Geography of Desire

Geography of Desire

by Robert Boswell
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Reminiscent of Joan Didion's A Book of Common Prayer, The Geography of Desire is a mesmerizing tale of political intrigue, eroticism, repression, and murder in a mysterious Central American country.

Overview

Reminiscent of Joan Didion's A Book of Common Prayer, The Geography of Desire is a mesmerizing tale of political intrigue, eroticism, repression, and murder in a mysterious Central American country.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In his haunting first novel, Crooked Hearts , Boswell created an eccentric family locked in claustrophobic love and combat with each other. This time, he constructs a narrative in the style of Garcia Marquez, incorporating both magical realism and political timeliness, but he fails to create equals of the mesmerizing characters who animated his earlier work. Expatriate American Leon Green is the indolent proprietor of the dilapidated Hotel Esperanza in the village of La Boca in an unnamed Latin American country. La Boca may appear to be a tropical paradise, but its history, as related by storyteller and fabulist Ramon Matamoros, contains dark secrets. Leon, who fled California and two wives to discover a life that ``expresses his identity,'' is a charmless figure, self-absorbed and selfish. He is sleeping with two women: Pilar, an ex-university professor and political activist wanted by the police, and emotionally unbalanced teenager Lourdes, and he begins a third liaison when the opportunity occurs. Nevertheless, he sincerely believes that he wants to be ``a good man''; ironically, that is ``often the most dangerous kind of person,'' as events will show. Heavy with exposition and portentous with opaque refer ences, the novel is slow to get underway, and while Ramon's endless stories, which run counterpoint to the main plot line, have a certain charm, the narrative itself hangs fire almost until the end, by which time readers may not be interested in the characters' fates. Although Boswell does not misuse his talents here, he does not display them at their best. (Sept.)
Library Journal
This novel of sex and politics bears out the old adage, ``Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.'' Expatriate American Leon is seeking paradise in Central America. His life in the sleepy village of La Boca revolves around managing a decaying hotel and romancing two loves who differ greatly: the beautiful and cerebral Pilar, a revolutionary living in exile, and Lourdes, a passionate and wild-hearted teenager. While both vie for Leon's affections, with dire consequences, best friend Ramon weaves elaborate tales of La Boca's past and schemes to send his son to college. Hearts are broken, lies told, and lessons learned. Boswell has created a compelling and mystical tale of people living south of the border that enables readers to immerse themselves in another reality. Recommended.-- Kimberly G. Allen, National Assn. of Home Builders Lib., Washington, D.C.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060975876
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/01/1994
Edition description:
1st HarperPerennial ed
Pages:
320

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >