German Essays On Music

Overview

Up to the end of the nineteenth century, Germany largely perceived itself as "the nation of poets and philosophers." But with the enormous popularity of Schubert and Wagner, this began to change. Suddenly, composers also began to play a greater role in theories of national identity, and music theory became and important element of German thought. The essays in this volume reflect this, and are by a range of writers: Adorno, Bloch, Thomas Mann, Wachenroder, Herder, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Hegel, Bettina von Arnim, ...

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Overview

Up to the end of the nineteenth century, Germany largely perceived itself as "the nation of poets and philosophers." But with the enormous popularity of Schubert and Wagner, this began to change. Suddenly, composers also began to play a greater role in theories of national identity, and music theory became and important element of German thought. The essays in this volume reflect this, and are by a range of writers: Adorno, Bloch, Thomas Mann, Wachenroder, Herder, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Hegel, Bettina von Arnim, Nietzsche, Max Weber, Brecht, and others.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A collection of 33 essays reflecting the role of music in German theories of national identity and the importance of music theory in German thought. Includes essays by Thomas Mann, Immanuel Kant, Max Weber, and Bertolt Brecht. Includes notes on the authors. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826407214
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 12/1/1994
  • Series: German Library Series , #43
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: Jost Hermand

CHRISTIAN GOTTLIEB LUDWIG

From An Attempt to Prove That a Musical Play or Opera Cannot Be Good (1734)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

KARL WILHELM RAMLER

In Defense of the Operas (1756)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

CHRISTIAN FRIEDRICH DANIEL SCHUBART

Concerning Musical Genius (1784)

Translated by Richard W. Harpster

Concerning Musical Expression (1784)

Translated by Ted Alan DuBois

IMMANUEL KANT

The Division of the Fine Arts (1790)

Translated by James Creed Meredith

JOHANN GEORG SULZER

Expression in Music (1792-1794)

Music (1794)

Translated by Peter Le Huray and James Day

WILHELM HEINRICH WACKENRODER

The Marvels of the Musical Art (1799)

Translated by Mary Hurst Schubert

JOHANN GOTTFRIED HERDER

Music, an Art of Humanity (1802)

Translated by Edward A. Lippman

JOHANN NICKOLAUS FORKEL

Bach the Composer (1802)

The Genius of Bach (1802)

Translated by Charles Sanford Terry

E.T.A. (Ernst Theodor Amadeus) HOFFMANN

Beethoven's Instrumental Music (1813)

Translated by Oliver Strunk

ARTHUR SCHOPENHAUER

From The World as Will and Representation (1819)

Translated by Peter Le Huray and James Day

GEORG FRIEDRICH WILHELM HEGEL

From The Aesthetics (1835)

Translated by Peter Le Huray and James Day

BETTINA VON ARNIM

Beethoven (1832)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

EDUARD HANSLICK

"Content" and "Form" in Music (1854)

Translated by Geoffrey Payzant

FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

From Richard Wagner in Bayreuth (1876)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

The Case of Wagner (1888)

Translated by Walter Kaufmann

FRIEDRICH VON HAUSEGGER

A Popular Discussion of Music as Expression (c. 1885)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

THOMAS MANN

Coming to Terms with Richard Wagner (1913)

Translated by Allan Blunden

Hans Pfitzner's Palestrina (1918)

Translated by Walter D. Morris

AUGUST HALM

On Fugal Form, Its Nature, and Its Relation to Sonata Form (1913)

Translated by Edward A. Lippman

HANS BREUER

The Wandervogel Movement and Folk Song (1919)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

MAX WEBER

Technical, Economic, and Social Interrelations between Modern Music and Its Instruments (1921)

Translated by Don Martindale, Johannes Riedel, and Gertrude Neuwirth

H.H. STUCKENSCHMIDT

The Mechanization of Music (1925)

The Ivory Tower (1955)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

WILHELM FURTWÄNGLER

Problems of Conducting (1929)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

PETER SUHRKAMP

Music in the Schools (1930)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

ARNOLD SCHERING

Music and Society (1931)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

HEINRICH SCHENKER

Introduction to the First Edition of Free Composition (1935)

Translated by Ernst Oster

BERTOLT BRECHT

On the Use of Music in an Epic Theater (1935)

Translated by John Willett

ERNST BLOCH

Human Expression as Inseparable from Music (1955)

Translated by Peter Palmer

BRUNO WALTER

Thoughts on the Essential Nature of Music (1957)

Translated by Paul Hamburger

THEODOR W. ADORNO

Classes and Strata (1962)

Translated by E.B. Ashton

GEORG KNEPLER

Music Historiography in Eastern Europe (1972)

Translated by Barry S. Brooks et al.

DIETRICH FISCHER-DIESKAU

The Composer (c. 1978)

Translated by Kenneth S. Whitton

CARL DAHLHAUS

Absolute Music as an Aesthetic Paradigm (1978)

Translated by Roger Lustig

GÜNTER MAYER

From On the Relationship of the Political and Musical Avant-garde (1989)

Translated by Michael Gilbert

JOST HERMAND

Avant-garde, Modern, Postmodern: The Music (Almost) Nobody Wants to Hear (1991)

Translated by James Keller

The Authors

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