The Geocaching Handbook, 2nd: The Guide for Family Friendly, High-Tech Treasure Hunting

Overview

Ten years after it all began, geocaching is still going strong. Both the number of geocaches and the number of geocachers are in the millions, in more than 100 countries, and continue to grow. This fascinating, outdoor, technology-driven activity—which combines aspects of treasure hunting, cutting-edge navigation, and exploration—may be the fastest growing new sport on the planet. But there is much more to geocaching than what most people know.

This revised and updated ...

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The Geocaching Handbook, 2nd: The Guide for Family Friendly, High-Tech Treasure Hunting

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Overview

Ten years after it all began, geocaching is still going strong. Both the number of geocaches and the number of geocachers are in the millions, in more than 100 countries, and continue to grow. This fascinating, outdoor, technology-driven activity—which combines aspects of treasure hunting, cutting-edge navigation, and exploration—may be the fastest growing new sport on the planet. But there is much more to geocaching than what most people know.

This revised and updated handbook covers everything an aspiring geocacher needs to get started, and it provides plenty of information to help practicing geocachers take their skills to the next level. Learn how the game began—in a new foreword by its founding father, Dave Ulmer—and discover how to:

• Select a cache listing and begin your hunt for the treasure
• Buy a GPS receiver and use it to navigate to the cache
• Create and hide your own cache for others to find
• Practice backcountry safety and geocaching etiquette
• Play other geo-games, such as “Are U Nuts?” and “Geodashing”
• Connect with other geocachers through clubs, online communities, and geo-events

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780762763832
  • Publisher: Globe Pequot Press
  • Publication date: 3/1/2011
  • Edition description: Second
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 722,496
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Layne Cameron is an avid outdoorsman who has authored or coauthored five books and more than 300 articles for national magazines and newspapers, including Scouting magazine and Boys’ Life.

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Read an Excerpt

Brief History of Geocaching:

In 1996, President Bill Clinton penned Presidential Decision Directive NSTC-6, America's GPS policy. As a result of that directive, President Clinton ordered the Defense Department to turn off Selective Availability (the jamming signal) that prevented recreational users from receiving accurate positioning. On May 1, 2000, the White House announced that it would "stop the intentional degradation of the GPS signal available to the public beginning at midnight tonight. This will mean that civilian users of GPS will be able to pinpoint locations up to 10 times more accurately than they do now."

As history was being made, self-professed techno-geeks like Dave Ulmer, an electronics and software engineer from Portland, Oregon, followed the announcements. After brainstorming new ideas for this budding technology, Ulmer came up with the idea of a treasure hunt.

On May 3, just two days later, Ulmer placed a five-gallon bucket near a wooded road about one mile from his home. Inside the bucket were a logbook and some trinkets for trading. He dubbed his game The Great American GPS Stash Hunt.

Ulmer posted a message on the Usenet newsgroup sci.geo.satellite-nav announcing the inaugural stash and its GPS waypoint. He noted only one rule: "Get some stuff, leave some stuff."

Less than five days after setting out the inaugural cache, other caches were set out in states from California to Illinois and as far away as Australia. Today, there are more than 65,000 active caches in nearly 200 countries across the globe.

Tips:
Once you get within 25 feet of the cache, it's best to really turn up your sleuthing skills. You need to remember that the waypoint can be either the location of the cache or a vantage point from which to spot the cache. Look for places that could hide a five-gallon bucket, an ammo box, or a foot-long plastic tube, such as hollow stumps, clumps of cattails, in the nooks of boulders, or under a pile of pine needles.

If you are seeking out micro caches in cities, think to yourself, "Where would I hide a small tin?" Your search may have you peeking under park benches, loitering around alleys, or, in the case of "Chief Muncie," wading through hedges.

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Table of Contents

(1) Foreword by Dave Ulmer, the Founding Father of geocaching (2) Intoduction (3) Geocaching: The Global Sensation (4) Let's Go Geocaching (5) GPS Units (6) Creating Caches (7) Geo-Games (8) Backcountry Safety and Outdoor Etiquette (9) Geo-Happenings (10) Clubs and Web Sites (11) Cachionary 1.0 Glossary

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First Chapter

The Geocaching Handbook, 2nd

The Guide for Family Friendly, High-Tech Treasure Hunting
By Layne Cameron

Falcon

Copyright © 2011 Layne Cameron
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780762763832

Brief History of Geocaching:

In 1996, President Bill Clinton penned Presidential Decision Directive NSTC-6, America's GPS policy. As a result of that directive, President Clinton ordered the Defense Department to turn off Selective Availability (the jamming signal) that prevented recreational users from receiving accurate positioning. On May 1, 2000, the White House announced that it would "stop the intentional degradation of the GPS signal available to the public beginning at midnight tonight. This will mean that civilian users of GPS will be able to pinpoint locations up to 10 times more accurately than they do now."

As history was being made, self-professed techno-geeks like Dave Ulmer, an electronics and software engineer from Portland, Oregon, followed the announcements. After brainstorming new ideas for this budding technology, Ulmer came up with the idea of a treasure hunt.

On May 3, just two days later, Ulmer placed a five-gallon bucket near a wooded road about one mile from his home. Inside the bucket were a logbook and some trinkets for trading. He dubbed his game The Great American GPS Stash Hunt.

Ulmer posted a message on the Usenet newsgroup sci.geo.satellite-nav announcing the inaugural stash and its GPS waypoint. He noted only one rule: "Get some stuff, leave some stuff."

Less than five days after setting out the inaugural cache, other caches were set out in states from California to Illinois and as far away as Australia. Today, there are more than 65,000 active caches in nearly 200 countries across the globe.


Tips:
Once you get within 25 feet of the cache, it's best to really turn up your sleuthing skills. You need to remember that the waypoint can be either the location of the cache or a vantage point from which to spot the cache. Look for places that could hide a five-gallon bucket, an ammo box, or a foot-long plastic tube, such as hollow stumps, clumps of cattails, in the nooks of boulders, or under a pile of pine needles.

If you are seeking out micro caches in cities, think to yourself, "Where
would I hide a small tin?" Your search may have you peeking under park
benches, loitering around alleys, or, in the case of "Chief Muncie," wading through hedges.


Continues...

Excerpted from The Geocaching Handbook, 2nd by Layne Cameron Copyright © 2011 by Layne Cameron. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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