Georgia: The Debtors Colony

Georgia: The Debtors Colony

by Susan Harkins, William H. Harkins
     
 

It was one of the most auspicious and ambitious colonial plans. Unfortunately, the well-meaning and charitable Trustees didn't really know what they were doing. They chose crops that wouldn't grow in the Georgia climate and soil. They prohibited slaves, and while that decision was progressive for those times, it put the settlers at an economic disadvantage. They… See more details below

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Overview

It was one of the most auspicious and ambitious colonial plans. Unfortunately, the well-meaning and charitable Trustees didn't really know what they were doing. They chose crops that wouldn't grow in the Georgia climate and soil. They prohibited slaves, and while that decision was progressive for those times, it put the settlers at an economic disadvantage. They simply couldn't compete with the other colonies for new settlers and continued financing. Georgia wasn't a failure, but its settlers worked harder than any others to survive.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-These titles look at the disparate beginnings of three Colonial settlements. The design is utilitarian, but the full-color historical reproductions add visual appeal. The authors of Georgia and Pennsylvania humanize facts by focusing on individuals who were pivotal to the development of their colonies-James Oglethorpe, who hoped for a way to improve the fortunes of London's poor, and William Penn, who wanted to base a government on his religious ideals. The impact of other European powers is also explored as Pennsylvania faced French attempts to gain land while Georgia was fighting off Spanish incursions. "FYI" pages present more details on important topics. The impact on the Native people is addressed but primarily in terms of how they interacted with the Europeans. Plymouth separates fact from misconception with regard to the use of the word Pilgrim, Puritan/Pilgrim dress, the first Thanksgiving, and King Philip's War. Oddly, however, the whole first chapter is about "The Lost Colony," a failed earlier attempt by the British to establish a foothold in the New World. There is no direct relationship between the two colonies. If Tracy is establishing historical context, it is strange that Jamestown, closer geographically and chronologically, is described in only one line before she moves on to events in England that led up to the formation of the Plymouth colony. A map caption erroneously states that the Plymouth colony was established before the Virginia colony. For basic coverage of the topics, Pennsylvania and Georgia are worthwhile offerings. Plymouth does not make a significant new contribution.-Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584154655
Publisher:
Mitchell Lane Pub Inc
Publication date:
10/28/2006
Series:
Building America Ser.
Edition description:
Library Edition
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
6.70(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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