Getting the Most Out of Clinical Training and Supervision: A Guide to Practicum Students and Interns

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More About This Textbook

Overview

Clinical training in psychotherapy is challenging for supervisees, many of whom are unsure how to navigate the supervisory process and effectively build clinical skills and professional competence. This volume, aimed at students and interns, is written in a user-friendly, interactive style with "real life" case examples and reflection activities. The authors describe how to establish effective working relationships with supervisors and understand the evaluation process. Empirically-supported yet highly practical, this book normalizes the anxieties and conflicts that typically arise during supervision and will be welcomed by students and interns at all levels of experience.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Christopher J Graver, PhD, ABPP-CN(Madigan Healthcare System)
Description: Supervision is an active process between two parties, requiring input from the supervisor and equal involvement from the supervisee. These authors previously published a book for the supervisor; this is the counterpart for students and advanced trainees.
Purpose: The aim is to assist students or trainees in navigating the dynamic supervision relationship and making the most of the process. Although the book is empirically based, it is meant as a practical guide.
Audience: The primary audience is students and trainees in psychology, but the book could be used by counselors or social workers. The authors are nationally known experts in supervision.
Features: The book begins with an overview of foundational competencies and introduces some of the transitions students will be undertaking as they enter clinical training in need of a supervisory relationship. Self-reflective activities in each chapter are of varying usefulness, but the examples of supervisor-supervisee situations and potential solutions at the end of the chapter are more consistently helpful. After the introductory chapters, the book seems to stray into therapeutic topics that are not directly related to the issue of supervision (e.g., discussing stages of change in a client). Additional therapeutic issues are raised, such as countertransference and case conceptualization, but again the link to the supervisor-supervisee relationship is not clear. As a concrete example, the book discusses boundary violations with clients, but really should have been discussing boundary violations with supervisors. Eventually the book returns to relevant topics, such as confidentiality in a supervisory relationship, but this is well covered in the authors' previous book, making this chapter repetitive. The information on handling poor supervision given the power differential is probably the most unique and useful chapter from a student perspective. The references are current, but not always relevant given the way the book strays from supervision at times.
Assessment: Although this book has an admirable goal of providing a practical guide for students in supervision, it strays from this goal with too much general psychotherapy and clinical advice and not enough unique contributions to practically help students make the most of supervision and the challenges that arise in the supervisory relationship.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Christopher J. Graver, PhD, ABPP-CN(Madigan Healthcare System)
Description: Supervision is an active process between two parties, requiring input from the supervisor and equal involvement from the supervisee. These authors previously published a book for the supervisor; this is the counterpart for students and advanced trainees.
Purpose: The aim is to assist students or trainees in navigating the dynamic supervision relationship and making the most of the process. Although the book is empirically based, it is meant as a practical guide.
Audience: The primary audience is students and trainees in psychology, but the book could be used by counselors or social workers. The authors are nationally known experts in supervision.
Features: The book begins with an overview of foundational competencies and introduces some of the transitions students will be undertaking as they enter clinical training in need of a supervisory relationship. Self-reflective activities in each chapter are of varying usefulness, but the examples of supervisor-supervisee situations and potential solutions at the end of the chapter are more consistently helpful. After the introductory chapters, the book seems to stray into therapeutic topics that are not directly related to the issue of supervision (e.g., discussing stages of change in a client). Additional therapeutic issues are raised, such as countertransference and case conceptualization, but again the link to the supervisor-supervisee relationship is not clear. As a concrete example, the book discusses boundary violations with clients, but really should have been discussing boundary violations with supervisors. Eventually the book returns to relevant topics, such as confidentiality in a supervisory relationship, but this is well covered in the authors' previous book, making this chapter repetitive. The information on handling poor supervision given the power differential is probably the most unique and useful chapter from a student perspective. The references are current, but not always relevant given the way the book strays from supervision at times.
Assessment: Although this book has an admirable goal of providing a practical guide for students in supervision, it strays from this goal with too much general psychotherapy and clinical advice and not enough unique contributions to practically help students make the most of supervision and the challenges that arise in the supervisory relationship.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781433810497
  • Publisher: American Psychological Association
  • Publication date: 12/15/2011
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 592,372
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

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