Germs, Genes, and Bacteria: How They Influence Modern Life (Collection)

Germs, Genes, and Bacteria: How They Influence Modern Life (Collection)

by David Clark, Greg Gibson, Anne Maczulak, Paul J. H. Schoemaker
     
 

Five-time Emmy-nominated screenwriter (Late Night with David Letterman, etc.) debuts with a lackluster Sex and the City clone. Ruby Capote is a Boston columnist whose beat is the woe of single women. She oughta know: Her silly boyfriend Doug collects the little plastic thingies from bread bags and calls his purple Porsche "The Grape." Hoping to move on, Ruby sends…  See more details below

Overview

Five-time Emmy-nominated screenwriter (Late Night with David Letterman, etc.) debuts with a lackluster Sex and the City clone. Ruby Capote is a Boston columnist whose beat is the woe of single women. She oughta know: Her silly boyfriend Doug collects the little plastic thingies from bread bags and calls his purple Porsche "The Grape." Hoping to move on, Ruby sends tear sheets and a six-pack to the editor of the New York News, handsome Michael Hobbs, who eventually assigns her to the men-are-scum beat. He oughta know: he's quasi-engaged to a beauty, but obviously eager to hook up with Ruby, whose new circle of friends offers plenty of material. Amoral and gorgeous model Skorka prefers married men-they don't get attached and never leave their socks lying around. Jenn is an overworked factotum for a manically demanding media personality. Lily's never had much luck with men-is she a lesbian? Divorced Danielle just dumped her 23-year-old swain after discovering he's the son of a previous lover. And so on, through mildly comedic matters that include a vagina visualization workshop a la Eve Ensler-but Ruby has other things on her mind and can't imagine what her vagina would say or wear (if it could). Doug's been offered a job in New York, but that relationship is totally over, even though the clueless chump doesn't think so. A hallway flirtation and subsequent fling with a sexy neighbor, TV exec Tom, goes nowhere, which leaves only Michael, but he's her boss. Obligatory forays are taken into Ruby's past: the car crash that killed her alcoholic father; the adolescent crush she had on her shrink. These alone may not explain why her relationships with men are difficult, but when she finds outMichael's dark secret, she's ready to believe that men really are scum. The girlfriends concur, though Ruby makes up her own mind in the end. Some laughs, but very much the same old.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780132788342
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
03/30/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
696
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Eat, Drink, Gossip...Who said Poker Night was just for the Guys?

Dissatisfied both with writing a “Single Girl on the Edge/Ledge/Verge” column and with her boyfriend, Ruby Capote sends her best columns and a six-pack of beer to the editor of The New York News and lands herself a job in the big city. There, Ruby undertakes the venerable tradition of Poker Night—a way (as men have always known) to eat, drink, smoke, analyze, interrupt one another, share stories, and, most of all, raise the stakes.

When Ruby falls for her boss, though, all bets are off. What happens when Mr. Right has his own unresolved past? As smart as it is laugh-out-loud funny, Girls' Poker Night is a refreshingly upbeat look at friendship, work, and love.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

1. The first line of the book is "Happy endings aren't for cowards." What does this mean to Ruby? How does it relate to the other characters in the book?

2. Ruby's father's name is Adam (p. 55) what is the significance of the 'first man' in Ruby's life? How does this relationship influence future relationships?

3. Does the way in which Ruby's relationship with Dr. Steve is cut short reinforce her relationship with her father?

4. Ruby's friends are very much an extended family. Like families, they share similarities. Besides a love of poker, and gossip, what traits do they share? (explore humor here, or fear of commitment, a sense of being 'stuck')

5. Why did the author choose to have John, Ruby's brother, be ten years older than Ruby? What might the author have been trying to accomplish? How does this relate to the loss of Ruby's father?

6. What reasons might Ruby have had for becoming a writer? The letters she received from Michael, the columns she writes ... how do these reinforce the themes of loss and searching?

7. What role does therapy play in Ruby's life? What role does writing play? Are there similarities between the two?

8. Toward the end of the book, Ruby witnesses a woman's death, and then writes her obituary. This is an important moment for Ruby. Why?

9. When Ruby visits Psychic Randy, and recalls that she did not attend her father's funeral -- why would the author choose to have this revealed in the midst of the psyhic instead of the therapist?

10. Much like Dorothy in "The Wizard of Oz" Ruby realizes the 'answers' are within, instead of being in the external world. Is this a relief?

11. Like Ruby, the Cadaver is a flawed character. Unlike Ruby, her name is never revealed. Why might the author choose not to reveal the Cadaver's name?

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >