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Gentling
     

Gentling

4.7 4
by William E. Krill
 

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Breakthrough Treatment Offers New Hope for Recovery

Revised and Expanded 2nd Edition with 3 new chapters on adolescents

Gentling represents a new paradigm in the therapeutic approach to children who have experienced physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and have acquired Post Traumatic
Stress Disorder as a result. This text redefines PTSD in child

Overview

Breakthrough Treatment Offers New Hope for Recovery

Revised and Expanded 2nd Edition with 3 new chapters on adolescents

Gentling represents a new paradigm in the therapeutic approach to children who have experienced physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and have acquired Post Traumatic
Stress Disorder as a result. This text redefines PTSD in child abuse survivors by identifying child-specific behavioral signs commonly seen, and offers a means to individualize treatment and measure therapeutic outcomes through understanding each suffering child's unique symptom profile. The practical and easily understood Gentling approaches and techniques can be easily learned by clinicians, parents, foster parents, teachers and all other care givers of these children to effect real and lasting healing. With this book,
you will:

  • Learn child-specific signs of PTSD in abused children
  • Learn how to manage the often intense reactivity seen in stress episodes
  • Gain the practical, gentle, and effective treatment tools that really help these children
  • Use the Child Stress Profile (CSP) to guide treatment and measure outcomes
  • Deploy handy 'Quick Teach Sheets' that can be copied and handed to foster parents,
    teachers, and social workers

    Clinicians Acclaim for Gentling

    "In this world where children are often disenfranchised in trauma care--and all too often treated with the same techniques as adults--Krill makes a compelling case for how to adapt proven post-trauma treatment to the world of a child."

    --Michele Rosenthal, HealMyPTSD.com

    "Congratulations to Krill when he says that 'being gentle' cannot be over-emphasized in work with the abused."
    --Andrew D. Gibson, PhD
    Author of Got an Angry Kid? Parenting Spike, A Seriously Difficult Child

    "William Krill's book is greatly needed. PTSD is the most common aftermath of child abuse and often domestic abuse as well. There is a critical scarcity of mental-health professionals who know how to recognize child abuse, let alone treat it."

    --Fr. Heyward B. Ewart, III, Ph.D., St. James the Elder Theological Seminary,
    author of AM I BAD? Recovering From Abusew

    Cover photo by W.A. Krill/ Fighting Chance Photography

    Learn more at www.Gentling.org

    From the New Horizons in Therapy Series at Loving Healing Press www.LovingHealing.com

    FAM001010 Family & Relationships : Abuse - Child Abuse

    PSY022040 Psychology : Psychopathology - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    FAM004000 Family & Relationships : Adoption & Fostering

  • Product Details

    ISBN-13:
    9781615991068
    Publisher:
    Loving Healing Press
    Publication date:
    09/08/2011
    Pages:
    284
    Product dimensions:
    7.44(w) x 9.69(h) x 0.60(d)

    Customer Reviews

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    Gentling 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
    Tyler_TichelaarTT More than 1 year ago
    I did not read the first edition of “Gentling,” but this second edition states that the book has been revised and expanded and contains three new chapters on adolescents (teens). I thought this addition very practical and helpful because, as the book makes clear, treating children obviously requires different approaches based upon their ages, and the differences that are described are important to know. All of the advice and steps provided in this book were very practical and simple to follow, even if the situations where they would be applied would be far from simple, depending on the individual child. One key point I gathered from this book is that every child is different in the abuse he or she has received and the way a child may express his or her PTSD syndromes. For that reason specifically, it is important to be gentle with a child. That’s where the “gentling” approach to helping a child cope with and heal from PTSD comes in. I hesitate to give a definition of “gentling,” but it is basically about being both kind yet at times firm with a child, allowing a child to express him- or herself on a comfortable level, and finding ways to help the child express what needs to be said. Author William Krill offers plenty of advice and approaches to facilitating this level of communication from using toys for children to act out the experiences they had to being gentle in an adult’s approaches with children so as not to alarm them, such as asking permission to touch them, hug them, sit beside them, and even to move only halfway toward children so you do not frighten them and so they become comfortable with your presence. The PTSD children have encountered has a wide range, including being beaten and sexually abused or watching someone else be beaten, so violating a child’s boundaries through simple things like touching a child can result in a child undergoing a stress episode. Gentle care is constantly needed, and Krill provides ways to help children readapt to the world, learn whom they can trust, come to set boundaries for themselves, and differentiate themselves from others. While many of the techniques Krill suggests I’ve read about before, putting them all under the category of “gentling” provides a way to look at them from an overall approach and intention that is very helpful. The chapters on teenagers offered new information to me, and it was clear why that age group requires a different, yet still gentle approach, and how boundaries and rules remain important. One good suggestion Krill had was about making up a contract with a teenager. “Gentling” contains far more information than I can discuss here, but it will be especially helpful for parents and foster parents who need to recognize signs of PTSD and to differentiate between normal childhood behaviors and PTSD related behaviors. The book then offers plenty of advice on dealing with a wide range of individual behaviors from bed-wetting to playing with feces to bullying other children. Krill provides checklists for different possible behaviors that will help the reader to apply the material in a practical and easy way. The appendices in the book are especially helpful because even if the child’s primary caregiver may know how to help the child, other adults, especially teachers and school staff, may not. Krill provides a series of Quick Teach Sheets on numerous issues that range from about 2-3 pages each and can easily be copied to give adults.
    crazypsychobooklover More than 1 year ago
    Gentling will acquaint the reader with a breakthough treatment approach for children who have survived physical, emotional and sexual abuse. It is common knowledge that most children who have survived abuse will also have acquired Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). While PTSD adds an additional layer to the need for therapeutic work, it needn't make therapy an even more difficult or painful process for the child. PTSD takes many forms, and some of the symptoms seen in children may differ widely from adult PTSD symptoms. The Author of Gentling, William E. Krill, offers a groundbreaking and thorough look at the symptoms of PTSD in children, along with specific treatment modalities dependent on the individual child's symptomology. Written in an easy to use, understand and utilize format, Gentling will allow caring individuals, from parent, foster parent, caregiver, teacher, and clinician or psychologist to offer each individual child the personalized and caring treatment needed for his or her specific abusive history. Additionally, the book offers extremely valuable measurements to gauge the sucess of treatment and lead the way for further recovery. By adopting tried and true therapeutic approaches used on adults with PTSD; then modifying the approaches for children, Krill offers excellent advise for treatment on a continued basis, helping to ensure that children are given all the care they need for all the symptoms and results of the abuse. Ad additional resource offered by the book is the inclusion of "Quick Teach Sheets" which can be copied and shared with parents, social workers, and all caregivers who come into contact with the child. The book offers a complete and concise source of information to include the following: *Learn how to manage the often intense reactivity seen in stress episodes *Gain the practical, gentle, and effective treatment tools that really help these children *Use the Child Stress Profile (CSP) to guide treatment and measure therapeutic outcomes. Any adult who works with children in nearly any capacity can find much helpful reference material within these pages. I would feel confident recommending that all parents, teachers, foster parents, social workers, etc.; keep this book handy for continued reference.
    Anonymous More than 1 year ago