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George Washington and Benedict Arnold: A Tale of Two Patriots
     

George Washington and Benedict Arnold: A Tale of Two Patriots

4.6 7
by Dave Richard Palmer
 

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Fateful turns, choices and escapes from certain death dominate this captivating story of the most compelling figures of the Revolutionary War. When General George Washington appointed Benedict Arnold military commander of the Philadelphia region, military historian Palmer argues, he was not only making one of the worst personnel decisions of his career, but was

Overview


Fateful turns, choices and escapes from certain death dominate this captivating story of the most compelling figures of the Revolutionary War. When General George Washington appointed Benedict Arnold military commander of the Philadelphia region, military historian Palmer argues, he was not only making one of the worst personnel decisions of his career, but was also creating the conditions for the "Traitor of America" to commit his crime. Stark contrasts and similarities between two men show how their choices informed their destiny. The son of an alcoholic, Arnold became a wealthy merchant before he took up arms against the British, but distinguishing himself on the battlefield was not enough to earn Arnold the prestige he perpetually sought. Washington, who grew up on a tranquil farm, was the beneficiary of guidance from influential figures and was groomed to be a leader. Palmer has a talent for building momentum and suspense, but his most skilled turn is as profiler of the military comrades who would later be foes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596980204
Publisher:
Regnery Publishing
Publication date:
08/01/2006
Pages:
424
Sales rank:
1,253,151
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.50(d)

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George Washington and Benedict Arnold: A Tale of Two Patriots 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
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TulaneGirl More than 1 year ago
Overall a very interesting book which adds a multidimensional layer to the Benedict Arnold/George Washington story. Although the author interjects his voice uselessly and his writings of the battles is somewhat disjointed, the battle scenes themselves are engaging and interesting. The author really highlights Arnold's military genius. This book really documents Arnold's fall from grace - from honored rebel leader to traitor. He makes him seem almost sympathetic by making him human rather than a one-dimensional character without redemption. His downfall, really, isn't his loyalty or patriotism - but rather his jealousy and need for recognition. But for his ego and feelings being hurt, he may never have turned sides.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great, dual biography of George Washington and Benedict Arnold by a former Westpoint Superintendent. I found the book very engaging. We see Washington and Arnold's esential contributions to securing victory over the British in the American Revolution. Arnold is the ambitious, hot-tempered, daring battle field commander known as the Hannibal of the Patriots. Washington was of course the reserved but aggresive commanding general holding the cause together. Ultimately, you know what happens. Benedict Arnold betrays the country to the British and becomes the most reviled American in history. Palmer tells the story with sharp prose that flows well, almost like a novel. I was rivited to his account of the betrayal, which is the best part of the book. Lastly, the author concludes his work with an insightful and even insperational discussion of the examples of character that Washington and Arnold serve to demonstrate. The author demonstrates a unique sense of ethos on this subject as a militray leader himself and his role as a Superintendent of West Point, both the school founded to develop leaders of character and the infamous location of Arnold's treason. The book deserves (5) stars, and I think it is the best follow-up to McCullough's 1776.