Get Your Wings

Get Your Wings

4.0 2
by Aerosmith
     
 

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Often overshadowed by the subsequent twin highlights of Toys in the Attic and Rocks, Aerosmith's 1974 second album, Get Your Wings, is where Aerosmith became Aerosmith -- it's where they teamed up with producer Jack Douglas, it's where they shed much of their influences and developed their own

Overview

Often overshadowed by the subsequent twin highlights of Toys in the Attic and Rocks, Aerosmith's 1974 second album, Get Your Wings, is where Aerosmith became Aerosmith -- it's where they teamed up with producer Jack Douglas, it's where they shed much of their influences and developed their own trademark sound, it's where they turned into songwriters, it's where Steven Tyler unveiled his signature obsessions with sex and sleaze. Chief among these attributes may be Douglas, who either helped the band ease into the studio or captured their sound in a way their debut never did. This is a leaner, harder album, bathed in grease and layered in grit, but it's not just down to Douglas. The band itself sounds more distinctive. There are blues in Joe Perry and Joey Kramer's interplay, but this leapfrogs over blues-rock; it turns into slippery hard rock. To be sure, it's still easy to hear the Stones here, but they never really sound Stonesy; there's almost more of the Yardbirds to the way the group works the riffs, particularly evident on the cover of the early 'Birds classic "The Train Kept a Rollin'." But if the Yardbirds were tight and nervy, Aerosmith is blown out and loose, the sound of excess incarnate -- that is, in every way but the writing itself, which is confident and strong, fueled by Tyler's gonzo sex drive. He is the "Lord of the Thighs," playing that "Same Old Song and Dance," but he also slows down enough for the eerie "Seasons of Wither," a powerful slow-churning ballad whose mastery of atmosphere is a good indication of how far the band has grown. They never attempted anything quite so creepy on their debut, but it isn't just that Aerosmith is trying newer things on Get Your Wings, it's that they're doing their bloozy bluster better and bolder, which is what turns this sophomore effort into their first classic.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/07/1993
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0074645736129
catalogNumber:
57361
Rank:
9785

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Aerosmith   Primary Artist
Joe Perry   Acoustic Guitar,Percussion,Electric Guitar,Vocals,12-string Guitar,Slide Guitar
Michael Brecker   Tenor Saxophone
Randy Brecker   Trumpet
Stan Bronstein   Baritone Saxophone
Ray Colcord   Keyboards
Joey Kramer   Percussion,Drums,Vocals
Steven Tyler   Acoustic Guitar,Bass,Harmonica,Percussion,Piano,Keyboards,Vocals
Brad Whitford   Electric Guitar
Tom Hamilton   Electric Bass
Jon Pearson   Trombone
Roy Colcord   Keyboards

Technical Credits

Ray Colcord   Producer
Jack Douglas   Producer,Engineer,Audio Production
Bob Ezrin   Executive Producer
Jay Messina   Engineer
Rod O'Brien   Engineer
David Krebs   Art Direction
Steve Leber   Art Direction
Darren S. Winston   Creative Consultant
Charles Walters   Liner Notes
Keith Garde   Creative Supervision
James Diener   Direction
Howie Kay   Composer
D. Solomon   Composer
Roy Colcord   Audio Production

Customer Reviews

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Get Your Wings 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
asian_brave More than 1 year ago
Though this album was almost Aerosmith's last album, it is one of my personal favorites! For those of you out there who only know Aerosmith for "Walk This Way" and "Dream On," you definitely need to give this album a try! With a sound not unlike their first album, Get Your Wings is a fun work of music with the classic Aerosmith sound and any Aerosmith fan will appreciate this album despite its bad reviews. This is definitely one of my favorite albums of all time!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This CD was pretty good including Train Kept a Rollin, but most of the tracks are just plain inappropriet or just wrong