Georgia, 1521-1776

Overview

Did you know that the treasure of the infamous pirate Blackbeard is probably buried on one of the islands off Georgia? And did you know of the dastardly deed of Spanish privateers that provoked the War of Jenkins's Ear?

James Oglethorpe's "noble experiment" to make Georgia a place where debtors got a second chance and slavery and alcohol were banned was destroyed by "malcontents." Plantations producing rice and indigo increased the demand for slave labor, and the rift between ...

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Overview

Did you know that the treasure of the infamous pirate Blackbeard is probably buried on one of the islands off Georgia? And did you know of the dastardly deed of Spanish privateers that provoked the War of Jenkins's Ear?

James Oglethorpe's "noble experiment" to make Georgia a place where debtors got a second chance and slavery and alcohol were banned was destroyed by "malcontents." Plantations producing rice and indigo increased the demand for slave labor, and the rift between the coastal planters and poorer upcountry farmers quickly divided the colony. This division would also complicate Georgia's decision to join the other colonies in the fight for independence.

National Geographic supports K-12 educators with ELA Common Core Resources.
Visit www.natgeoed.org/commoncore for more information.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
In the early days of European settlement, in what was to eventually become the state of Georgia, whites and Native Americans coexisted in a reasonably cooperative manner. The institution of slavery was illegal in the Georgia colony until the 18th century. Nevertheless, over time, the necessities of imperialism and economics led to the introduction of slavery and the expropriation of most native peoples. Colonial Georgia became similar to, if less prosperous, than its adjoining and connected colonial enclaves. Yet, despite the twists and turns of good fortune, the history of pre-revolutionary Georgia is one that encompasses a wealth of information and fascinating human-interest tales. In this illustrated work, readers are provided with an overview of the time period, which includes the initial settlement of Georgia, the emergence of social institutions that were to entrench themselves until Reconstruction, and the coming of the Revolutionary War in this southern state. This is a well-researched and capably written work and one that gives its readers a fitting introduction to the colonial history of the "Peach State." Readers should come away from this text with a clearer understanding of early Georgia history and the trends that set the stage for 19th century antebellum life and the coming of the Civil War. Part of the "Voices From Colonial America" series. 2006, National Geographic, and Ages 12 up.
—Greg M. Romaneck
VOYA - Angela Semifero
This eighteen-volume set discusses the history of each of the thirteen original colonies, from European exploration to the Declaration of Independence. Other volumes include Texas, California, Florida, Louisiana, and New France. New York: 1609-1776 primarily tells the story of New York as a center of trade. There is special emphasis placed on how its Dutch roots influenced development, on conflicts between English and Dutch armies, and on the colonists' interactions with the Iroquois tribes. Georgia: 1521-1776 describes the humble beginnings of a debtors' colony that evolved into a wealthy plantation state and became a significant battleground in the Revolutionary War. Stories of historical figures such as John Jay and Benedict Arnold are integrated into both texts as points of interest. These two texts, although more readable and pleasant than a textbook, do not present information in a way that meets any foreseeable audience interest. Scattered definitions and segments of primary documents do not add much to the narrative. The two texts contain time lines and great additional resources, including a very useful listing of Web sites. The books are not structured to serve as reference materials, nor is the narrative compelling enough to be read for entertainment. The authors do an exemplary job of summarizing the political and military aspects of the colonies, but other significant social issues are neglected. Attempts are made in the text to discuss slavery and interactions with Native Americans, but only the dominant political voices from colonial America are heard here. There are other resources that could be more useful for students learning about this period ofAmerican history, such as the Colonial America Reference Library.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780792263890
  • Publisher: National Geographic Society
  • Publication date: 4/11/2006
  • Series: Voices from Colonial America Series
  • Pages: 112
  • Product dimensions: 7.75 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Meet the Author

Robin Doak lives in Portland, CT.

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