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Overview

This comprehensive guide to healthy living offers a wide range of alternative approaches to help you stay healthy. These may be approaches your conventionally trained doctor wasn't taught in medical school. Some are supported by thousands of years of use in other societies, some have been discovered or refined in recent years. When used correctly, they may improve your health—or even save your life—as the better alternative to drugs, surgical intervention and other standard Western techniques.
Get Healthy Now! with Gary Null is your ABC of basic and enhanced nutrition, detoxification, prevention, treatment, exercise, beauty, and longevity, with special sections on women's health issues, and health areas of special concern to men. Get Healthy Now! also features more than 200 pages of alphabetical, state-by-state listings of alternative health practitioners nationwide.

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What People Are Saying

Martin Feldman, M.D.
I finally have a book to recommend to my patients! Get Healthy Now! redefines the medicine model by presenting the road to optimal health.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781888363975
  • Publisher: Seven Stories Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/1999
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 860
  • Sales rank: 1,288,298
  • Product dimensions: 6.52 (w) x 9.56 (h) x 2.41 (d)

Meet the Author

Gary Null

Nutritionist and natural-living advocate GARY NULL is one of America's leading health and fitness writers. The author of dozens of books and hundreds of medical articles, Null’s film documentaries on the politics of health have won awards around the world, and his daily and weekly radio broadcasts educate millions on nutrition-based approaches to wellness and disease prevention. 

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Read an Excerpt




Chapter One


"You Are What You Eat"


Forty years ago, roughly a third of the grocery store was devoted to natural, fresh produce. Today, it is a small fraction of that, and even what appears to be natural has been altered. Fruits and vegetables are routinely grown with artificial fertilizers, sprayed with pesticides, treated with hormones and chemicals to control the time of ripening to facilitate mechanical harvesting, dyed, sprayed with chemicals to prevent them from ripening during shipping or to induce ripening after shipping, and coated with waxes to give a glossy appearance.

    Modern bread fares no better. The Western world is built on wheat, which, for thousands of years, has been prepared as bread and known as the staff of life. Wheat (and other whole grains) provides a rich source of nutrients: complex carbohydrates, protein, oils, roughage, and an excellent balance of dozens of vitamins and minerals. Grinding wheat with stone rollers blends these ingredients together, yielding a product so nutritionally rich that it is prone to spoilage and attacks by vermin and fungi if not immediately used. In order to make a product that could be transported over long distances and stored indefinitely, bread less prone to spoiling was necessary. White flour was born.

    White flour begins with steel rather than stone rollers, thereby flattening and separating the bran and germ, which carry most of wheat's nutrients and are sold as animal feeds, from a chalklike dust. Chlorine gases are used to bleach out any remaining substance. The product is then"enriched" with synthetic versions of some of the vitamins removed earlier in the processing. The vitamins considered necessary for this "enrichment" are, not coincidentally, those which are most easily synthesized. These are the ingredients commonly listed on loaves of bread made from enriched flour: barley malt, ferrous sulfate, niacin, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, corn syrup, partially hydrogenated vegetable shortening, yeast, salt, dicalcium phosphate, calcium propionate, and potassium bromate.

    Some of the flour additives and processing chemicals that need not, according to the Code of Federal Regulations, be listed on the package include: oxides of nitrogen, chlorine, nitrosyl chloride, chlorine dioxide, benzoyl peroxide, acetone peroxide, azodicarbonamide, and plaster of Paris.


Sugar


One of the most common additives in processed foods is sugar. The average American eats 160 pounds of sugar a year. After processing, many foods are so lacking in taste that there would be no flavor at all without adding large quantities of sugar or salt.

    Sugar is ideal for the processed-food industry because many people like its taste and it is cheap, but primarily because it is addictive. Sugar in large quantifies is concealed in many foods; not only in candy, cake, and soft drinks, but in bread, breakfast cereals, cheeses, condiments, and canned or packaged foods. Most processed foods have large amounts of sugar, and those that do not have large amounts of salt. It is not easy to eliminate sugar from your diet.


Water


Americans have grown accustomed to the excellence of their water supplies. Since the turn of the century, treatment of municipal water with chlorine disinfectants has provided protection against disease-causing microorganisms, and private wells are usually tested periodically to assure quality standards. Massive programs to build sewage treatment plants are in effect throughout the country, and standard operation procedures maintain the strict control of disease-causing microorganisms, since much of the water we drink is someone else's sewage.

    However, even as the problem of human wastes is being controlled, a larger problem is looming: the industrial pollution of drinking-water supplies. Hundreds of thousands of industrial plants discharge grit, asbestos, phosphates, nitrates, mercury, lead, caustic soda, sulfur, sulfuric acid, oils, and petrochemicals into many of the waterways from which we eventually drink. Treatment plants designed to handle human wastes are unable to remove many of these more toxic, chemically complex, and sometimes unstable substances. Ironically, one of the carcinogens identified as occurring in water results when chlorine mixes with organic matter.

    Nationwide, over 700 chemical pollutants have been identified in public water supplies. Most of these are carcinogenic, cause birth defects, or are otherwise toxic. Over 20 scientific studies have documented a consistent link between consumption of trace organic chemical contaminants in drinking water and elevated cancer mortality rates. In spite of mounting evidence, existing United States public health standards reflect virtually no acknowledgment of toxic and carcinogenic substances in drinking water. As a result, no concerted effort has been made to remove them from public water supplies. Parallel failures to protect drinking water quality and to regulate massive discharges of nonbiodegradable industrial wastes forecast a grim future for the American public. Toxic contamination has already forced many communities to find alternative sources of water. Still, the overwhelming majority of the nation's drinking water systems have never been tested for the presence of toxic pollutants. The response to this dual environmental and health dilemma has been woefully inadequate.


Meat and Poultry


Most of us picture farms as being like those we remember from childhood, or like those we have seen in pictures or on television. We imagine farm animals in their pens, or even roaming around a farmyard. Such farms may exist, but they are not the source of the meat we buy and eat today. Chickens are raised by the tens of thousands in giant buildings where they never see the light of day. They are kept in cages where they cannot move, with conveyor belts bringing them food and water and carrying away their waste. When they do move about, they often slide around on their breasts, as some modern breeds grow too fast for their legs to support them. They are constantly sprayed and their food doused with chemicals, hormones, and medicines. Attempts also are being made to breed featherless chickens.

    Many pigs are also raised in cages, without ever seeing daylight. Such conditions are particularly cruel for pigs, which are close to dogs in intelligence and sensitivity. Steers similarly spend most of their lives out of doors, but are no less exposed to chemicals in their upbringing.

    Today, a steer is born, taken from its mother and put on a diet of powdered milk, synthetic vitamins, minerals, and antibiotics. Drugs in its food reduce its activities to save on feed. Next, it is permitted to eat some pasture grass, but this is supplemented with processed feed premixed with antibiotics and growth-promoting drugs. At six months, it weighs 500 pounds and is ready for the feed lot. Here it is doused with pesticides and then placed in a pen that is lit around the clock to change natural sleep rhythms and encourage continuous feeding. Food consists of grains, urea, carbohydrates, ground-up newspaper, molasses, plastic pellets, and, most recently, reprocessed manure, a high protein source. After four months in the feed lot, a steer weighs 1,200 pounds. A few more doses of pesticides, antibiotics, and hormones are administered to pretenderize it while it is still alive, and it is ready for slaughter.

    Nearly all poultry, pigs, and veal calves, and 60 percent of cattle, get antibiotics added to their feed. Seventy-five percent of pigs eat feed laced with sulfa drugs. Cattle feeders use a variety of hormones and other additives to promote rapid weight gain in their animals.

    While farmers rely more and more on chemicals to shore up animal health under factory conditions, dangerous residues are showing up in meat and poultry products. Fourteen percent of meat and poultry sampled by the Agriculture Department in the mid and late 1970s contained illegally high levels of drugs and pesticides. According to a recent General Accounting Office report, "of the 143 drugs and pesticides G.A.O. identified as likely to leave residues in raw meat and poultry, 42 are known to cause or are suspected of causing cancer, 20 of causing birth defects, and six of causing mutations."


Chemical Additives


The average American ate 2 pounds of chemical additives in food in 1960 and 10 pounds in 1978, a fivefold increase in less than 20 years. At the end of 1998, the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Everything Added to Food in the United States (EAFUS) Database contained information on more than 3,000 substances that were being added directly to what we eat. The actual number of additives was even higher: Despite its lofty fide, the FDA acknowledged that the database did not include "indirect" additives, and may actually have been only a partial compilation of substances that were "lawfully" added to our food supplies. Most of these additives were not put in foods to preserve shelf life or retard spoilage, as is usually claimed; instead, more than 90 percent of the additives (both by weight and by value) were there to deceive—that is, to make the agribusiness product look, taste, feel, and nourish more like the real thing.

    No one questions the fact that there are a lot of chemicals in our food. Manufacturers contend, however, that these chemicals are safe, that they have been tested and approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Are all these chemicals really safe? The answer is no.

    If food additives can be dangerous, why are we told otherwise? The answer lies in the complex interrelations of the food industry, media, government, and medical research. The food industry is very big business, with annual sales well over $200 billion. Each year, well over $500 million worth of chemicals are added to foods. The food industry is a major advertiser in consumer magazines and on television, so magazines and television too often are careful of being critical. Food industries are major sources of grants for university research departments. Government agencies have close relationships with the industries they are supposed to regulate. Many research scientists and government management personnel eventually enter the industry they previously regulated—and at much higher paying jobs.

    There are literally thousands of chemicals added to food. Few of these have been adequately tested, and none have been tested in combination with others. Many that have been tested, have been known to be dangerous for 30 years or more. DES, a synthetic hormone used to fatten cattle, has been known for decades to cause cancer. Industry fights attempts to ban such chemicals every step of the way. When, as in the case of DES, a ban is finally achieved, some producers continue to use it anyway. And by the time the ban is obtained, there are a dozen similar chemicals to replace the one banned, some of which may be worse.

    Agribusiness encourages a way of eating that disrupts our physical health and erodes the sense of fulfillment that comes from preparing and eating real food. A fast-food rationale enters the community and the home, with deleterious effects. Agribusiness also undermines all local farmers, who lend economic and ecological stability to the country. And industrialized foods simply do not taste as good as food should. They are dependent upon salt, sugar, chemicals, and billions of dollars in advertising. The fact is, most of us simply have forgotten what real food tastes like.


Basic Nutrition


Basic nutrition begins with six major nutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. Along with an understanding of these basic nutrients, for good health you also need to be aware of the air you breathe, the balance of enzymes in your body, and the function of antioxidants in helping your body to combat disease and degenerative processes. Your body needs all of these nutrients every day. How much you need of each depends on your health as well as your energy needs.

    Energy may be why we need food, but it isn't necessarily why we eat sometimes a great deal, sometimes too little, or, all too often, the wrong things in the wrong amounts. When it comes to nourishing our bodies, many of us follow the dictates of myths, fads, or bizarre and exotic diets. We all know the proper kind of gas for a car and the best kind of food for our cat or dog. We may know our carburetors and our Siamese, but we don't know ourselves.

    Information about good nutrition abounds. Yet many people don't bother to find out more about it. Some simply don't know where to look or what to trust. The following chapters should help point the way and begin that journey. After reading this section of the book, you will know all about real food and how to make the most of it in living a more healthful life.

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Table of Contents

Part One: Back to the Basics: What is Nutrition?
CHAPTER 1 "YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT" 23
CHAPTER 2 CARBOHYDRATES 28
CHAPTER 3 FATS 38
CHAPTER 4 PROTEIN 45
CHAPTER 5 VITAMINS 54
CHAPTER 6 MINERALS 63
CHAPTER 7 WATER, AIR, ENZYMES, AND ANTIOXIDANTS 70
CHAPTER 8 DIET AND DIGESTION 75
Part Two: Taking Charge of Your Health
CHAPTER 9 DETOXIFICATION 83
CHAPTER 10 WEIGHT MANAGEMENT 92
CHAPTER 11 A BEGINNER'S WEIGHT MANAGEMENT DIET 99
CHAPTER 12 VEGETARIANISM 111
CHAPTER 13 A VEGETARIAN ROTATION DIET AND RECIPES 142
CHAPTER 14 EXERCISE 163
CHAPTER 15 BRINGING HERBS INTO YOUR DAILY LIFE 180
Part Three: Mental Health and Psychological Well-Being
CHAPTER 16 ORTHOMOLECULAR PSYCHIATRY:
CHAPTER 17 DEPRESSION 208
CHAPTER 18 ALCOHOLISM 224
CHAPTER 19 ANXIETY DISORDERS 227
CHAPTER 20 EATING DISORDERS 231
CHAPTER 21INSOMNIA 237
CHAPTER 22 OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDERS 239
CHAPTER 23 SCHIZOPHRENIA 243
CHAPTER 24 BEHAVIORAL, AFFECTIVE, AND MENTAL DISORDERS IN
CHILDREN 252
Part Four: Musculoskeletal fitness
CHAPTER 25 ARTHRITIS 269
CHAPTER 26 OSTEOPOROSIS 311
CHAPTER 27 TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT (TMJ) DYSFUNCTION 317
CHAPTER 28 CHIROPRACTIC 320
CHAPTER 29 PAIN MANAGEMENT 333
Part Five: Foot and Leg Care
CHAPTER 30 HEALTHY FEET AND LEGS FOR A LIFETIME 345
CHAPTER 31 COMMON FOOT AND LEG PROBLEMS 369
Part Six: Heart, Blood, and Circulation
CHAPTER 32 HEART DISEASE 387
CHAPTER 33 CHELATION THERAPY 426
CHAPTER 34 ANEMIA 444
Part Seven: Allergy and Environmental Illness
CHAPTER 35 ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE 451
CHAPTER 36 FOOD ALLERGIES 471
CHAPTER 37 ALLERGIES IN CHILDREN 491
Part Eight: Cancer Treatment and Prevention
CHAPTER 38 THE CANCER MICROBE 503
CHAPTER 39 PEPTIDES AND ANTINEOPLASTONS 511
CHAPTER 40 IMMUNO-AUGMENTATIVE THERAPY (IAT) 525
CHAPTER 41 THE WHOLE-BODY ("GANZHEIT") APPROACH 542
CHAPTER 42 "ENVIRONMENTAL" APPROACH TO CANCER THERAPY:
Rebuilding the Body's Natural Healing System 554
Part Nine: Chronic Conditions
CHAPTER 43 DIGESTIVE DISORDERS 571
CHAPTER 44 CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME 593
CHAPTER 45 DIABETES 611
CHAPTER 46 ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME (AIDS) 623
CHAPTER 47 MIGRAINES 644
CHAPTER 48 THYROID DISORDERS 653
Part Ten: Women's Health Throughout the Life Span
CHAPTER 49 MENSTRUATION AND PRE-MENSTRUAL SYNDROME (PMS) 665
CHAPTER 50 SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION IN WOMEN 679
CHAPTER 51 PREGNANCY 85
CHAPTER 52 FEMALE INFERTILITY 707
CHAPTER 53 INFECTIONS 715
CHAPTER 54 ENDOMETRIOSIS 734
CHAPTER 55 BREAST CANCER AND OTHER BREAST DISEASES 742
CHAPTER 56 CERVICAL DYSPLASIA, FIBROIDS, AN REPRODUCTIVE
SYSTEM CANCERS 764
CHAPTER 57 MENOPAUSE 778
Part Eleven: 0f Special Concern to Men
CHAPTER 58 SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION IN MEN 788
CHAPTER 59 MALE INFERTILITY AND RELATED PROBLEMS 797
CHAPTER 60 PROSTATE CONDITIONS 803
Part Twelve: Health, Beauty, and Longevity
CHAPTER 61 REVERSING THE AGING PROCESS NATURALLY 815
CHAPTER 62 BRAIN AGING 833
CHAPTER 63 HOLISTIC DENTISTRY 838
CHAPTER 64 HAIR CARE 846
Part Thirteen: Selecting An Alternative Practitioner
CHAPTER 65 GENERAL GUIDELINES 855
CHAPTER 66 RESOURCE GUIDE 861
INDEX 1057
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Interviews & Essays

On Wednesday, June 23rd, barnesandnoble.com welcomed Gary Null to discuss GET HEALTHY NOW! WITH GARY NULL.

Moderator: Welcome, Gary Null! Thank you for taking the time to join us online this evening to chat about your new book, GET HEALTHY NOW! WITH GARY NULL. How are you doing tonight?

Gary Null: I'm always doing excellent. I revere life too much to complain about anything, because I have seen too often how tenuous our lives can be.


pac87@aol.com from xx: Do you think we as a collective society are too prone to taking prescription pills to help deal with emotional and mental difficulties?

Gary Null: It's not the person's fault that they have generally one of two therapeutic models to choose from for the mental illness. For instance, you can choose from either depressants/tranquilizers or counseling. If all that you have been allowed to believe in are just those limited models, then there is little wonder that after 1.3 trillion dollars spent this year on disease, more than 100 billion just on mental illness, that we have no major cures or breakthroughs in any field. In effect, the game is stacked against us. If, on the other hand, we were allowed or even encouraged to examine such disparate areas as lifestyle -- including diet, nutrients plus deficiencies, heavy metal cerebral toxicity, underactive thyroid, hypoglycemia or low blood sugar, enzyme depletion, cytotoxic chemicals (including artificial sweeteners, dairy, sugar, animal proteins, many processed carbohydrates like white bread), and electromagnetic pollution, as well as maladaptive behavior -- in this case, meaning trying as hard as you can to please others but never honoring your true inner needs and becoming despondent because the more you achieve, the harder you work, the less fulfilled you are -- then, to correct these other causes, [we could] do a complete body and mind cleansing with raw foods, organic juices, elimination diet, proper nutrients supported through supplementation, and surrounding ourselves with nontoxic emotional people. [We could] see that there is an entirely different way of approaching mental illness that is a) more humane, b) noninvasive, and c) does not require forced institutionalization, alienation, and stimulatizing.


Paul from New York City: I have been a fan of yours for quite some time now. My question to you is the following: I am 6 foot 150 pounds, and I want to add some bulk to my frame through weight training and dietary supplements. What advice would you have for somebody like me who wants to add about 10 to 15 pounds to my frame? Also, what are your thoughts on creatine? Are you a fan?

Gary Null: Creatine can be a positive addition if a) you do not overuse it, which can lead to gastric distress, and b) you are not allergic to it. At 6 feet 1 inch and 175 pounds, I have also found myself, as a long-distance runner, vegetarian, and a natural hygienist, having to look what can be done to keep the weight up with a healthy muscle definition and strength. I have found that supplementing my diet with two scoops of a high-quality vegetable protein powder, providing approximately 55 grams of high-quality protein, plus the branch-chained amino acids, and then also putting in nut butters, like walnut butter, hazelnut, almond, or macadamias, into the same shake, provides all of the muscle protoplasmic-spanning protein necessary, and then doing high-rep moderate weight-isolated muscle exercises allows for an easy 10 to 15 pounds of additional muscle mass with no additional fat. Thousands of members of our Natural Living and Walking Club, who were faced with the same problem -- long-distance training, marathon racing, vegetarians, et cetera -- have also been able to do so on a similar regimen. It's also important that you ingest a gallon to a gallon and a half of high-quality fluids, which could include many organic juices.


Bridget from New Jersey: How much of this book is new material? Is some of the information published from your previous books?

Gary Null: It's a combination of new and old. We were obtaining new material for every single chapter in the book right up to the day it went to press. Every single line in the book was examined to see what the most recent information was, including contacting every person quoted in the book, more than 150, to ask them what was new in their treatment modalities.


Eve from Iowa: What change can you make today that will have the biggest impact on your health? Attitude?

Gary Null: Everything begins with attitude. We make the mistake, Eve, of wanting the quick fix. So we rush off to weekend retreats, to mumble with the maharaja, or to seek instantaneous karmic redemption through Deepak, or stand and cheer and scream positive affirmations with Tony, or sit in a medicine circle and weave our dream baskets with Lynn, or seek a course in miracles, or look for the latest infomercial, but in the end all we've done is spend time, money, and effort to send our shadows on a journey that we were fearful of taking. We should begin by asking ourselves who we are. You could say I'm a woman, I'm an American, I work for such and such a company, or I'm a 200-pound man who wants to weigh 170, but these are all superficial answers. Who you are, in a deeper sense, refers to those qualities and characteristics that compose the essential self. It is from this deep inner place that what is truly essential to our well-being resonates a desire for completeness. We take forward our talents and the values that guide us. And along the way we have our whole life process put through a social scrambler, which reconfigures, edits out, and changes the essential for the nonessential. We then carry on with our journey and wonder why we are frustrated. In essence, if you build the Taj Mahal in quicksand it will quickly parallel our own lives: It sinks before us as if we're helpless. What we should do is stop everything -- phones, faxes, media input, and redundant, worthless chatter from those around us -- and ask ourselves: What do I want from this life? And who am I really? And begin to reemerge, no longer willing to adapt to artificial lifestyles, superficial friendships, and financially feasible but spiritually meaningless work. Instead, commit ourselves to that which honors the essential true self only. So there is no longer a disparity between who you truly are and how you have created your living, allowing all sense of the constant unease to evaporate. No more wasting time and energy attempting to dull that feeling, to indulge in escapist habits, to sublimate through chronic work, impulsive behavior. It starts by starting over. When you are willing to start over, ask yourself, or make a list. At the top of the list, on a piece of paper, write: "Here's what I truly want and choose for my happiness," and in each area of your life -- sex, health, career, hobbies, living space, relationships, boundaries -- list what you're willing to accept and then draw a line to where you are at currently in these essential areas, and it will show you how much of an effort you will have to make. We have made it seem almost effortless to adapt to the dysfunctional rather than transcending to a new state of harmony. No more downward adaptations in life. If it doesn't honor you, don't put in it in your body, mind and spirit, people, places, or things. For a while you may be very alone, but persevere.


Jill from Marlboro, MA: Will you be touring and speaking for this book? Any future Learning Annex appearances?

Gary Null: I'm doing a Learning Annex in New York City on July 27th (I think). I'm touring in Washington, D.C., on July 6th at the Lisner Auditorium, at 7pm; in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Sheridan Colony Square Hotel, midtown, on Wednesday, July 7th, at 7pm. Friday, July 9th, Miami Beach Convention Center in Florida. Friday, July 16th, Detroit, Michigan, at Cobo Hall, 1 Washington Boulevard, and Saturday, July 17th, 7pm, Sacramento, California, at the Sacramento Community Convention Center, Crest Theater. That's the extent of the tour for this book. You could go to my web page, garynull.com, which gives a listing of the radio programs and television appearances that I make in the U.S., plus hundreds of articles important to your health, all of which are free.


Kendal from Oak Park, IL: Do you think doctors are too cavalier in their prescription of Viagra? What are your thoughts on the subject matter?

Gary Null: When Viagra first appeared, I was asked to come on NBC for five straight days to debate America's leading urologist. I was the only public health advocate who held a position opposing Viagra. My position was simple. Having worked as a board-certified counselor with a lot of men who were impotent over the years who suffer from other problems, I've seen high levels of positive results by making changes in the person's lifestyle. I simply looked at the manufacturer's package insert for Viagra, and it showed that it was not really conclusive of who would benefit from it because 22 percent of the people who were supposedly impotent were given a placebo and got an erection. It shows you the power of the mind. Next there are over 30 different effects that I would consider dangerous, and mind you, in a study group at least you have control over how many tablets a man takes, but in the real world, men who should not be taking Viagra are going to take it, and many times they don't know they have hypertension. And if one is good, how many people are only going to take one? It was just bad medicine and irresponsible practice when some of the doctors were bragging that they had given it to over 100 patients in only a few days without a comprehensive examination. Even if you assume that the average proper examination would require at least 15 minutes, then it wouldn't be possible to give these prescriptions unless they were giving no exams. I predict that Viagra will be banned in more than two years, leading to more than 300 unnecessary deaths. We are now at more than 200 alleged deaths and counting. If 200 people died from fen-phen or Oraflex or DES or Benedectin, then they would have been yanked from the market much sooner. Such is the power of greed. I can assure you this: They are willing to ban a vitamin such as tryptophan when 13 people died and 1,200 were injured from one defective batch from the manufacturer, who was doing a new genetically engineered process, knowing that tryptophan had been used safely for more than 30 years on 40 million Americans and knowing that it was a single bad batch -- this was rather disingenuous on the part of the FDA, but coincidentally Prozac from Eli Lilly was being launched, and tryptophan would have been the direct competition. All you have to do is look at the double standards in medicine and public health policy. Here we have more than 200 alleged deaths and an untold number of other side effects from Viagra, and yet a wink and a nod from the FDA. The FDA, unfortunately, frequently has its regulatory overseers go to work for the very companies that they were supposed to be objectively regulating. What does it tell us when it costs the average man 300 dollars to get an erection? That's more than they spend on alcohol; that's 3,600 dollars a year -- that's about what they spend on food. Fact is, like it or not, disease and dysfunction are great for business.


Nicole from New York, NY: Gary, how necessary do you think water filters are? I live in NYC and drink water out of the faucet. Am I crazy for doing this? Do you recommend bottled water?

Gary Null: It depends upon how serious you are about your health. If you ask any public health official in New York City, they will tell you the water does not represent any public risk. That is their perspective; mine would be different. I consider chlorine and fluoride to be an unnecessary risk. Also they do not filter out viruses, pesticides, many industrial solvents, and many parasites, and New York City has had a history of having problems with its water. To properly clean up the water in New York would require replacing its water filtration at a cost of 20 billion dollars -- impractical and unfeasible. If you cannot change a problem, then change its significance, downplay it. I am therefore suggesting filtered water, distilled water, or mineral water where you have been prudent enough to contact the bottler to make sure there are no impurities in the spring water. The fact that it says that it's spring water does not mean that it's safe and pure.


Tina from Aurora, CO: In terms of meat in your diet, buffalo -- overrated or really a lot better then beef?

Gary Null: It would be better to ask what is the difference of going to your local mortuary and opening up a coffin, taking out a cadaver leg, shaving it, cutting it off, putting it on a spit, and grilling it. Possibly adding some barbecue sauce. When in Texas, you might eat it raw. There is no difference from a leg of a human or a leg of a buffalo. Before you eat the buffalo, eat your dog, cat, or one of your children. If you are that fascinated with the taste of flesh with blood with it, you are watching too many vampire films. And I would hate to think of kissing a woman who had had her teeth ripping the flesh with blood and pus and bacteria that had been in the meat in her teeth -- it's kind of repulsive. I would have thought that going into the new millennium we would have realized that we do not have to eat flesh. Look at Jesus, Moses, Abraham, Plato, Voltaire as just a few examples of vegetarians. George Bernard Shaw said it best: A man of my spiritual intensity does not eat corpses. I would rather see the buffalo on a range than on a plate. Most of the great religions of the world had components of vegetarianism, including Judaism, Hinduism, et cetera, and there is a belief that the terror and pain that occur at the moment of death of the animal enters you as you eat the flesh of that animal. Look on garynull.com -- there are studies showing the health significance of the vegetarian diet. Less sickness, less violence, less impotency, less obesity. Think of it another way: When you kill the animal, you are eating what the animal ate, including rendered animals, road kill, grease traps from restaurants, industrial sludge, manure, feathers -- all that can be processed and fed to an animal. Would you really want to eat any of that yourself? I think not. It is denatured; it is toxic. Much of the blood is not in the arteries but in the flesh, and it stays there. That's like going in and asking for a glass of blood. Think of the milk mustache. Think of the blood mustache. I am a cannibal. Bon appetit.


Moderator: Thank you, Gary Null! Best of luck with your new book, GET HEALTHY NOW! WITH GARY NULL. Before you leave, do you have any parting thoughts for the online audience?

Gary Null: I appreciate the time and interest you have shown by spending the last hour with me. I'm sorry I don't give short answers, but I hope this has helped you get some brief insights. The book -- GET HEALTHY NOW! WITH GARY NULL -- has a lot more. If I'm invited back, I'll spend even more time with you in the future. I wish you all well.


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