Georgia's Civilian Conservation Corps, Georgia (Images of America Series)

Georgia's Civilian Conservation Corps, Georgia (Images of America Series)

by Connie M. Huddleston
     
 

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At a time when our country struggled with a deep financial depression, the United States began to see incredible numbers of men and women who could not find work. During the first days of his administration, Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt sought to create opportunities for this country's uneducated and undereducated young men to find work, help support their families…  See more details below

Overview


At a time when our country struggled with a deep financial depression, the United States began to see incredible numbers of men and women who could not find work. During the first days of his administration, Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt sought to create opportunities for this country's uneducated and undereducated young men to find work, help support their families, and receive training in a variety of fields. President Roosevelt's own vision brought about the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Images of America: Georgia's Civilian Conservation Corps examines the role these young men played in developing three national forests, three national monuments, a national battlefield, 10 state parks, and four military installations. This book illustrates and gives voice to the CCC's rich contribution to Georgia's landscape and history and allows us to understand how the creation of this social employment program was once seen as the shining example of FDR's New Deal.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Title: Roosevelt's Tree Army

Author: Jonathan Copsey

Publisher: The Beacon

Date: 5/9/09

Connie Huddleston, past president of the RHS and current chair of the Hembree Farm committee, presented her research and book detailing Georgia's Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC).

Roosevelt was inaugurated in March of 1933 and by the end of the month had passed the legislation calling for the creation of the CCC, to be enacted that summer. At the time of its passage, almost one in four young men were unemployed; the CCC was to make 500,000 jobs for the young men creating and restoring the nation's parks.

Paid $30 a month, the men kept $5 and sent the rest of it to their families all over the country. The men lived in camps and were trained and commanded by the army. They were taught useful skills such as operating machinery and construction from locals who lived near the camps. Meanwhile, they were put to work felling trees and making paths through forests, erecting dams and bridges. In Georgia alone, 10 state parks and three national parks were created, so were the battlefield parks of Kennesaw and Chickamauga-Chattanooga. Many of these parks are still in use today.

Among the many interesting little details of the book, according to Huddleston, is a photographer named Anderson. This man, of which little is known, was a semi-official photographer of the work the CCC did, traveling the country taking pictures of bridges and fire watch-towers. etc. But, in nearly all of his pictures, there is an unknown woman, fashionably dressed and acting like a tourist.

The Roswell Historical Society is continuing a year-long series of fundraising events with Dinner at Barrington Hall on June 6. For more information call the society office at 770-992-1665.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738568379
Publisher:
Arcadia Publishing SC
Publication date:
04/13/2009
Series:
Images of America Series
Pages:
127
Sales rank:
1,366,709
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author


Interpretive historian Connie M. Huddleston first became interested in the CCC as she developed exhibits for Georgia State Parks using photographic collections of the National Archives, former members of the CCC, and her personal collection. Huddleston is a historic preservation consultant and owner of Interpreting Time's Past, LL C. She lives in Marietta, Georgia.

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