Ghetto Cowboy

Ghetto Cowboy

4.3 10
by G. Neri, Jesse Joshua Watson
     
 

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A street-smart tale about a displaced teen who learns to defend what's right-the Cowboy Way.  See more details below

Overview

A street-smart tale about a displaced teen who learns to defend what's right-the Cowboy Way.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Ann McDuffie
The mean streets of Philly are the last place Cole expects to see horses and cowboys, but that is exactly what he stumbles upon. Back in Detroit, Cole goofed off and skipped school one too many times, so his single mother dumps him off with the father he has never met. Harper is part of a group that rescues abandoned race horses, animals who would otherwise be slaughtered for dog food. Cole also feels abandoned and only wants to ditch these ghetto cowboys and get home. As he reluctantly begins to shovel muck and avoid getting stomped on, Cole connects with a skittish horse named Boo and begins to appreciate the "cowboy way." Though the stables provide a positive environment for boys in the ?hood, it has troubles of its own. When the city threatens to shut it down and confiscate the horses, Cole and his friends step up and fight back. Short chapters, realistic dialogue, and just enough action make this book easily accessible to reluctant middle-school readers. The audience will care about the characters and the real-life family problems, which are handled in a positive light. Real emotion grabs the reader as Cole's mother leaves him and later when he reconnects with Harper, who is a local legend on horseback. Inspired by little-known black urban horsemen of Philadelphia and Brooklyn, who use horses to keep young men off the streets and maintain the cowboy tradition, this is mild urban fiction without the guns and drugs. Reviewer: Ann McDuffie
Children's Literature - Jackie Fulton
Who ever heard of a black cowboy living in Philadelphia? Until recently twelve year old Cole from Detroit had never even seen a horse in person much less black cowboys and city stables. That is until he got into more trouble than his mother could handle and she dumped him with Harper, his estranged cowboy father, in inner city Philadelphia. Until he finds a way back home to Detroit, Cole is forced to earn his keep by helping around the stables. Actually, most of Cole's time is spent trying to avoid getting stomped by the horses and listening to the old timer named Tex talk about the Cowboy Way. At first Cole finds the whole cowboy thing strange. After all, Cole is a city kid—until he meets an unbroken horse named Boo who changes his mind. Just when Cole starts to think that the Cowboy Way doesn't sound so bad after all tragedy strikes at the stables and Cole is the only one who can help. At the worst possible time the city arrives for an inspection and declares the horses' living conditions uninhabitable and threatens to demolish the stables. Now Cole has to do something he never imagined: save the Cowboy Way from becoming a thing of the past. An Author's note at the end reveals that Neri's engaging story of community and friendship is based on the real inner city horsemen of North Philadelphia and Brooklyn-Queens who continue to serve their communities and keep young people off the streets. Black and white illustrations allow the reader to identify even further with the well-developed characters. Reviewer: Jackie Fulton
From the Publisher
A fascinating glimpse of a culture most readers will not have heard of.
—Kirkus Reviews

Neri's story is original in theme and inspirational in tone and content.
—Booklist

School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—Cole has been skipping school so much that he might have to repeat seventh grade. His fed-up mom drives him from Detroit to North Philadelphia to live with the father he's never met. Feeling abandoned, Cole at first struggles to get along with his father. But eventually his dad's vocation as a horse-whispering cowboy—he runs a stable in the inner city, which is a safe haven for local kids—gives them a chance to connect. Cole learns the history of black horsemen and how to live the "Cowboy Way," befriending a horse of his own and joining a fight to save the stable when it's threatened by the city. This well-written book is based on a true story of urban cowboys in Philadelphia and New York. Cole's spot-on emotional insight is conveyed through believable dialogue and the well-paced plot offers information about a little-known aspect of African-American history as well as a portrait of contemporary urban stable life. Watson's illustrations punctuate the intriguing aspects of the story and make the novel more appealing.—Shawna Sherman, Hayward Public Library, CA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763649227
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
08/09/2011
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
935,964
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.90(d)
Lexile:
660L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
A fascinating glimpse of a culture most readers will not have heard of.
—Kirkus Reviews

Neri's story is original in theme and inspirational in tone and content.
—Booklist

Meet the Author

G. Neri is the winner of a 2011 Coretta Scott King Author Honor Award for his graphic novel YUMMY and the 2010 Lee Bennett Hopkins Promising Poet Award for CHESS RUMBLE, a middlegrade novel in verse with illustrations by Jesse Joshua Watson. G. Neri lives in Tampa, Florida.

Jesse Joshua Watson is the illustrator of Chess Rumble by G. Neri and I and I by Tony Medina. He is also the author-illustrator of Hope for Haiti. Jesse Joshua Watson lives in Washington State.

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Ghetto Cowboy 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As soon as I saw this book, it caught my attention! Since I am black, this made me feel a lot more confident about our culture and how it is ok to mix with different things. Again, I didnt read it yet, but so far it's worth a million. :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pretty good so far
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is this book good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was puzzled with this book i did not understand it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is this worth $10.39. Reply with your headline saying Re. To question.u
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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