Gettysburg

( 50 )

Overview

The Battle of Gettysburg has become the great "what if" of American history. Gettysburg unfolds an alternate path and creates for General Robert E. Lee the victory he might have won. Full of dramatic battle scenes, military strategy, and captivating period details, Gettysburg stands as a remarkable entry in the pantheon of Civil War literature and as a vivid novel of the realities of war.

The year is 1863, and General Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia are poised to...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback - First Edition)
$8.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (59) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $5.06   
  • Used (51) from $1.99   
Gettysburg: A Novel of the Civil War

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - First Edition)
$8.99
BN.com price

Overview

The Battle of Gettysburg has become the great "what if" of American history. Gettysburg unfolds an alternate path and creates for General Robert E. Lee the victory he might have won. Full of dramatic battle scenes, military strategy, and captivating period details, Gettysburg stands as a remarkable entry in the pantheon of Civil War literature and as a vivid novel of the realities of war.

The year is 1863, and General Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia are poised to attack the North and claim the victory that could end the brutal conflict. Launching his men into a vast sweeping operation, General Lee, acting as he did at Chancellorsville, Second Manassas, and Antietam, displays the audacity of old. He knows he has but one more good chance to gain ultimate victory. Now Lee's lieutenants and the men in the ranks, imbued with this renewed spirit of the offensive, embark on the Gettysburg Campaign that many dream "should have been"...

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Surprisingly plausible, written with compelling narrative force and meticulous detail."

-The Atlanta Journal Constitution

"Gingrich and Forschten write with authority and with sensitivity."-St. Louis Post Dispatch

"[Gettysburg] is believable and beautifully written...every bit as good as Michael Sharra's The Killer Angels. Not only do Gingrich and Forstchen bring the characters to life, and often horrible death, but they do so with memorable observations on the ways of war and vivid, technically accurate descriptions of frightful Civil War combat."-The Courier Journal (Kentucky)

"An eye-opener...filled with gore, smoke, heat of battle and a surprise ending. The writing is vivid and clear. A ripping good read."-Washington Times

"Well-executed alternative history. The authors show thorough knowledge of the people, weapons, tactics, and ambience of the civil war. A veritable feast."-Publishers Weekly

"As historical fiction this stands beside The Killer Angels. As an alternative history of Gettysburg, it stands alone. The mastery of operational history enables the authors to expand the story's scope. The narrative is so clear that the action can be followed without maps. And the characters are sometimes heartbreakingly true to their historical originals."-Dennis Showalter, Former President of the Society of Military Historians

"Gettysburg is a creative, clever, and fascinating 'what if?' novel that promises to excite and entertain America's legions of Civil War buffs."-James Carville

"The novel Gettysburg puts forth an highly plausible and exciting scenario of a Confederate victory in the Pennsylvania campaign of 1863. The authors exhibit an in depth knowledge of not only technical details, but also the various personalities of the leaders how they could have reacted had things gone quite differently from history as we know it."-Don Troiani, noted Civil War artist

Publishers Weekly
This well-executed alternative history imagines a Confederate victory at Gettysburg. Former House speaker Gingrich (Contract with America) and historical fiction author Forstchen (Down to the Sea) create a plausible scenario: Robert E. Lee resolves to command, rather than merely coordinate, the efforts of that gaggle of prima donnas known as the high command of the Army of Northern Virginia. Thus, when he leads them into battle against the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg, he does not commit his soldiers to a desperate head-butting on the ground chosen by the Union's General Meade. Instead, he maneuvers around the Union flank, placing his tightly run army between Meade and Washington, D.C., scooping up Union supplies and forcing Meade to launch desperate attacks with disastrous results for the Union cause. The authors show thorough knowledge of the people, weapons, tactics and ambience of the Civil War, though their portrayals of historical figures like Lee, Meade, James Longstreet and Richard Ewell betray a certain bias (the Confederate men are noble and wise, the Union leaders hot-tempered and vindictive). The novel has a narrative drive and vigor that makes the climactic battle scene a real masterpiece of its kind (it's not for the weak of stomach). The military minutiae probably makes the book inaccessible to anyone who's not a Civil War buff or military fiction fan, but those two sizable groups will find this a veritable feast. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Gettysburg was the pivotal battle of the Civil War, and enthusiasts often speculate on how history might have been changed if the Confederacy had won. Gingrich, former speaker of the House of Representatives, and historical writer Forstchen have penned a fascinating version of that famous battle, addressing in detail many a Southerner's fantasy. On July 1, 1863, the Army of Virginia, under the command of Gen. Robert E. Lee, and the Army of the Potomac, under Gen. George G. Meade, clashed in deadly combat near Gettysburg, PA. Of course, Union forces won, but Gingrich and Forstchen imagine a different outcome in which Confederate forces do a surprise march around Union lines to flank and cut off the Union troops from their supply and information routes. In the course of their narrative, the authors depict the gallantry and heroism of Lee, Longstreet, Chamberlain, Hancock, Hunt, and many other officers and enlisted men on both sides of the conflict. Gettysburg will appeal to Civil War aficionados. Readers may also be interested in Michael Sharra's prize-winning The Killer Angels, now considered the best fictional account of the battle.-Thomas L. Kilpatrick, formerly with Southern Illinois Univ. Lib., Carbondale Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The former Speaker of the House and a military historian take a what-if look at the historic battle. July 1, 1863: the end of a long day of mutual slaughter. Cemetery Hill and Cemetery Ridge have happened bloodily, the death toll in the thousands. Emotionally as well as physically drained, the legendary Robert E. Lee, commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, sits in his tent missing the late great Stonewall Jackson, as well as cavalry General Jeb Stuart, off somewhere raiding, apparently having forgotten that he's supposed to be Lee's "eyes." Though only recently appointed to command, the far from legendary George E. Meade, Lee's opposite number, is at the moment feeling pretty good about himself and the way day one has gone. He's fought the vaunted Lee to a standstill, and is now advantageously positioned along Cemetery Ridge, looking down at Lee's forces with reason to contemplate day two optimistically. All this history tells us. Ah, but what if while Lee contemplates day two, he has a radical (uncharacteristic) change of heart? What if he listens to the counsel of his play-it-safe general Pete Longstreet and decides not to throw 15,000 men into an ill-fated attack? Then, Gingrich and Forstchen tell us, he might have swung south in the kind of flanking maneuver that worked so well for him at Second Manassas. No more the doomed, disastrous Pickett's Charge. And, in fact, no more Army of the Potomac. A smashing victory for Lee. Ultimately decisive? About that, Gingrich and Forstchen remain positively cryptic. Authoritative military history, well-rendered battle scenes. Inevitably, though, it suffers by comparison to Michael Shaara's The Killer Angels. Shaara breathed life into thaticonic Gettysburg cast; Gingrich-Forstchen can't quite manage it.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312987251
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 4/5/2005
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 544
  • Sales rank: 230,238
  • Product dimensions: 4.19 (w) x 6.71 (h) x 1.15 (d)

Meet the Author

Newt Gingrich

NEWT GINGRICH, former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, is the author of five. He is the CEO of The Gingrich Group and an analyst for the Fox News Channel.

DR. WILLIAM R. FORSTCHEN is the author of over thirty works of historical fiction, science fiction, young adult works, and traditional historical research. He holds a Ph.D. with a specialization in military history from Purdue University.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Gettysburg

A Novel of the Civil War
By Newt Gingrich William R. Forstchen and Albert S. Hanser

Thomas Dunne Books

Copyright © 2003 Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen
All right reserved.

ISBN: 031230935X


Chapter One

June 28, 1863, 8:00 PM

Headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia Chambersburg, Pennsylvania

The shadows of twilight deepened across the orchards and wheat fields of the Cumberland Valley. The day had been hot, the air heavy with damp heat; now the first stirring of a cooling breeze came down from out of the hills. Fireflies danced through the branches of apple, peach, and cherry trees; crickets sang; and as he rode through the rows of the orchard he breathed the rich evening air of summer, feeling a moment of peace.

He looked up at the moon riding in the eastern sky, nearly full, glowing with an orange warmth, the cold light of the stars beginning to fill the heavens.

As he approached the knoll, the orchard gave way to pasture, the fence dividing the two fields broken down, the split rails so laboriously cut and laid in place gone, except for a few upright posts. He had spoken more than once about this, to not touch the property of these people, but after a hard day's march such fences were easy to burn, and the pasture ahead was dotted with glowing fires. An entire winter of a farmer's labor to fence this field gone now in a single night.

He reined in, not wanting to venture closer to where the troops were camped. Shadows moved about the flickering lights, the scent of wood smoke drifting on the cool breeze mingled with all the other scents of the army ... horses, men, food cooking, grease, sweat-soaked wool uniforms, oiled leather, latrines, the heavy mix both repugnant and comforting, the smells that had been his life for over thirty years.

Songs floated on the wind. A boy, Irish from the sound of him, was singing "He's Gone Away." He listened for a moment, feeling a cool shiver, "... But he's coming back, if he goes ten thousand miles."

The boy finished. The song had struck a nerve. More than one of the men coughed to hide the tears; there was a forced laugh, then another song; it sounded like "The Girl I Left Behind Me," but the lyrics were not familiar. He suddenly caught one of the stanzas. It was not the traditional song; it was one of the new verses that soldiers always enjoyed making up.

He listened for a moment, and in the shadows he allowed himself to smile. It wasn't as obscene as some and no worse than some of the songs he had sung when a cadet at the Point so many years ago.

He thought of Thomas Jackson. Thomas would have ridden straight into the camp and scattered them, then delivered a stern sermon about such sinful practices, urging the men to pray instead.

Thomas, how I miss you.

The voices around the nearest campfire stilled. Some of the men turned, were looking his way; he heard the whispers.

"Marse Robert. It's him, I tell you. It's General Lee."

He caught a glimpse of an officer stepping away from the fire, coming toward him.

No. Not now.

He lifted his reins; just the slightest nudge and Traveler turned, breaking into a slow canter, and he rode into the shadows. Tracing the edge of the pasture, he followed the broken line of the fence for another fifty yards, the ground rising ahead, climbing to a woodlot. At a corner of the field was a towering oak, gnarled, ancient, a remnant of the great forest that had once covered this land, spared by a farmer long ago, perhaps as a reminder of what the land had once been.

No one was about, and he stopped beneath its vast, spreading branches. Atop the knoll the Cumberland Valley spread out before him, a vast arc of farmsteads, villages, and his army, the Army of Northern Virginia. Ten thousand campfires glowed, spreading up and down the length of the valley, great blazing circles of light. Where the more restless had gathered, there was singing and laughing.

He remembered the night before the Battle of Sharpsburg last fall, the way the Union campfires had glowed on the far side of Antietam Creek and the surrounding hills. As he'd ridden to inspect their lines, he had commented to Jackson on the vastness of the Union host descending upon them.

"Won't be as many of their fires tomorrow night," Thomas had replied coldly.

"Thomas is dead." He whispered the words softly, a simple statement of fact that carried so much weight, perhaps the very outcome of the war.

You have lost your left arm, but I have lost my right. That is what he had sent as a message upon hearing of Jackson's wounding last month at Chancellorsville. And then he had died. How I miss that right arm tonight, he thought sadly. If Jackson were here, I would know without a moment's doubt how to react. But all had changed now.

Where was the Union's Army of the Potomac camped tonight? This morning he had thought they were a hundred miles off, still down in northern Virginia and around Washington. An hour ago he had learned the truth.

The Dutchman, his trusted commander of First Corps, Gen. James "Pete" Longstreet, had come to him with a spy. He had never liked spies, though they were as much a part of war as any soldier and at times far more important than having an extra division on the field. The spy was an actor Pete had hired on his own.

That in itself said something, that his second in command had spent a fair sum of money to send an actor across the fields, villages, and towns of Maryland and Pennsylvania in search of the Army of the Potomac. That was a job Jeb Stuart and his cavalry were supposed to perform, not someone who strutted upon the stage.

The Army of the Potomac was coming north. It was not in Washington; it was coming north and moving fast. By tomorrow night its campfires would be lit not thirty miles from here.

Stuart had failed him. Reports should have been flooding in, detailing the movement of every division in the Union army. There had not been a single word. For that matter he couldn't even tell for sure where Stuart was at this moment. There was the other side of the coin as well. If Stuart had failed to report in, he had most likely failed as well in his other task of screening the movement of this army. He had to assume that the Army of the Potomac might indeed know where he was, how his forces were spread out all the way from the Maryland border to Harrisburg ... and just how vulnerable he was.

I should have known three days back that those people were on the march and following, he thought bitterly. Not tonight, not like this, from a spy slipping through the lines to whisper his report, declaiming his lines as if I were part of a breathless audience hanging on every word.

The anger began to flare. "Damn!"

He knew that if those who followed him had heard that single word it would have sent a shock through the entire army. "The Old Man was so angry he swore," they'd whisper. Staff would have stood stock-still in stunned silence; generals noted for their command of Anglo-Saxon would have been rooted in place.

They make me too much a statue of marble, he thought. I have already become a legend to them. Legends can create victory. Convince your men that they can win, convince the enemy they cannot win, and the battle is half decided before the first shot is fired.

He dismounted, loosely holding Traveler's reins so that his old companion lowered his head to crop the rich clover of the pasture. He sat down under the oak tree, a mild groan escaping him as he settled back, resting his head against the rough bark, and he let the reins go.

They're coming North. That means a fight soon, maybe as early as two days from now, definitely within a week. It is, after all, what I wanted, but not quite yet. And not here, not on the Union army's terms.

A shower of sparks swirled up from the nearest campfire as another rail was tossed onto the flames, another song started, "Lorena."

He listened, humming absently.

"The years creep slowly by, Lorena,

"The snow is on the grass again ..."

His wife, Mary, loved that one; so had his daughter Annie, the memory of her stabbing his heart.

"'Tis dust to dust beneath the sod;

"But there, up there, 'tis heart to heart."

Dear Annie, to think of her thus, returning to dust. His youngest daughter dead at twenty-three the winter before. She had gone off to North Carolina to marry, and now she was gone forever.

Only last week a major from a North Carolina regiment had come to his tent, nervous, respectful. He had been home recovering from wounds and just wanted to say that Annie was buried in the churchyard of his village, that the grave was well tended, fresh flowers placed upon it by the local women. The officer had actually choked back tears as he spoke, then saluted as he retired. He thanked the major, closed his tent flap, and silently wept, a rare luxury, to be alone for a few minutes to cry for a lost child before others came, looking for orders, for advice, looking for a commander who could not be seen to weep.

He reached into his breast pocket and pulled out the letter he had been writing to his wife, Mary, until yet again command had interfered, Longstreet arriving with his spy. Though it was dark, he knew the letter by heart already, having labored over it, trying to find just the right tone to still her fears.

My dearest wife,


I take pen in hand praying that this missive finds you well, and that the protection of our blessed Savior rest upon you.


I write to you this evening with news which we must bear calmly. As you know from my last letter our son Rooney was wounded on June 8th in the action at Brandy Station. As I assured you then his injury was not serious; neither bone nor artery was damaged. I stayed with him throughout that night before leaving to embark upon this campaign the following morning. I was just informed this day, however, that Rooney was taken prisoner last week. Captured in the house where he had been resting and has been sent to Fortress Monroe. Thankfully our young Robert, who was tending to him, was able to escape capture and is safely back in our lines.


My dear wife, do not be overly concerned. Though this bitter and terrible struggle has divided our country, it has not severed all bonds of friendship between old comrades nor has it stilled all sentiments of Christian charity. I am certain that friends of old on the other side, upon hearing of our son's plight, will come to his aid and insure his well being and restoration to health.


Though I can ask no special favors, I am certain that our beloved son will soon be listed for exchange and returned safely to our loving embrace.


I know that your prayers are joined with mine for the protection of our son. That we pray, as well, that this campaign shall bring an ending to this bitter conflict.

He folded the letter up, looking back across the valley. No father should be asked to fight a battle into which his own sons must be sent. When first he had seen them carrying Rooney back from the fight, features pale, thigh slashed open, he had feared the worst and nearly lost his composure. And though he was certain that friends would indeed intervene to ensure Rooney's protection, nevertheless there were some who might do him harm. It was obvious that the cavalry raid to capture Rooney had been launched for no other reason than to seize his son.

So far we've managed to keep the deeper darkness at bay, he thought. In most civil wars Rooney would have been hanged, if for no other reason than to bring me pain. We've fought so far with some degree of chivalry, the memories of old comradeship tempering the fury, but for how much longer can we do that? It has to end soon. It has to end; otherwise the rift will become too deep. It has to end as well, he realized, because if not, we will surely lose.

The song "Lorena" ended; a harmonica struck up a jig; some of the men began dancing, the firelight casting cavorting shadows across the pasture.

He wished he could give them another week, better yet two weeks, of this easy campaigning, living off the rich land, fattening up, getting ready for what lay ahead, but Longstreet and his actor had changed all that.

But while he would have preferred another week, he knew, as well, that he was not up here for a leisurely march; ultimately he was here to fight, and this time to fight a battle that would end the war.

That was the plan he had laid out before President Davis a little more than a month ago. It started when Secretary of War Seddon suggested that part of Longstreet's corps be detached and sent west to relieve the besieged city of Vicksburg on the Mississippi. He had gone down to Richmond to meet with President Davis and the cabinet to present a counterproposal to win the war through a decisive victory in the East.

He tried to remember this Grant who was emerging so rapidly as the Union leader in the West and who had been so aggressive in besieging Vicksburg. So many other faces he could recall: comrades of old from Mexico; from the west plains of Texas; from the parade ground at West Point; John Reynolds, who was Commandant of Cadets at the Academy; Winfield Hancock; Fitz John Porter, his old aide-decamp, all now stood against him-and yet he could fondly remember their voices, their laughter, their friendship.

Many of the younger ones had been cadets at the Point when he was superintendent, a memory that burned hard when he read the casualty lists in the Northern papers and saw more than one name from those days, a boy who had come to a Sunday tea at his home, or one whom he had gently chided for a minor infraction and was now dead, in effect killed by him.

Grant, though, was someone he did not know enough to understand and therefore could not second-guess; and if Grant should win at Vicksburg, he knew they'd bring him east. No, it had to end before then.

He had argued against reacting directly to Grant at Vicksburg. By the time they deployed Longstreet west, the fight might very well be over. Besides, that would leave him with less than fifty thousand men, and surely the Army of the Potomac would come swinging in again, especially if they knew that a third of his forces were gone.

No, take the war into the North. Get into the rich farmlands of Pennsylvania to feed his troops, threaten a state capital, perhaps even take it. That would bring the Army of the Potomac out into the open. We then pick the place, lure them in, and finish it.

Up here in Pennsylvania there would be no falling back; it would be a fight in the open, a chance for an Austerlitz, a Waterloo, the two great battles taught at the Point as classic examples of decisive victory. Do that and end it. Such a victory would leave Washington open for the taking, could perhaps even swing England and France to our side and end the war before winter.

Such a thing, however, required the crucial first step, another slaughtering match with the Army of the Potomac.

Continues...


Excerpted from Gettysburg by Newt Gingrich William R. Forstchen and Albert S. Hanser Copyright © 2003 by Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen
Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 50 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(27)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(6)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    History told differently

    This series (there are 3 books) tells of how history may of turned if Lee had acted on Longstreet's suggestions of going around the Union army during the Gettysburg campaign. This books starts with the actual history and then statrs the turn down the other possible track. If you are interested in a good story that could have shown a different road to the civil war then this is the series for you

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    Read all three books. Very interesting analysis of the politics and decisions that happened during the Civil War.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2005

    Excellent Read

    The authors do an excellent job changing one decision made by Lee and seeing the battle through to a very probably conclusion. The charactors are brought to life, and even if your loyalties lie with one sie or the other, you find yourself identifying with individuals on both sides of the battle. Very realisitic and well done. A must read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2004

    Fiction - Non-fiction blurs.

    I found a very plausible alternative to Gettysburg. I loved the characters, the fundamental possibilities, and the detail the authors went into. They put me in the trenches along side the likes of Longstreet, Lee, Meade, and especially Henry Hunt, who, In my opinion, plays an important, colorful character. Having studied Gettysburg myself several times, I found myself immersed in the 'did or did not' really happen syndrome, blurring history in my mind. I found the character development superb. I highly recommend.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 20, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    What if Pickett did not charge?

    In this novel Lee listens to Longstreet and decides against sending Pickett against the Federal lines- from that point on history takes a new turn and the tide of the war changes. A must read for Civil War buffs. The fairness and evenhandedness to both sides is striking.Really enjoyable!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2003

    A Real Eye-Opener

    When Newt Gingrich and Bill Forstchen created Gettysburg: A Novel of the Civil War, they created a spectacular illustration of alternative history.Gettysburg: A Novel of the Civil War is a great eye-opener for understanding how one change in the sequence of events could could alter the entire outcome of the Civil War. Whether you are a Civil War buff or not, I highly recommend reading Gettysburg: A Novel of the Civil War, by Newt Gingrich and Bill Forstchen.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2004

    Great Book

    I Could not put this book down. Most Civl War book have some dry chapters but, not this book I enjoyed the whole thing

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    this is the only book I read so far in this series. Very good bo

    this is the only book I read so far in this series. Very good book .Really interesting on how many people died in the battles up to Gettysburg.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2012

    The north did win

    Idiot below the north won this battle then lee retreated and surrendered to teh north duh little idiot

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2012

    Not recommend

    Thoght I'd be reading a factual story of the battle of Gettysburg
    however everything I've read thus far said the north won the battle
    and not the south.
    Didn't know Col. Chamberland(?) was taken as prisoner. I understood
    he and his men were a large part of the winning of the battle.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2011

    Amazing

    It amazilll...
    ...






    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    Gettysburg

    I enjoy the book, When I first start reading it, it sound like a John Wayne classic but after I got into it. It really got me interested.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2009

    See 3/9/09 anonymous review of "Never Call Retreat"

    See 3/9/09 anonymous review of "Never Call Retreat"

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2007

    Too Far Out

    Try as I might, I could not get past the first chapter. Even for a 'what if', it was too far out in left field. The only thing it had going for it was the recognizable name of Newt Gingrich on the front cover. I found it to be too one-sided in perspective.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2004

    A must read for any civil war buff!

    A great book for any civil war buff shows what would have probably happened had Lee listened to Longstreet at Gettysburg.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2004

    You're right there!

    The fiction format brings events to life. Lee know this battle was do or die. As for the 'implausable scenario' reviewer who said Lee would not have made these mistakes - Lee lost the real-life battle. Right?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2004

    Implausible scenario

    Anyone who has been to the Gettysburg battlefield knows that the terrain is too open for Lee to surprise Meade with a bold move to the south. By comparison the ground and vegetation around Bull Run (Manassas) provided more concealment to maneuver a Corps. Also Lee fought both Bull Run battles early in the war when untested and inexperienced generals led the Army of the Potomac. By the summer of 1863 poor generals like Burnside and McClellan had been relieved of command. It would be foolish for Lee to move or split the Army of Northern Virginia in plain site of a seasoned and well lead Army of the Potomac.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2004

    Outstanding Characterizations

    This is a great book that captures the personal interaction that is at the center of all human drama in war. Most books on the CW never get the characters right. They are cardboard cutouts. Here, the characters live. You understand their motivations, they fears, their decision processes and the pressures they faced in committing so many soldiers to certain death. I loved the book. Can't wait for the next two. And as a southern born and bred, I hope they will tell Lincoln's story as well as they have told Lee's, Mead's, Sickles, and Longstreet's.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2004

    Great Book

    This was an excellent book. To finally see Lee realize that Longstreets plan of action to flank the AOP to the south and east and cut them off from Westminster, Baltimore and Washington was wonderful. This book is well written and masterfully put together, I was unable to put this book down! A great read. Second only to The Killer Angels as my favorite fictional history of Gettysburg book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2003

    When things go wrong they really go wrong!

    This book reminded me that history can go either way, so what if? In the 'civil war' neither side really won.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)