Get Writing: Paragraphs and Essays / Edition 1

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Overview


Students have much to say about their goals, families, jobs, college, and the world around them. GET WRITING: PARAGRAPHS AND ESSAYS develops students' confidence and skills as writers by engaging them in their own writing, through tapping into their personal interests with inventive assignments, prompts, and activities that help them focus their critical thinking skills. Like its successful predecessor, GET WRITING: SENTENCES AND PARAGRAPHS, this paragraph-to-essay text keeps students continually writing with numerous inventive assignments, prompts, and activities that give them the opportunity to express themselves, and build confidence in their ability to create thesis statements, draft and develop paragraphs, and write and revise their own essays.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780155066250
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning
  • Publication date: 1/2/2006
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 720
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author


Mark Connelly teaches at Milwaukee Area Technical College. He is the author of several books including THE SUNDANCE READER, THE SUNDANCE WRITER, and the developmental series GET WRITING.
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Table of Contents


PART I: GETTING STARTED 1. Why Write? Responding to Images. Writing Activity. Goals of This Book. Using Responding to Images. Working Together. What is Good Writing? The Writing Context. Writing Activity. Strategies for Succeeding in Writing Courses. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 2. The Writing Process. Responding to Images. The Writing Process. Step One: Prewrite. Writing Activity. Step Two: Plan. Writing Activity. Step Three: Write. Writing Activity. Step Four: Cool. Step Five: Revise. Step Six: Edit. Avoiding Plagiarism. Writing Under Pressure. Critical Thinking. Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. PART II: DEVELOPING PARAGRAPHS. 3. Developing Topic Sentences and Controlling Ideas. Responding to Images. What is a Paragraph. What Do You Know? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Topic Sentences and Controlling Ideas. Writing Topic Sentences. Paragraphs Without Topic Sentences. Revising Paragraphs. Working Together. Using Paragraph Breaks in Dialogue. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. What Have You Learned? Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 4. Supporting Topic Sentences With Details. Responding to Images. What Are Supporting Details. What Do You Know? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Steps to Building Effective Paragraphs. Types of Support. Blending Support. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. What Have You Learned? Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 5. Developing Paragraphs Using Description. Responding to Images. What isDescription. What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Creating Dominant Impressions. Exam Skills. Improving Dominant Impressions and Support. Readings. Steps to Writing a Descriptive Paragraph. Selecting Topics. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 6. Developing Paragraphs Using Narration. Responding to Images. What is Narration? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Writing Narration: Making a Point. Exam Skills. Writing Narration: Using Transitions. Writing Narration: Using Dialogue. Readings. Steps to Writing a Narrative Paragraph. Selecting Topics. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 7. Developing Paragraphs Using Example. Responding to Images. What is Example? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Writing Example Paragraphs. Types of Examples. Using Hypothetical Examples. Using Transitions. Exam Skills. Readings. Steps to Writing an Example Paragraph. Selecting Topics. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 8. Developing Paragraphs Using Definition. Responding to Images. What is Definition? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Writing Definition: Establishing Meaning. The Purpose of Definition. Methods of Defining. Exam Skills. Readings. Steps to Writing a Definition Paragraph. Selecting Topics. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 9. Developing Paragraphs Using Comparison and Contrast. Responding to Images. What Are Comparison and Contrast? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? The Purposes of Comparison and Contrast. Organizing Comparison Paragraphs. Exam Skills. Readings. Steps to Writing a Comparison and Contrast Paragraph. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 10. Developing Paragraphs Using Division and Classification. Responding to Images. What Are Division and Classification? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Writing Division Paragraphs. Writing Classification Paragraphs. Exam Skills. Readings. Steps to Writing a Division Classification Paragraph. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 11. Developing Paragraphs Using Process. Responding to Images. What is Process? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Writing Paragraphs That Explain. Writing Paragraphs That Give Directions. Exam Skills. Readings. Steps to Writing a Process Paragraph. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 12. Developing Paragraphs Using Cause and Effect. Responding to Images. What is Cause and Effect? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Critical Thinking for Writing Cause and Effect Paragraphs. Exam Skills. Readings. Steps to Writing Cause and Effect Paragraphs. Selecting Topics. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 13. Developing Paragraphs Using Argument. Responding to Images. What is Argument? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Critical Thinking for Writing Argument Paragraphs. Writing Argument Paragraphs. Understanding Your Audience. Exam Skills. Readings. Steps to Writing an Argument Paragraph. Selecting Topics. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. PART III: WRITING ESSAYS. 14. Planning the Essay. Responding to Images. What is an Essay? The Thesis Statement. Organizing Essays. Putting it All Together: Developing an Outline. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 15. Developing Essays. Responding to Images. How to Writers Develop Essays? Description. Narration. Writing Example. Definition. Comparison and Contrast. Division and Classification. Process. Cause and Effect. Argument. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 16. Revising Essays. Responding to Images. What is Revision? Strategies for Revising an Essay. Strategies for Peer Review. Revising Elements of an Essay. Revising an Essay. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 17. Using Sources and MLA Style Documentation. Responding to Images. Why Use and Document Sources? Using Sources? Finding and Locating Sources. What is Documentation? Why Document Sources? What Not to Document. What You Must Document. Using and Documenting Sources. Guidelines for Listing Sources in Works Cited and Parenthetical Notes. Sources and Sample Documented Essay. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 18. Writing at Work. Responding to Images. E-mail. Reports. Resumes and Cover Letters. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. PART IV: IMPROVING STYLE. 19. Improving Essays. Responding to Images. What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Using Consistent Tense. Using Consistent Person. Using Consistent Organization. Using Clear Transitions. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 20. Improving Sentence Variety. Responding to Images. What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Varying Sentence Length. Increasing Sentence Variety With Questions and Exclamations. Varying Sentence Openings. Varying Methods of Joining Ideas. Combining Sentences Using Compound Subjects and Verbs. Combining Sentences Using Appositives. Combining Sentences Using Relative Clauses. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Learned? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 21. Improving Word Choice. Responding to Images. The Power of Words. What Do You Know? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Improving Word Choices. Use Correct Words. Use Effective Words. Delete "Deadhead" Words. Use Appropriate Words. Use Appropriate Idioms. Be Aware of Connotations. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? What Have You Learned? Responding to Images. Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. PART V: UNDERSTANDING GRAMMAR. 22. Understanding the Sentence. Responding to Images. What is a Sentence? What Do You Know? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? The Parts of Speech. Subjects and Verbs. Building Sentences with Independent and Dependent Clauses. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? What Have You Learned? Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 23. Avoiding Fragments. Responding to Images. What Do You Know? What are Fragments? Correcting Fragments. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. Points to Remember. 24. Building Sentences Using Coordination and Subordination. Responding to Images. What Do You Know? What are Coordination and Subordination? What Are You Trying to Say? What Have You Written? Types of Sentences. Coordination. Subordination. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 25. Repairing Run-ons and Comma Splices. Responding to Images. What Are Run-ons? What Do You Know? Run-Ons: Fused Sentences and Comma Splices. Identifying Run-ons. Run-ons Needing Minor Repairs. Run-ons Needing Major Repairs. Methods of Repairing Run-ons. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 26. Correcting Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers. Responding to Images. What Are Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers? Dangling Modifiers. What Do You Know? Avoiding Dangling Modifiers. Misplaced Modifiers. Working Together. Cumulative Exercise. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 27. Understanding Parallelism. Responding to Parallelism? What Do You Know? Overcoming Parallelism Errors. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 28. Subject-Verb Agreement. Responding to Images. What is Subject-Verb Agreement? What Do You Know? Grammar Choices and Meaning. Special Nouns and Pronouns. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Cumulative Exercise. Working Together. Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 29. Verb Tense, Mood, and Voice. Responding to Images. What Is Tense? What Do You Know? Helping Verbs. Regular and Irregular Verbs. Problem Verbs: Lie/Lay, Rise/Raise, Set/Sit. Shifts in Tense. Subjunctive Mood. Active and Passive Voice. Other Verb Problems. Double Negatives. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 30. Pronoun Reference, Agreement, and Case. Responding to Images. What Are Pronouns? What Do You Know? Types of Pronouns. Using Pronouns. Pronoun Reference. Pronoun Agreement. Singular and Plural Nouns and Pronouns. Avoiding Sexism. Avoiding Shifts in Point of View. Using the Right Case. Plural Constructions. Comparisons. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 31. Adjectives and Adverbs. Responding to Images. What Are Adjectives and Adverbs? What Do You Know? Understanding Adjectives. Understanding Adverbs. Grammar Choices and Meaning. Comparisons. Superlatives. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. PART VI: UNDERSTANDING PUNCTUATION AND MECHANICS. 32. Using Commas and Semicolons. Responding to Images. What Are Commas and Semicolons? What Do You Know? The Comma. Semicolons. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 33. Using Other Marks of Punctuation. Responding to Images. What Are the Other Marks of Punctuation? What Do You Know? The Apostrophe. Quotation Marks. Colon. Parentheses. Brackets. Dash. Hyphen. Ellipsis. Slash. Question Mark. Exclamation Point. Period. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 34. Using Capitalization. Responding to Images. What is Capitalization? What Do You Know? Rules for Capitalization. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. 35. Correcting Spelling Errors. Responding to Images. What Do You Know? Steps to Improving Spelling. Commonly Misspelled Words. Commonly Confused Words. Forming Plurals. Adding Endings. Cumulative Exercise. Working Together. Critical Thinking. What Have You Written? Writing on the Web. What Have You Learned? Points to Remember. PART VII: READINGS FOR WRITERS. Reading in College. Strategies for Critical Reading. Reading with a Writer's Eye. Description: Lansing Lamont, The Bomb. Ronald Reagan, Jack. Narration: Lucy Grealy, Truth and Beauty. Maya Angelou, Champion of the World. Example: Anna Quindlen, Homeless. Tony Brown, Death of a Dream. Definition: Isaac Asimov, What is Intelligence? Janice Castro, Spanglish. Comparison and Contrast: Rachel Carson, A Fable for Tomorrow. Azadeh Moaveni, Maman and America. Division and Classification: Cornel West, Black Political Leadership. Russell Baker, The Plot Against People. Process: Larry King, Talking to People. Armond D. Budish, Fender Benders: Do's and Don't's. Cause and Effect: Norman Cousins, Who Killed Benny Paret? Steven Reiss and James Wiltz, Why America Loves Reality TV. Argument: Lance Morrow, Why I Changed My Mind on the Death Penalty. Mary Sherry, In Praise of the F Word . HANDBOOK. Basic Sentence Structure. Sentence Errors. Modifiers. Faulty Parallelism. Verbs. Pronouns. Adjectives and Adverbs. Comma. Semi-colon. Apostrophe. Quotation Marks. Colon. Parentheses. Brackets. Dash. Hyphen. Ellipsis. Slash. Question Mark. Exclamation Point. Period. Capitalization. Spelling. Two Hundred Topics for College Writing. Answers to the Odd-Numbered Exercises. Credits. Index.
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