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The Gettysburg Address
     

The Gettysburg Address

4.1 26
by Abraham Lincoln
 

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The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, considered one of the most well known in American history. It was delivered by Lincoln during the American Civil War, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies

Overview

The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, considered one of the most well known in American history. It was delivered by Lincoln during the American Civil War, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Abraham Lincoln's carefully crafted address, secondary to other presentations that day, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history. In just over two minutes, Lincoln reiterated the principles of human equality espoused by the Declaration of Independence and proclaimed the Civil War as a struggle for the preservation of the Union sundered by the secession crisis, with "a new birth of freedom," that would bring true equality to all of its citizens, ensuring that democracy would remain a viable form of government and creating a nation in which states' rights were no longer dominant.

Beginning with the now-iconic phrase "Four score and seven years ago," referring to the Declaration of Independence during the American Revolution in 1776, Lincoln examined the founding principles of the United States in the context of the Civil War, and memorialized the sacrifices of those who gave their lives at Gettysburg and extolled virtues for the listeners (and the nation) to ensure the survival of America's representative democracy, that the "government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."

Despite the speech's prominent place in the history and popular culture of the United States, the exact wording and location of the speech are disputed. The five known manuscripts of the Gettysburg Address differ in a number of details and also differ from contemporary newspaper reprints of the speech. Modern scholarship locates the speakers' platform 40 yards (or more) away from the Traditional Site within Soldiers' National Cemetery at the Soldiers' National Monument and entirely within private, adjacent Evergreen Cemetery.

Following the July 1–3, 1863, Battle of Gettysburg, reburial of Union soldiers from the Gettysburg Battlefield graves began on October 17. The committee for the November 19 Consecration of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg invited President Lincoln: "It is the desire that, after the Oration, you, as Chief Executive of the nation, formally set apart these grounds to their sacred use by a few appropriate remarks." Lincoln's address followed the oration by Edward Everett, who subsequently included a copy of the Gettysburg Address in his 1864 book about the event (Address of the Hon. Edward Everett At the Consecration of the National Cemetery At Gettysburg, 19th November 1863, with the Dedicatory Speech of President Lincoln, and the Other Exercises of the Occasion; Accompanied by An Account of the Origin of the Undertaking and of the Arrangement of the Cemetery Grounds, and by a Map of the Battle-field and a Plan of the Cemetery).
During the train trip from Washington, D.C., to Gettysburg on November 18, Lincoln remarked to John Hay that he felt weak. On the morning of November 19, Lincoln mentioned to John Nicolay that he was dizzy. In the railroad car the President rode with his secretary, John G. Nicolay, his assistant secretary, John Hay, the three members of his Cabinet who accompanied him, William Seward, John Usher and Montgomery Blair, several foreign officials and others. Hay noted that during the speech Lincoln’s face had ‘a ghastly color’ and that he was ‘sad, mournful, almost haggard.' After the speech, when Lincoln boarded the 6:30pm train for Washington, D.C., he was feverish and weak, with a severe headache. A protracted illness followed, which included a vesicular rash and was diagnosed as a mild case of smallpox. It thus seems highly likely that Lincoln was in the prodromal period of smallpox when he delivered the Gettysburg address.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940015642698
Publisher:
Balefire Publishing
Publication date:
09/24/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
3
File size:
225 KB

Meet the Author

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln successfully led his country through its greatest constitutional, military and moral crisis--the American Civil War--preserving the Union while ending slavery, and promoting economic and financial modernization. Reared in a poor family on the western frontier, Lincoln was mostly self-educated, and became a country lawyer, a Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator during the 1830s, and a one-term member of the United States House of Representatives during the 1840s. After a series of debates in 1858 that gave national visibility to his opposition to the expansion of slavery, Lincoln lost a Senate race to his arch-rival, Stephen A. Douglas. Lincoln, a moderate from a swing state, secured the Republican Party nomination. With almost no support in the South, Lincoln swept the North and was elected president in 1860. His election was the signal for seven southern slave states to declare their secession from the Union and form the Confederacy. The departure of the Southerners gave Lincoln's party firm control of Congress, but no formula for compromise or reconciliation was found, and the war came.

When the North enthusiastically rallied behind the national flag after the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861, Lincoln concentrated on the military and political dimensions of the war effort. His goal was now to reunify the nation. As the South was in a state of insurrection, Lincoln exercised his authority to suspend habeas corpus in that situation, arresting and detaining thousands of suspected secessionists without their trials. Lincoln prevented British recognition of the Confederacy by skillfully handling the Trent affair in late 1861. His efforts toward the abolition of slavery include issuing his Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, encouraging the border states to outlaw slavery, and helping push through Congress the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which finally freed all the black slaves nationwide in December 1865. Lincoln closely supervised the war effort, especially the selection of top generals, including commanding general Ulysses S. Grant.

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The Gettysburg Address 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This version is the best!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Gettysburg Adress is one the most signifigent speeches in U.S history. Lincoln gives new hope to one of the bloodiest wars ever. By reading this I think that every one will truly understand why Gettysburg is so important
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have always enjoyed reading this
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pretty good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am in history readig this right now. ;)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
4 snores and 7 yawns, ago this speech critic listoned to the president's speech, and lets be honest Abe you dropped a real lincoln log. Do you know the real gettysburg adress? 1108 West Boring Street. And giving it on the field, great aduido sorry if i couldn't hear you was in the second row.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have memorized the gettysburg address by heart and am only 9 years old
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IT IS A NICE COOL BOOK
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Only 8 pages. Very short. Multiple errors in the address. You can find better versions on the internet and you can print them out.
Janeice Lopez More than 1 year ago
I like this book i read itin school its cool and interisting facts about the civil war i love ths book vut it doesnt let u read a sample thats notcool cause i want to see samplws before i buy it bye for now
Monica Elizondo More than 1 year ago
this is so good for a book report
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I haven't read this yet, and ya know what? I bet they didn't add the part before the adress and after the battle Lincoln had all the Yankees have a proper burial and left the Rebels on the feild! I'm not siding with the Rebels I'm shocked that an American president left Americans out on the feild to rot. Yes, I know the Rebels seperated from the u.s. but they were just as American though first called Southern as their Northern counterparts
Joseph Foster More than 1 year ago
Good free read. A few errors.