Genocide and Human Rights

Overview

Genocide is both the gravest of crimes under international law and the ultimate violation of human rights. Recent years have seen major legal and political developments concerning genocide and other mass violations of rights. This collection brings together, for the first time, leading essays covering definitions, legislation, the sociology of genocide, prevention, humanitarian intervention, accountability, punishment and reconciliation.
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Overview

Genocide is both the gravest of crimes under international law and the ultimate violation of human rights. Recent years have seen major legal and political developments concerning genocide and other mass violations of rights. This collection brings together, for the first time, leading essays covering definitions, legislation, the sociology of genocide, prevention, humanitarian intervention, accountability, punishment and reconciliation.
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Part I Definitions and Legislation: Raphael Lemkin (1947), Genocide as a crime in international law
Matthew Lippman (1998), The convention on the prevention and punishment of the crime of genocide: fifty years later
Guglielmo Verdirame (2000), The genocide definition in the jurisprudence of the ad hoc tribunals
Catherine Mackinnon (1994), Rape, genocide and women's human rights
B. Van Schaack (1997), The crime of political genocide: repairing the genocide convention's blind spot. Part II Understanding Genocide and Mass Violations of Rights: Helen Fein (1978), A formula for genocide: comparison of the Turkish genocide (1915) and the German Holocaust (1939-45)
Benjamin Madley (2004) Patterns of frontier genocide 1803-1910: the Aboriginal Tasmanians, the Yuki of California, and the Herero of Namibia
William A. Schabas (2000), Hate speech in Rwanda: the road to genocide
Ervin Staub (1993), The psychology of bystanders, perpetrators, and heroic helpers
Michael Mann (2000), Were the perpetrators of genocide "ordinary men" or "real Nazis"? results from fifteen hundred biographies. Part III Preventing Genocide: Barbara Harff (2003), No lessons learned from the Holocaust? assessing risks of genocide and political mass murder since 1955
Louis René Beres (1988), Justice and realpolitik: international law and the prevention of genocide
Jack Donnelly (2002), Genocide and humanitarian intervention
Jonathan I. Charney (1999), Anticipatory humanitarian intervention in Kosovo
W. Michael Reisman (1996), Legal responses to genocide and other massive violations of human rights. Part IV Punishment and Reconciliation:Juan E. Mendez (1997), Accountability for past abuses
Stanley Cohen (1995), State crimes of previous regimes: knowledge, accountability, and policing of the past
David Wippman (1999-2000), Atrocities, deterrence and the limits of international justice
Israel W. Charny (2003), A classification of denials of the Holocaust and other genocides
John Borneman (2002), Reconciliation after ethnic cleansing: listening, retribution, affiliation
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