, will find this a rewarding excursion.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446691291
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 6/21/2010
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 832
  • Sales rank: 684,718
  • Age range: 13 years
  • Product dimensions: 8.64 (w) x 5.56 (h) x 1.79 (d)

Meet the Author

Harold Bloom
Harold Bloom
One of our most popular, respected, and controversial literary critics, Yale University professor Harold Bloom’s books – about, variously, Shakespeare, the Bible, and the classic literature – are as erudite as they are accessible.

Biography

"Authentic literature doesn't divide us," the scholar and literary critic Harold Bloom once said. "It addresses itself to the solitary individual or consciousness." Revered and sometimes reviled as a champion of the Western canon, Bloom insists on the importance of reading authors such as Shakespeare, Milton, and Chaucer -- not because they transmit certain approved cultural values, but because they transcend the limits of culture, and thus enlarge rather than constrict our sense of what it means to be human. As Bloom explained in an interview, "Shakespeare is the true multicultural author. He exists in all languages. He is put on the stage everywhere. Everyone feels that they are represented by him on the stage."

Bloom began his career by tackling the formidable legacy of T.S. Eliot, who had dismissed the English Romantic poets as undisciplined nature-worshippers. Bloom construed the Romantic poets' visions of immortality as rebellions against nature, and argued that an essentially Romantic imagination was still at work in the best modernist poets.

Having restored the Romantics to critical respectability, Bloom advanced a more general theory of poetry. His now-famous The Anxiety of Influence argued that any strong poem is a creative "misreading" of the poet's predecessor. The book raised, as the poet John Hollander wrote, "profound questions about... how the prior visions of other poems are, for a true poet, as powerful as his own dreams and as formative as his domestic childhood." In addition to developing this theory, Bloom wrote several books on sacred texts. In The Book of J, he suggested that some of the oldest parts of the Bible were written by a woman.

The Book of J was a bestseller, but it was the 1994 publication of The Western Canon that made the critic-scholar a household name. In it, Bloom decried what he called the "School of Resentment" and the use of political correctness as a basis for judging works of literature. His defense of the threatened canon formed, according to The New York Times, a "passionate demonstration of why some writers have triumphantly escaped the oblivion in which time buries almost all human effort."

Bloom placed Shakespeare along with Dante at the center of the Western canon, and he made another defense of Shakespeare's centrality with Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, an illuminating study of Shakespeare's plays. How to Read and Why (2000) revisited Shakespeare and other writers in the Bloom pantheon, and described the act of reading as both a spiritual exercise and an aesthetic pleasure.

Recently, Bloom took up another controversial stance when he attacked Harry Potter in an essay for The Wall Street Journal. His 2001 book Stories and Poems for Extremely Intelligent Children of All Ages advanced an alternative to contemporary children's lit, with a collection of classic works of literature "worthy of rereading" by people of all ages.

The poet and editor David Lehman said that "while there are some critics who are known for a certain subtlety and a certain judiciousness, there are other critics... who radiate ferocious passion." Harold Bloom is a ferociously passionate reader for whom literary criticism is, as he puts it, "the art of making what is implicit in the text as finely explicit as possible."

Good To Know

Bloom earned his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1955 and was hired as a Yale faculty member that same year. In 1965, at the age of 35, he became one of the youngest scholars in Yale history to be appointed full professor in the department of English. He is now Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale and Berg Visiting Professor of English at New York University.

Though some conservative commentators embraced Bloom's canon as a return to traditional moral values, Bloom, who once styled himself "a Truman Democrat," dismisses attempts by both left- and right-wingers to politicize literature. "To read in the service of any ideology is not, in my judgment, to read at all," he told a New York Times interviewer.

His great affinity for Shakespeare has put Bloom in the unlikely position of stage actor on occasion; he has played his "literary hero," port-loving raconteur Sir John Falstaff, in three productions.

Bloom is married to Jeanne, a retired school psychologist whom he met while a junior faculty member at Yale in the 1950s. They have two sons.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Harold Irving Bloom (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      New York, New York and New Haven, Connecticut
    1. Date of Birth:
      July 11, 1930
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A., Cornell University, 1951; Ph.D., Yale University, 1955

Read an Excerpt

INTRODUCTION

 

What Is Genius?

 

In employing a Kabbalistic grid or paradigm in the arrangement of this book, I rely upon Gershom Scholem's conviction that Kabbalah is the genius of religion in the Jewish tradition. My one hundred figures, from Shakespeare through the late Ralph Ellison, represent perhaps a hundred different stances towards spirituality, covering the full range from Saint Paul and Saint Augustine to the secularism of Proust and Calvino. But Kabbalah, in my view, provides an anatomy of genius, both of women and of men; as also of their merging in Ein Sof, the endlessness of God. Here I want to use Kabbalah as a starting-point in my own personal vision of the name and nature of genius.

Scholem remarked that the work of Franz Kafka constituted a secular Kabbalah, and so he concluded that Kafka's writings possess "something of the strong light of the canonical, of that perfection which destroys." Against this, Moshe Idel has argued that the canonical, both scriptural and Kabbalistic, is "the perfection which absorbs." To confront the plenitude of Bible, Talmud, and Kabbalah is to work at "absorbing perfections."

What Idel calls "the absorbing quality of the Torah" is akin to the absorbing quality of all authentic genius, which always has the capacity to absorb us. In American English, to "absorb" means several related processes: to take something in as through the pores, or to engross one's full interest or attention, or to assimilate fully.

I am aware that I transfer to genius what Scholem and Idel follow Kabbalah in attributing to God, but I merely extend the ancient Roman tradition that first established the ideas of genius and of authority. In Plutarch, Mark Antony's genius is the god Bacchus or Dionysus. Shakespeare, in his Antony and Cleopatra, has the god Hercules, as Antony's genius, abandon him. The emperor Augustus, who defeated Antony, proclaimed that the god Apollo was his genius, according to Suetonius. The cult of the emperor's genius thus became Roman ritual, displacing the two earlier meanings, of the family's fathering force and of each individual's alter ego.

Authority, another crucial Roman concept, may be more relevant for the study of genius than "genius," with its contradictory meanings, still can hope to be. Authority, which has vanished from Western culture, was convincingly traced by Hannah Arendt to Roman rather than Greek or Hebrew origins. In ancient Rome, the concept of authority was foundational. Auctoritas derived from the verb augere, "to augment," and authority always depended upon augmenting the foundation, thus carrying the past alive into the present.

Homer fought a concealed contest with the poetry of the past, and I suspect that the Redactor of the Hebrew Bible, putting together his Genesis through Kings structure in Babylon, struggled to truncate the earliest author that he wove into the text, in order to hold off the strangeness and uncanny power of the Yahwist or J writer. The Yahwist could not be excluded, because his (or her) stories possessed authority, but the disconcerting Yahweh, human-all-too-human, could be muted by other voices of the divine. What is the relationship of fresh genius to a founded authority? At this time, starting the twenty-first century, I would say: "Why, none, none at all." Our confusions about canonical standards for genius are now institutionalized confusions, so that all judgments as to the distinction between talent and genius are at the mercy of the media, and obey cultural politics and its vagaries.

Since my book, by presenting a mosaic of a hundred authentic geniuses, attempts to provide criteria for judgment, I will venture here upon a purely personal definition of genius, one that hopes to be useful for the early years of this new century. Whether charisma necessarily attends genius seems to me problematic. Of my hundred figures in this book, I had met three—Iris Murdoch, Octavio Paz, Ralph Ellison—who died relatively recently. Farther back, I recall brief meetings with Robert Frost and Wallace Stevens. All of them impressive, in different ways, they lacked the flamboyance and authority of Gershom Scholem, whose genius attended him palpably, despite his irony and high good humor.

William Hazlitt wrote an essay on persons one would wish to have known. I stare at my Kabbalistic table of contents, and wonder which I would choose. The critic Sainte-Beuve advised us to ask ourselves: what would this author I read have thought of me? My particular hero among these hundred is Dr. Samuel Johnson, the god of literary criticism, but I do not have the courage to face his judgment.

Genius asserts authority over me, when I recognize powers greater than my own. Emerson, the sage I attempt to follow, would disapprove of my pragmatic surrender, but Emerson's own genius was so large that he plausibly could preach Self-Reliance. I myself have taught continuously for forty-six years, and wish I could urge an Emersonian self-reliance upon my students, but I can't and don't, for the most part. I hope to nurture genius in them, but can impart only a genius for appreciation. That is the prime purpose of this book: to activate the genius of appreciation in my readers, if I can.

These pages are written a week after the September 11, 2001, terrorist triumph in destroying the World Trade Center and the people trapped within it. During the last week I have taught scheduled classes on Wallace Stevens and Elizabeth Bishop, on Shakespeare's early comedies, and on the Odyssey. I cannot know whether I helped my students at all, but I momentarily held off my own trauma, by freshly appreciating genius.

What is it that I, and many others, appreciate in genius? An entry in Emerson's Journals (October 27, 1831) always hovers in my memory:

Is it not all in us, how strangely! Look at this congregation of men;— the words might be spoken,—though now there be none here to speak them,—but the words might be said that would make them stagger and reel like a drunken man. Who doubts it? Were you ever instructed by a wise and eloquent man? Remember then, were not the words that made your blood run cold, that brought the blood to your cheeks, that made you tremble or delighted you,—did they not sound to you as old as yourself? Was it not truth that you knew before, or do you ever expect to be moved from the pulpit or from man by anything but plain truth? Never. It is God in you that responds to God without, or affirms his own words trembling on the lips of another.

It still burns into me: "did they not sound to you as old as yourself?" The ancient critic Longinus called literary genius the Sublime, and saw its operation as a transfer of power from author to reader:

Touched by the true sublime your soul is naturally lifted up, she rises to a proud height, is filled with joy and vaunting, as if she had herself created this thing that she has heard.

Literary genius, difficult to define, depends upon deep reading for its verification. The reader learns to identify with what she or he feels is a greatness that can be joined to the self, without violating the self 's integrity. "Greatness" may be out of fashion, as is the transcendental, but it is hard to go on living without some hope of encountering the extraordinary.

Meeting the extraordinary in another person is likely to be deceptive or delusionary. We call it "falling in love," and the verb is a warning. To confront the extraordinary in a book-be it the Bible, Plato, Shakespeare, Dante, Proust—is to benefit almost without cost. Genius, in its writings, is our best path for reaching wisdom, which I believe to be the true use of literature for life.

James Joyce, when asked, "Which one book on a desert island?", replied, "I would like to answer Dante, but I would have to take the Englishman, because he is richer." The Joycean Irish edge against the English is given adequate expression, but the choice of Shakespeare is just, which is why he leads off the hundred figures in this book. Though there are a few literary geniuses who approach Shakespeare—the Yahwist, Homer, Plato, Dante, Chaucer, Cervantes, Moli?re, Goethe, Tolstoy, Dickens, Proust, Joyce— even those dozen masters of representation do not match Shakespeare's miraculous rendering of reality. Because of Shakespeare we see what otherwise we could not see, since we are made different. Dante, the nearest rival, persuades us of the terrible reality of his Inferno and his Purgatorio, and almost induces us to accept his Paradiso. Yet even the fullest of the Divine Comedy's persons, Dante the Poet-Pilgrim, does not cross over from the Comedy's pages into the world we inhabit, as do Falstaff, Hamlet, Iago, Macbeth, Lear, Cleopatra.

The invasion of our reality by Shakespeare's prime personages is evidence for the vitality of literary characters, when created by genius. We all know the empty sensation we experience when we read popular fiction and find that there are only names upon the page, but no persons. In time, however overpraised, such fictions become period pieces, and finally rub down into rubbish. It is worth knowing that our word "character" still possesses, as a primary meaning, a graphic sign such as a letter of the alphabet, reflecting the word's likely origin in the ancient Greek character, a sharp stylus or the mark of the stylus's incisions. Our modern word "character" also means ethos, a habitual stance towards life.

It was fashionable, quite recently, to talk about "the death of the author," but this too has become rubbish. The dead genius is more alive than we are, just as Falstaff and Hamlet are considerably livelier than many people I know. Vitality is the measure of literary genius. We read in search of more life, and only genius can make that available to use.

What makes genius possible? There always is a Spirit of the Age, and we like to delude ourselves that what matters most about any memorable figure is what he or she shared with a particular era. In this delusion, which is both academic and popular, everyone is regarded as being determined by societal factors. Individual imagination yields to social anthropology or to mass psychology, and thus can be explained away.

I base this book, Genius, upon my belief that appreciation is a better mode for the understanding of achievement than are all the analytical kinds of accounting for the emergence of exceptional individuals. Appreciation may judge, but always with gratitude, and frequently with awe and wonder.

By "appreciation" I mean something more than "adequate esteem." Need also enters into it, in the particular sense of turning to the genius of others in order to redress a lack in oneself, or finding in genius a stimulus to one's own powers, whatever these may emerge as being.

Appreciation may modulate into love, even as your consciousness of a dead genius augments consciousness itself. Your solitary self 's deepest desire is for survival, whether in the here and now, or transcendentally elsewhere. To be augmented by the genius of others is to enhance the possibilities of survival, at least in the present and the near future.

We do not know how and/or why genius is possible, only that—to our massive enrichment—it has existed, and perhaps (waningly) continues to appear. Though our academic institutions abound in impostors who proclaim that genius is a capitalistic myth, I am content to cite Leon Trotsky, who urged Communist writers to read and study Dante. If genius is a mystery of the capacious consciousness, what is least mysterious about it is an intimate connection with personality rather than with character. Dante's personality is forbidding, Shakespeare's elusive, while Jesus' (like the fictive Hamlet's) seems to reveal itself differently to every reader or auditor.

What is personality? Alas, we use it now as a popular synonym for celebrity, but I would argue that we cannot give the word up to the realm of buzz. When we know enough about the biography of a particular genius, then we understand what is meant by the personality of Goethe or Byron or Freud or Oscar Wilde. Conversely, when we lack biographical inwardness, then we all agree that we are uncertain as to Shakespeare's personality, an enormous paradox since his plays may have invented personality as we now most readily comprehend it. If challenged, I could write a book on the personality of Hamlet, Falstaff, or Cleopatra, but I would not attempt a book upon the personality of Shakespeare or of Jesus.

Benjamin Disraeli's father, the man of letters Isaac D'Israeli, wrote an amiable volume called The Literary Character of Men of Genius, one of the precursors to this book, Genius, together with Plutarch's Parallel Lives, Emerson's Representative Men, and Carlyle's On Heroes and Hero-Worship. Isaac D'Israeli remarks that "many men of genius must arise before a particular man of genius can appear." Every genius has forerunners, though far enough back in time we may not know who they are. Dr. Johnson considered Homer to have been the first and most original of poets; we tend to see Homer as a relative latecomer, enriching himself with the phrases and formulas of his predecessors. Emerson, in his essay "Quotation and Originality," slyly observed, "Only an inventor knows how to borrow."

The great inventions of genius influence that genius itself in ways we are slow to appreciate. We speak of the man or woman in the work; we might better speak of the work in the person. And yet we scarcely know how to discuss the influence of a work upon its author, or of a mind upon itself. I take that to be the principal enterprise of this book. With all of the figures I depict in this mosaic, my emphasis will be on the contest they conducted with themselves.

That agon with the self can mask itself as something else, including the inspiration of idealized forerunners: Plato's Socrates, Confucius's the Duke of Chou, the Buddha's earlier incarnations. Particularly the inventor of the Hebrew Bible as we know it, the Redactor of the sequence from Genesis through Kings, relies upon his own genius at reimagining the Covenant even as he honors the virtues (and failings) of the fathers. And yet, as Donald Harmon Akenson argues, the inventor-redactor or writer-editor achieved a "surpassing wonder," utterly his own. This exile in Babylon could not have thought that he was creating Scripture; as the first historian he perhaps believed only that he was forwarding the lost cause of the Kingdom of Judah. And yet he seems too cunning not to have seen that his invention of a continuity and so of a tradition was largely his own.

With the Redactor, as with Confucius or with Plato, we can sense an anxiety in the work that must have communicated itself to the man. How can one be worthy of the fathers with whom Yahweh spoke, face-to-face, or of the great Duke of Chou, who gave order to the people without imposing it upon them by violence? Is it possible to be the authentic disciple of Socrates, who suffered martyrdom without complaint, in order to affirm his truth? The ultimate anxiety of influence always may be, not that one's proper space has been usurped already, but that greatness may be unable to renew itself, that one's inspiration may be larger than one's own powers of realization.

Genius is no longer a term much favored by scholars, so many of whom have become cultural levelers quite immune from awe. Yet, with the public, the idea of genius maintains its prestige, even though the word itself can seem somewhat tarnished. We need genius, however envious or uncomfortable it makes many among us. It is not necessary that we aspire after genius for ourselves, and yet, in our recesses, we remember that we had, or have, a genius. Our desire for the transcendental and extraordinary seems part of our common heritage, and abandons us slowly, and never completely.

To say that the work is in the writer, or the religious idea is in the charismatic leader, is not a paradox. Shakespeare, we happen to know, was a usurer. So was Shylock, but did that help to keep The Merchant of Venice a comedy? We don't know. But to look for the work in the writer is to look for the influence and effect of the play upon Shakespeare's development from comedy to tragicomedy to tragedy. It is to see Shylock darkening Shakespeare. To examine the effects of his own parables upon the figure of Jesus is to conduct a parallel exploration.

There are two ancient (Roman) meanings of the word "genius," which are rather different in emphasis. One is to beget, cause to be born, that is to be a paterfamilias. The other is to be an attendant spirit for each person or place: to be either a good or evil genius, and so to be someone who, for better or for worse, strongly influences someone else. This second meaning has been more important than the first; our genius is thus our inclination or natural gift, our inborn intellectual or imaginative power, not our power to beget power in others.

We all learn to distinguish, firmly and definitively, between genius and talent. A "talent" classically was a weight or sum of money, and as such, however large, was necessarily limited. But "genius," even in its linguistic origins, has no limits.

We tend now to regard genius as the creative capacity, as opposed to talent. The Victorian historian Froude observed that genius "is a spring in which there is always more behind than flows from it." The largest instances of genius that we know, aesthetically, would include Shakespeare and Dante, Bach and Mozart, Michelangelo and Rembrandt, Donatello and Rodin, Alberti and Brunelleschi. A greater complexity ensues when we attempt to confront religious genius, particularly in a religion-obsessed country like the United States. To regard Jesus and Muhammad as religious geniuses (whatever else they were) makes them, in that regard only, akin not only to one another but to Zoroaster and the Buddha, and to such secular figures of ethical genius as Confucius and Socrates.

Defining genius more precisely than has yet been done is one of my objectives in this book. Another is to defend the idea of genius, currently abused by detractors and reductionists, from sociobiologists through the materialists of the genome school, and on to various historicizers. But my primary aim is both to enhance our appreciation of genius, and to show how invariably it is engendered by the stimulus of prior genius, to a much greater degree than it is by cultural and political contexts. The influence of genius upon itself, already mentioned, will be one of the book's major emphases.

My subject is universal, not so much because world-altering geniuses have existed, and will come again, but because genius, however repressed, exists in so many readers. Emerson thought that all Americans were potential poets and mystics. Genius does not teach how to read or whom to read, but rather how to think about exemplary human lives at their most creative.

It will be noted in the table of contents that I have excluded any living instances of genius, and have dealt with only three recently dead. In this book I am compelled to be brief and summary in my account of individual genius, because I believe that much is to be learned by juxtaposing many figures from varied cultures and contrasting eras. The differences between a hundred men and women, drawn from a span of twenty-five centuries, overwhelm the analogies or similarities, and to present them within a single volume may seem the enterprise of an overreacher. And yet there are common characteristics to genius, since vivid individuality of speculation, spirituality, and creativity must rely upon originality, audacity, and selfreliance.

Emerson, in his Representative Men, begins with a heartening paragraph:

It is natural to believe in great men. If the companions of our childhood should turn out to be heroes, and their condition regal, it will not surprise us. All mythology opens with demigods, and the circumstance is high and poetic; that is, their genius is paramount. In the legends of Gautama, the first men ate the earth, and found it deliciously sweet.

Gautama, the Buddha, quests for and attains freedom, as though he were one of the first men. Emerson's twice-told tale is a touch more American than Buddhist; his first men seem American Adams, and not reincarnations of previous enlightenments. Perhaps I too can only Americanize, but that may be the paramount use of past geniuses; we have to adapt them to our place and our time, if we are to be enlightened or inspired by them.

Emerson had six great or representative men: Plato, Swedenborg, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Napoleon, and Goethe. Four of these are in this book; Swedenborg is replaced by Blake, and Napoleon I have discarded with all other generals and politicians. Plato, Montaigne, Shakespeare, and Goethe remain essential, as do the others I sketch. Essential for what? To know ourselves, in relation to others, for these mighty dead are among the otherness that we can know, as Emerson tells us in Representative Men:

We need not fear excessive influence. A more generous trust is permitted. Serve the great.

And yet this is the conclusion of his book:

The world is young: the former great men call to us affectionately. We too must write Bibles, to unite again the heavens and the earthly world. The secret of genius is to suffer no fiction to exist for us; to realize all that we know.

To realize all that we know, fictions included, is too large an enterprise for us, a wounded century and a half after Emerson. The world no longer seems young, and I do not always hear the accents of affection when the voices of genius call out to me. But then I have the disadvantage, and the advantage, of coming after Emerson. The genius of influence transcends its constituent anxieties, provided we become aware of them and then surmise where we stand in relation to their continuing prevalence.

Thomas Carlyle, a Victorian Scottish genius now out of fashion, wrote an admirable study that almost nobody reads anymore, On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the Heroic in History. It contains the best remark on Shakespeare that I know:

If called to define Shakespeare's faculty, I should say superiority of intellect, and think I had included all under that.

Adumbrating the observation, Carlyle characteristically exploded into a very useful warning against dividing any genius into its illusory components:

What indeed are faculties? We talk of faculties as if they were distinct, things separable; as if a man had intellect, imagination, fancy, etc. as he had hands, feet and arms.

"Power of Insight," Carlyle continued, was the vital force in any one of us. How do we recognize that insight or force in genius? We have the works of genius, and we have the memory of their personalities. I use that last word with high deliberation, following Walter Pater, another Victorian genius, but one who defies fashion, because he is akin to Emerson and to Nietzsche. These three subtle thinkers prophesied much of the intellectual future of our century that has just passed, and are unlikely to fade as influences during the new century. Pater's preface to his major book, The Renaissance, emphasizes that the "aesthetic critic" ("aesthetic" meaning "perceptive") identifies genius in every era:

In all ages there have been some excellent workmen, and some excellent work done. The question he asks is always:-In whom did it stir, the genius, the sentiment of the period find itself? Where was the receptacle of his refinement, its elevation, its taste? "The ages are all equal," says William Blake, "but genius is always above its age."

Blake, a visionary genius almost without peer, is a superb guide to the relative independence that genius manifests in regard to time: it "is always above its age." We cannot confront the twenty-first century without expecting that it too will give us a Stravinsky or Louis Armstrong, a Picasso or Matisse, a Proust or James Joyce. To hope for a Dante or Shakespeare, a J. S. Bach or Mozart, a Michelangelo or Leonardo, is to ask for too much, since gifts that enormous are very rare. Yet we want and need what will rise above the twenty-first century, whatever that turns out to be.

The use of my mosaic is that it ought to help prepare us for this new century, by summoning up aspects of the personality and achievements of many of the most creative who have come before us. The ancient Roman made an offering to his genius on his birthday, dedicating that day to "the god of human nature," as the poet Horace called each person's tutelary spirit. Our custom of a birthday cake is in direct descent from that offering. We light the candles and might do well to remember what it is that we are celebrating.

GENIUS :

 

A Personal Definition

 

I have avoided all living geniuses in this book, partly so as to evade the distractions of mere provocation. I can identify for myself certain writers of palpable genius now among us: the Portuguese novelist Jos? Saramago, the Canadian poet Anne Carson, the English poet Geoffrey Hill, and at least a halfdozen North and Latin American novelists and poets (whom I forbear naming).

Pondering my mosaic of one hundred exemplary creative minds, I arrive at a tentative and personal definition of literary genius. The question of genius was a perpetual concern of Ralph Waldo Emerson, who is the mind of America, as Walt Whitman is its poet, and Henry James its novelist (its dramatist is yet to come). For Emerson, genius was the God within, the self of "Self-Reliance." That self, in Emerson, therefore is not constituted by history, by society, by languages. It is aboriginal. I altogether agree.

Shakespeare, the supreme genius, is different in kind from his contemporaries, even from Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson. Cervantes stands apart from Lope de Vega, and Calder?n. Something in Shakespeare and Cervantes, as in Dante, Montaigne, Milton, and Proust (to give only a few instances), is clearly both of and above the age.

Fierce originality is one crucial component of literary genius, but this originality itself is always canonical, in that it recognizes and comes to terms with precursors. Even Shakespeare makes an implicit covenant with Chaucer, his essential forerunner at inventing the human.

If genius is the God within, I need to seek it there, in the abyss of the aboriginal self, an entity unknown to nearly all our current Explainers, in the intellectually forlorn universities and in the media's dark Satanic mills. Emerson and ancient Gnosticism agree that what is best and oldest in each of us is no part of the Creation, no part of Nature or the Not-Me. Each of us presumably can locate what is best in herself or himself, but how do we find what is oldest?

Where does the self begin? The Freudian answer is that the ego makes an investment in itself, which thus centers a self. Shakespeare calls our sense of identity the "selfsame"; when did Jack Falstaff become Falstaff? When did Shakespeare become Shakespeare? The Comedy of Errors is already a work of genius, yet who could have prophesied Twelfth Night on the basis of that early farce? Our recognition of genius is always retroactive, but how does genius first recognize itself?

The ancient answer is that there is a god within us, and the god speaks. I think that a materialist definition of genius is impossible, which is why the idea of genius is so discredited in an age like our own, where materialist ideologies dominate. Genius, by necessity, invokes the transcendental and the extraordinary, because it is fully conscious of them. Consciousness is what defines genius: Shakespeare, like his Hamlet, exceeds us in consciousness, goes beyond the highest order of consciousness that we are capable of knowing without him.

Gnosticism, by definition, is a knowing rather than a believing. In Shakespeare, we have neither a knower nor a believer, but a consciousness so capacious that we cannot find its rival elsewhere: in Cervantes or Montaigne, in Freud or in Wittgenstein. Those who choose (or are chosen) by one of the world religions frequently posit a cosmic consciousness to which they assign supernatural origins. But Shakespearean consciousness, which transmutes matter into imagination, does not need to violate nature. Shakespeare's art is itself nature, and his consciousness can seem more the product of his art than its producer.

There, at the end of the mind, we are stationed by Shakespearean genius: a consciousness shaped by all the consciousnesses that he imagined. He remains, presumably forever, our largest instance of the use of literature for life, which is the work of augmenting awareness.

Though Shakespeare's is the largest consciousness studied in this book, all the rest of these exemplary creative minds have contributed to the consciousness of their readers and auditors. The question we need to put to any writer must be: does she or he augment our consciousness, and how is it done? I find this a rough but effectual test: however I have been entertained, has my awareness been intensified, my consciousness widened and clarified? If not, then I have encountered talent, not genius. What is best and oldest in myself has not been activated.

 

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Table of Contents

Preface ix
On This Book's Arrangement: Genius and Kabbalah xi
The Lustres xv
Gnosticism: The Religion of Literature xvii
Introduction: What is Genius? 1
Genius: A Personal Definition 11
I. Keter 13
Lustre 1 William Shakespeare, Miguel de Cervantes, Michel de Montaigne, John Milton, Leo Tolstoy 15
Lustre 2 Lucretius, Vergil, Saint Augustine, Dante Alighieri, Geoffrey Chaucer 67
II. Hokmah 111
Lustre 3 The Yahwist, Socrates and Plato, Saint Paul, Muhammad 113
Lustre 4 Dr. Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Sigmund Freud, Thomas Mann 155
III. Binah 189
Lustre 5 Friedrich Nietzsche, Soren Kierkegaard, Franz Kafka, Marcel Proust, Samuel Beckett 191
Lustre 6 Moliere, Henrik Ibsen, Anton Chekhov, Oscar Wilde, Luigi Pirandello 225
IV. Hesed 257
Lustre 7 John Donne, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Jane Austen, Lady Murasaki 259
Lustre 8 Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Jane Bronte, Virginia Woolf 299
V. Din 333
Lustre 9 Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, T. S. Eliot 335
Lustre 10 William Wordsworth; Percy Bysshe Shelley; John Keats; Giacomo Leopardi; Alfred, Lord Tennyson 375
VI. Tiferet 419
Lustre 11 Algernon Charles Swinburne, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, Walter Pater, Hugo von Hofmannsthal 421
Lustre 12 Victor Hugo, Gerard de Nerval, Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Valery 455
VII. Nezah 497
Lustre 13 Homer, Luis Vaz de Camoes, James Joyce, Alejo Carpentier, Octavio Paz 499
Lustre 14 Stendhal, Mark Twain, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Flannery O'Connor 551
VIII. Hod 581
Lustre 15 Walt Whitman, Fernando Pessoa, Hart Crane, Federico Garcia Lorca, Luis Cernuda 583
Lustre 16 George Eliot, Willa Cather, Edith Wharton, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Iris Murdoch 619
IX. Yesod 651
Lustre 17 Gustave Flaubert, Jose Maria Eca de Queiroz, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino 653
Lustre 18 William Blake, D. H. Lawrence, Tennessee Williams, Rainer Maria Rilke, Eugenio Montale 693
X. Maikhut 729
Lustre 19 Honcre de Balzac, Lewis Carroll, Henry James, Robert Browning William Border Years 731
Lustre 20 Charles Dickens, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Isaac Babel, Paul Celan, Ralph Ellison 775
Coda: The Future of Genius 813
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2003

    Bloom's will to impose system is overdetermined

    A student once asked an Oxford University don, 'What is the philosophy of Bertrand Russell?' The professor replied, ¿Which year?¿ One might well say the same of Harold Bloom. A protean writer, Bloom resembles a chameleon whose shade of criticism shifts periodically to blend with his current obsession. Bloom has undergone at least four critical metamorphoses: from arch-Romantic (during his ¿Blakean period¿), to a strict Freudian phase (as shown in his legendary ¿anxiety of influence¿ theory), to Postmodernist guru (jumping onto the Francophile bandwagon with such force that he nearly overturned it), to cultural magus (as is his current state, exemplified by Genius, in which he issues edicts that display the fury of a fundamentalist preacher and the stern pronouncements of draconian law. Bloom has changed his mind so many times that those who attempt to plot the course of his views become vertiginous. In Genius, Bloom has written what he calls 'A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds.' The mosaic is of the geniuses of language, meaning that one will not find chapters on Newton, Einstein, Darwin, da Vinci, Edison, Beethoven, Mozart, or Bach. Bloom confesses that his choice is wholly arbitrary and idiosyncratic. 'No two souls,' he writes, 'ever agree upon what is most relevant to them.' To be fair, Bloom's elitist valuations are often on target. What serious book lover would disagree with his celebration of writers such as Shakespeare, Dante, Cervantes, Tolstoy, Milton, Chaucer, Homer, Virgil, Plato, Goethe, Freud, Nietzsche, Montaigne, Kierkegaard, Kafka, Proust, Joyce, Melville, Hawthorne, Emerson, Frost, Keats, Shelley, Tennyson, Twain, Faulkner, Whitman, Hugo, Dickens, and Dostoevsky? All of Bloom's one hundred literary geniuses are dead, and most of them are male. However, he does include a few female writers: Jane Austen, Charlotte and Emily Bronte, Willa Cather, Emily Dickinson, Iris Murdoch, Flannery O'Connor, Christina Rossetti, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf, and the only Asian in the book, Lady Murasaki. He also includes a dozen Latin American writers, most of whom are unknown to me. Some of my favorite writers, alas, are missing from Bloom's pantheon: Voltaire, Arthur Schopenhauer, Thomas Wolfe, Erskine Caldwell, John Dos Passos, Edgar Allan Poe, Theodore Dreiser, and John Steinbeck. An omnivorous reader and prolific writer, Bloom has enjoyed a publishing career that spans more than four decades. Although his erudition is beyond dispute, his pontifical and pretentious pronouncements often annoy, as if he were delivering the law from Mount Sinai or an oracle from Mount Olympus. The essays in this 814-page tome average eight pages in length. This would be a better book if Bloom had limited his selection to forty or fifty literary geniuses, thus allowing him to devote longer critiques to each writer. 'The question we need to put to any writer,' says Bloom, must be: does she or he augment our consciousness? I find this a rough but effectual test: however I have been entertained, has my awareness been intensified, my consciousness widened and clarified? If not, then I have encountered talent, not genius.' Bloom's more insightful revelations are the parallels he draws between writers in different centuries and the influence one creative spirit has had on another. The structure of the book is ludicrous. Bloom employs a highly dubious Kabbalistic grid in the arrangement of his selected geniuses. His ambition to impose system is arbitrary and overdetermined. Bloom has talent, but he does not have genius.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2002

    The reader as genius

    With this book Harold Bloom reaffirms the place he has already staked out for himself, as the most bold and ambitious literary critic of our time. He does this by surveying world literature and selecting from it the one ¿ hundred supreme literary geniuses , and in five or six pages for each discussing what defines the unique genius if each one .Each chapter has a short frontispiece in which he says something more general about the life and work of the individual creator , and a larger section in which he reads and interprets a selected piece of writing of the particular genius. His analysis and his own writing sparkle with aphoristic brilliance,with deep and broad knowledge , and with a rare capacity to make remarkable new connections between literary figures and worlds. Above all, the book is pervaded by his love of reading, his love of great imaginative literature .And the whole work is testament to and evidence of his total enthusiasm about and dedication to this world .Frequently in the work he mentions with a degree of modesty which would make Faustus proud, his knowing by heart vast sections of a particular literary masterpiece. This recalling time and again his own memorizing of particular works , is only one of the many obsessions which play such a large part in the work.Bloom does not remind repeating himself , tells us over and over again that he is seventy ¿ one , that to his regret he has lived to see the university world taken over by the politically correct.He rails against those curricula which select writers on basis of ethnic belonging, gender, race .He does not stop insisting that the great body of the media world, the popular culture, the university world is involved in nonsense and trivia.He presents himself as a kind of romantic hero , defending not only the literary greats he present, but the very idea of literary greatness, of genius of the imagination itself. And thus without declaring it openly , he presents himself as the one hundred and first genius of the work, the one who has come to rescue all the others .He is the the reader as genius who has come to save all the other geniuses from all the postmodern Foucalt ¿ Derrida deriders whose leveling spirit defines the mediocrity of the age. What is remarkable is how well Bloom does the work he sets out to do .And this first of all because his writing, line by line , writer by writer is truly alive, thought ¿ provoking and inspiring .In a sense an excellent review of this book could be made simply through citing its many great passages.. Bloom organizes his geniuses into groups of ten groups of ten ,each representing a Kabbalistic sphere or realm of emnation.They are then subdivided into groups of five each of which is called a ` lustre¿.Each lustre a term he takes from Emerson and Plutarch which means shining by reflected light, is meant to hint at the influence the geniuses grouped together have upon each other. This scheme which in one sense seems arbitrary , nonetheless often works to help him make interconnections which are often surprising and rich.For instance his first section in which he takes five of the greatest literary geniuses,Shakespeare,Cervantes,Montaigne,Milton Tolstoy ,is called Keter or Crown.It contains those geniuses each of which ` dominates his genre forever¿Bloom says Shakespeare was influenced by Montaigne and Cervantes,that Milton is ` uneasily ` influenced by Shakespeare,and that Tolstoy who ` hated Shakespeare ` nonethless knew how to in the novel of his old age, Hadji Murad use his influence in his varied characterizations. Here it is necessary to point out the special role Shakespeare plays in Bloom¿s literary world.Shakespeare is not as in Borges words , ¿ the one who created the most ¿ he is what for Bloom is most important in literary art,the supreme creator of character. Hamlet, Lear, Macbeth,Iago ,Falstaff, Rosalind , are fictional characters more memorable more living more immortal, in Bloom¿s judgment

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2011

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