Getting Away With Murder

Getting Away With Murder

by Barbara Victor, Raoul Felder
     
 

There is a war being waged on women in America. Every eighteen seconds, somewhere in the United States, a woman is beaten by her husband or boyfriend. In 1994, nearly half the women murdered in America were killed by their spouse or lover. And these men will probably get a lighter sentence than they would have for assaulting or killing a stranger because their victims… See more details below

Overview

There is a war being waged on women in America. Every eighteen seconds, somewhere in the United States, a woman is beaten by her husband or boyfriend. In 1994, nearly half the women murdered in America were killed by their spouse or lover. And these men will probably get a lighter sentence than they would have for assaulting or killing a stranger because their victims were once their lovers. Raoul Felder, one of the best-known and most successful divorce lawyers in the country, has heard chilling stories of physical beatings and emotional tortures, stories that he might never have believed if he hadn't seen the evidence of this torment with his own eyes. Drawing from his years of experience, Felder and journalist Barbara Victor have delivered a riveting report from the front lines of this war, complete with a plan of attack that includes all the best weapons to fight back against this horror. What these authors have done is talk to everyone involved with domestic violence from the cop who hates to take domestic dispute calls to the district attorney, judge, or social worker who feels that he can't offer the protection that a victim needs. Additionally, they have interviewed both the victim and the batterer to help us understand the forces that shape this relationship. From each of these, the authors let us hear what is needed to stop the violence now and make suggestions on how we can help change the law or the way things are done to keep it stopped in the future. In Getting Away with Murder you'll discover the first crucial steps that must be taken. Here, you will find the tools necessary to make a difference.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The analysis of domestic violence by lawyer Felder (The Lawyers' Guide to Equitable Distribution) and freelancer Victor (Friends, Lovers, Enemies) discusses why little is being done to improve the situation. The question "Why didn't she leave?" blames the victim, they assert. They show how the battered woman is also victimized by police, therapists who urge joint counseling and even the law itself, which makes a distinction between a man who beats a stranger on the street and one who beats his wife at home. Given male and female archetypes in our society, every man is a potential batterer, maintain the authors as they examine the meager attempts by local government agencies to curb domestic violence. They argue that more can be brought to bear to end what the AMA describes as "America's dirty little secret"-imprisonment, for example-but what the authors prefer to label "America's tacit little agreement." (Mar.)
Kirkus Reviews
This earnest polemic suffers from a fatal lack of proportion.

Star divorce lawyer Felder and journalist Victor (Voice of Reason: Hanan Ashrawi and Peace in the Middle East, 1994) make a persuasive case, for those who remain unconvinced, that our criminal justice system fails to adequately protect battered women; to their credit, they not only describe the problem's many aspects but recommend solutions. Some of their ideas make sense, such as better communication among the medical, social service, and judicial systems in order to track the histories of victims and abusers. Other of their ideas merit debate, such as mandating arrests when domestic violence is a possibility, so that cops will not ignore an incident for fear of a wrongful arrest lawsuit. But the authors focus so narrowly on the need to protect victims that the surrounding reality gets blurred. They zealously demand that every injury that a medical professional suspects may involve battering be reported to authorities, as some states require in cases of suspected child abuse, and dismiss as "politically correct" the view, common among advocates for battered women, that an adult woman should be deemed capable of deciding whether to subject her relationship to months of police and judicial scrutiny. They endorse giving every woman who enters a hospital, for whatever reason, a detailed questionnaire to determine if she is a secret victim. They would subject a doctor or nurse to criminal liability for accepting a "blatantly implausible" explanation of an injury, thus enlisting people trained in medicine, not police work, as criminal investigators. They propose that every man who is charged with domestic violence, even if acquitted, be required to undergo treatment. They advocate a domestic violence program "in every church, synagogue, school, university, government agency, and private corporation across the country."

Reduces a tragedy to what seems a parody of well-intentioned reform.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780684833330
Publisher:
Touchstone
Publication date:
10/07/1997
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
0.66(w) x 5.50(h) x 8.50(d)

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