Getting Graphic! Comics for Kids

Getting Graphic! Comics for Kids

by Michele Gorman, Jimmy Gownley
     
 

Finally—a resource for selecting graphic novels at the elementary level! Getting Graphic! Comics for Kids is the first comprehensive listing of graphic novels specifically targeted for the elementary reader. This handy resource includes annotated bibliographies of graphic novels for kids 6-12, all carefully reviewed by Michele Gorman, one of today's

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Overview

Finally—a resource for selecting graphic novels at the elementary level! Getting Graphic! Comics for Kids is the first comprehensive listing of graphic novels specifically targeted for the elementary reader. This handy resource includes annotated bibliographies of graphic novels for kids 6-12, all carefully reviewed by Michele Gorman, one of today's leading authorities on graphic novels in the library world. No more worrying whether the graphic novel content is appropriate for young readers. Now, there is a book you can trust to help you develop a quality, age-appropriate graphic novel collection for young readers, including fiction, nonfiction, and manga. It also contains more than 15 pages from some of the most popular comics for kids today, helping librarians and teachers understand the appeal of this popular format.You'll alsofind a foreword by Jeff Smith, renowned creator of the Bone graphic novel series, as well as original cover art featuring cartoonist Jimmy Gownley's adorable cast of characters from his outstanding Amelia Rules! series. This is a must have for elementary school librarians, public librarians, elementary teachers, and administrators.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This book will be warmly welcomed by librarians and others who are faced with ever younger children clamoring to read graphic novels. An original Jimmy Gownley "Amelia Rules!" episode opens the book, offering a taste of age-appropriate comic fiction. The short introduction features a list of reasons to collect graphic novels for kids ages 4-12. The book is then divided into sections on comic fiction, manga, and comic nonfiction. Each section presents a collection of titles with descriptions and recommended age range. There are full-page reproductions from titles discussed, providing a much-needed opportunity to evaluate the graphic aspects of the works. Where the comic fiction section describes a slew of unique titles, many of the manga titles will be familiar from television cartoons or video games. The comic nonfiction covers too many titles from educational series, with over half the chapter devoted to a single series from one publisher. Despite the apparent unevenness in what's available, this is a solid reference that will help librarians make informed decisions as they build graphic novel collections. Bibliography. Glossary. Web sites. Index. Recommended." - Library Media Connection
Library Journal

In the rush to convince everyone that "comics aren't just for kids," K-12 level graphic novels seemed to drop off industry radar. Then publishers woke up. Kids reading comics grow into teens and adults reading comics-and, because comics are a wonderful tool for literacy, just reading, period. So 2006 and 2007 were banner years for children's graphic novels. Gorman provides annotations with plot summaries and age ratings for over 270 recommended titles: manga (including original English-language manga), fiction other than manga, and nonfiction. Black-and-white comics excerpts lend pizzazz to the book and help sell the concept, and a glossary and resources section round out the work. North Carolina librarian Gorman writes the "Getting Graphic!" column in Library Media Connection and authored the information-packed Getting Graphic! Using Graphic Novels To Promote Literacy with Preteens and Teens(Linworth, 2003). Her latest will be invaluable for book selection, RA, and as a resource when parents ask, "Are comics safe for my kid?" Essential for public and school libraries.
—Martha Cornog

School Library Journal

Building upon the foundation of Getting Graphic! Using Graphic Novels to Promote Literacy with Preteens and Teens (Linworth, 2003), Gorman has developed a companion guide to childrena's titles. Approximately 110 individual citations are organized into three sections. "Comic Fiction" includes 69 annotations: 41 are stand-alone or first titles in a series and 28 are multiple-volume graphic novels. Ten series annotations also include a brief description of each title in the series. "Manga" begins with an introduction to the format and cites 14 Japanese and 13 Original English Language titles. Since graphic nonfiction represents a small segment of graphic works, "Comic Nonfiction" is limited to series listings and 11 stand-alone titles, two of which are usually classified as fiction. Annotations include general publication information and recommended grade-level designations based on the authora's determination of "developmentally appropriate" content and reading level. One outstanding feature is the inclusion of 22 black-and-white reproductions of pages from a variety of graphic novels, giving readers a firsthand glimpse into format, comic style, and readability. Librarians and teachers starting a childrena's graphic-novel collection will find this volume useful.-Barbara M. Moon, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586833275
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/28/2007
Pages:
100
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.30(d)

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