Gerry Mulligan Meets Ben Webster

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Cub Koda
Make no mistake about it, the swing and bop start right here on this legendary 1959 session between baritone saxophonist Gerry Mulligan and tenor man Ben Webster. Produced by Norman Granz as an early Verve album, this Mobile Fidelity 24-karat gold-disc reissue is sonically worth the extra bread as it feels like you're right in the control room every note of the way. The opening track, Billy Strayhorn's "Chelsea Bridge" is lush and emotional and truly sets the tone for this album. With Jimmy Rowles on piano his intro on "Sunday" sounds like a ragtimer like Willie "The Lion" Smith just pushed him off the stool before the band came in, Mel Lewis on drums, and the always superb ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Cub Koda
Make no mistake about it, the swing and bop start right here on this legendary 1959 session between baritone saxophonist Gerry Mulligan and tenor man Ben Webster. Produced by Norman Granz as an early Verve album, this Mobile Fidelity 24-karat gold-disc reissue is sonically worth the extra bread as it feels like you're right in the control room every note of the way. The opening track, Billy Strayhorn's "Chelsea Bridge" is lush and emotional and truly sets the tone for this album. With Jimmy Rowles on piano his intro on "Sunday" sounds like a ragtimer like Willie "The Lion" Smith just pushed him off the stool before the band came in, Mel Lewis on drums, and the always superb Leroy Vinnegar on bass present and accounted for, the rhythm section is superbly swinging with just the right amount of bop lines and chords in the mix to spice things up. The ghost of Duke Ellington hovers over every note on this record Billy Strayhorn was one of his main arrangers and that is a very good thing, indeed. There's a beautiful, understated quality to the music on this session that makes it the perfect relaxing around the house on a rainy day disc to pop in the player. File this one under cool, very smooth, and supple.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/21/1990
  • Label: Polygram Records
  • UPC: 042284166126
  • Catalog Number: 841661
  • Sales rank: 35,842

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Chelsea Bridge (7:22)
  2. 2 The Cat Walk (5:47)
  3. 3 Sunday (7:25)
  4. 4 Who's Got Rhythm (7:42)
  5. 5 Tell Me When (5:06)
  6. 6 Go Home (10:04)
  7. 7 In a Mellotone (6:57)
  8. 8 What Is This Thing Called Love? (7:28)
  9. 9 For Bessie (5:41)
  10. 10 Fajista (5:50)
  11. 11 Blues in B Flat (7:22)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Gerry Mulligan Primary Artist, Baritone Saxophone
Mel Lewis Drums
Jimmy Rowles Piano
Ben Webster Tenor Saxophone
Leroy Vinnegar Bass
Technical Credits
Gerry Mulligan Composer
Ben Webster Composer
Ned Miller Composer
Norman Granz Producer
Benny Krueger Composer
Cole Porter Composer
Phil Schaap Producer, Engineer
Jule Styne Composer
Chester Conn Composer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 4, 2011

    1930's Tenor Star + 1950's Baritone Icon

    All the cuts here are satisfying, a couple are quite infectious. But I enjoy Gerry Mulligan's work more when he was not having to play second fiddle or host to another jazz star. The "Konitz Meets Mulligan" album had the same limitations, for me. One pairing that is totally enjoyable in this vein however is the Mulligan & Paul Desmond sessions.
    Ben Webster was good on this album, but far from his best. I urge you to not make this your only exposure to these great sax men.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews