Georgis' Parasitology for Veterinarians

Georgis' Parasitology for Veterinarians

2.0 1
by Dwight D. Bowman
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Now in full color, this comprehensive reference provides current information on all parasites commonly encountered in veterinary medicine. Its primary focus is on parasites that infect major domestic species, such as dogs, cats, horses. pigs, and ruminants. This edition also covers organisms that infect poultry, laboratory animals, and exotic species. And with this

Overview

Now in full color, this comprehensive reference provides current information on all parasites commonly encountered in veterinary medicine. Its primary focus is on parasites that infect major domestic species, such as dogs, cats, horses. pigs, and ruminants. This edition also covers organisms that infect poultry, laboratory animals, and exotic species. And with this book’s coverage of minor and rare parasites, you’ll be able to diagnose more difficult cases. No other book in this market is so respected and so complete. It’s the only parasitology reference that provides everything you’ll need!

  • Thorough coverage describes parasites that infect most major domestic species, and also includes organisms that infect poultry, lab animals and exotic species.
  • A convenient appendix includes six drug tables listing parasiticides by species and a table of commercial antiparasitic vaccines, for easy access to the most up-to-date drug information.
  • Greek and Latin roots of terms are arranged alphabetically on the inside front and back covers, providing a quick reference when you’re in a hurry.
  • Over 800 full-color photos and line drawings help you identify parasites accurately.
  • A new introductory chapter provides an overview of parsitology.
  • A new Vector-borne Diseases chapter restates viruses, rickettsiae and other bacteria, protozoa, and helminths in terms of vectors.

Editorial Reviews

3 Stars from Doody
Joseph A. DiPietro(University of Illinois College Medicine)
This book contains fundamentals of veterinary parasitology that both veterinary students and practitioners will find useful. The sixth edition under the new authorship of D. D. Bowman remains largely unchanged from the fifth edition published in 1990, with the notable exception of the sections on antiparasitic medications and diagnostic parasitology. The purpose remains to introduce those aspects of veterinary parasitology that veterinarians will find useful and to serve as a suitable reference for practitioners and students. The authors met these objectives largely. However, future editions of the book may be improved by the inclusion of a section organized by host species devoted solely to parasite epidemiology and control programs in contrast to the intermingling this information within the text as presently done. This book is intended for veterinary students studying parasitology and as a reference for veterinary practitioners. Illustrations and drawings are extensive, of excellent quality, and add to the overall attractive appearance of this text. The figures, particularly the parasite life cycles, are valuable as teaching aids for both the student and veterinary client. The book includes numerous keys, pictures, photomicrographs, and drawings of various stages of helminth, arthropod, and protozoal parasites, making this a handy reference manual for parasite diagnosis. References in this edition have been updated substantively and the section on antiparasitic drugs, which has been completely revised and newly formatted based on drug activity, is an improvement over prerious editions. Likewise, the sections on antemortem and postmortem diagnostic methods have been improved byorganizing them based on host. This is a useful book for students of veterinary parasitology and should serve them well as a basic reference upon graduation. For those who already have previous editions of this text, the revised and reformatted fourth chapter on antiparasitic drugs alone justifies the purchase of the new edition of this long-time veterinary text.
Douglas E. Hutchens
This seventh edition of the revered and noteworthy text used extensively by both veterinary students and veterinarians is divided into five chapters: Arthropods, Protozoans, Heminths, Antiparasitic Drugs, and Diagnostic Parasitology. The format is very similar to previous editions, while the text has been updated to reflect current information and discoveries in parasitology. The text also includes a large number of helpful illustrations and an extensive index. The purpose is to provide veterinary students and veterinarians with a useful resource guide in parasitology. The intended audience is veterinary students and veterinarians. This text features chapters covering arthropods, protozoans, and helminths of veterinary medicine including the taxonomy, life cycles, clinical signs, diagnosis, and treatment of each parasite's infection or infestation. Other features are chapters encompassing diagnostic parasitology and antiparasitic drugs. Helpful illustrations are also included throughout the text to aid in the identification and life history of parasites of veterinary significance. Also, minor or rare parasites are included in the text as a resource to veterinarians in the diagnosis of difficult cases. Overall, this is a very useful guide and resource concerning veterinary parasitology. The ample illustrations of life cycles and individual parasites are very helpful to veterinary students in understanding the importance of parasite life cycles and appropriate veterinary intervention to break the life cycle and prevent further transmission. Conversely, a few errors were discovered concerning anthelmintic dosages in the chapter covering antiparasitic drugs. Also, the sectionconcerning the application of parasite egg count data, chiefly strongyles, stated that egg counting techniques have their greatest utility in estimating levels of strongyle infections. This statement seems to depart from current dogma which has been that egg counts do not correlate with level of parasite infection. It does not take into account prepatent infections, number of hypobiotic larvae, and differences of egg shedding between individual species of strongyles. Despite these shortcomings, this text has been and will continue to be the benchmark of veterinary parasitology texts.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Allan John Paul, DVM, MS (University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine)
Description: This is an update of a 2009 edition of a book on veterinary parasitology.
Purpose: The objective is to provide updated information including new images, tables, etc., so that the book will continue to serve veterinarians and students of veterinary parasitology well.
Audience: Veterinary practitioners and students are the intended audience.
Features: The book covers many aspects of veterinary parasites, including their biology, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and control. The new images, information, and chapters are fantastic. This edition is very user friendly.
Assessment: This is an outstanding book on veterinary parasitology for both practitioners and students. This updated edition provides much new and useful information. A must buy!
From the Publisher
"This is an outstanding book on veterinary parasitology for both practitioners and students. This updated edition provides much new and useful information. A must buy!"-Allan Paul, DVM, MS(University of Illinois College of Veterimary Medicine) Doody Review: 5 stars

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416069188
Publisher:
Elsevier Health Sciences
Publication date:
10/16/2008
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
464
File size:
56 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Georgis' Parasitology for Veterinarians 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm in vet school and this book is not nearly as detailed as I would like. I don't really like the way it is written either, the author tries to be funny and add humor, which is ok but sometimes just plain annoying. Ehhhh... I would pick a better book for parasitology....