Ghosts of Manhattan

Ghosts of Manhattan

3.7 12
by George Mann
     
 

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1926. New York. The Roaring Twenties. Jazz. Flappers. Prohibition. Coal-powered cars. A cold war with a British Empire that still covers half of the globe. Yet things have developed differently from established history. America is in the midst of a cold war with a British Empire that has only just buried Queen Victoria, her life artificially preserved to the age of

Overview

1926. New York. The Roaring Twenties. Jazz. Flappers. Prohibition. Coal-powered cars. A cold war with a British Empire that still covers half of the globe. Yet things have developed differently from established history. America is in the midst of a cold war with a British Empire that has only just buried Queen Victoria, her life artificially preserved to the age of 107. Coal-powered cars roar along roads thick with pedestrians, biplanes take off from standing with primitive rocket boosters, and monsters lurk behind closed doors and around every corner. This is a time in need of heroes. It is a time for The Ghost.

A series of targeted murders are occurring all over the city, the victims found with ancient Roman coins placed on their eyelids after death. The trail appears to lead to a group of Italian-American gangsters and their boss, who the mobsters have dubbed 'The Roman'. However, as The Ghost soon discovers, there is more to The Roman than at first appears, and more bizarre happenings that he soon links to the man, including moss-golems posing as mobsters and a plot to bring an ancient pagan god into the physical world in a cavern beneath the city.

As The Ghost draws nearer to The Roman and the center of his dangerous web, he must battle with foes both physical and supernatural and call on help from the most unexpected of quarters if he is to stop The Roman and halt the imminent destruction of the city.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Mann (The Affinity Bridge) combines the trendy superhero and steampunk genres, but his cardboard characters and laughable dialogue (“I had never loved, until I loved you”) never attain even the level of parody. In an alternate 1927 Manhattan, a deadly vigilante nicknamed the Ghost stalks the city, attacking the employees of the Roman, a mysterious mobster. The Roman's men have been committing horrific acts of violence, drawing the attention of police detective Felix Donovan. Also dragged into the plot are carefree playboy Gabriel and his lover, Celeste, who seems to exist solely to sleep with the hero and then be sacrificed to move the plot along. The action sequences are solid, though excessively gory, but there's little that comic fans haven't seen done more impressively a dozen times before. (Apr.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781616143428
Publisher:
Prometheus Books
Publication date:
10/04/2010
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
278,004
File size:
901 KB

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“The lessons learned in Making Yourself Indispensible take the mystery out of accountability by not only providing a foundational language for practicing accountability, but a complete road map as well. It has been my personal experience that by applying these principles across an organization, people do transform, ultimately leading to more accountable individuals, teams, and organizations with improved business results.”

Meet the Author

George Mann is the author of The Affinity Bridge, The Osiris Ritual and The Human Abstract, as well as numerous short stories, novellas and an original Doctor Who audiobook. He has edited a number of anthologies including The Solaris Book of New Science Fiction, The Solaris Book of New Fantasy and a retrospective collection of classic Sexton Blake stories, Sexton Blake, Detective. He lives near Grantham, UK, with his wife, son and daughter. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/George_Mann.

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Ghosts of Manhattan 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1926 Queen Victoria has just died but the Cold War between her kingdom and America remains heated. Violence in the big cities of the United States is rampant as the Twenties are Roaring with murders. In that wake the Ghost walks the city streets of Manhattan with a vengeance. He kills people employed by mobster Roman whose Italian-American gang is particularly known for their brutality and violence. The vigilante's calling card is an ancient Roman coin left on the eyes of those he murders. Police detective Felix Donovan is well aware of the Roman mob and the vigilante who stalks them. Each in his belief are criminals. However, though he would prefer to bring Roman and the Ghost to justice, he makes little headway. Meanwhile as the Ghost closes in on Roman, the vigilante learns first hand his adversary is using paranormal connections and fears the end game is to bring a deadly God into the city. Although comic book gory over the top of the Empire State Building, Ghosts of Manhattan is an entertaining superhero steampunk fantasy that will remind the audience of Darkman. The story line is fast-paced from the moment the Ghost stalks Roman's legion and never slows down until the climax with half of Manhattan at stake. Although the plot never quite decides between lampooning the two sub-genres and action thriller, readers will enjoy the High Noon over New York war between the vigilante and the mobster with eerie connections. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dawson59 More than 1 year ago
It's okay. This is my first Steampunk novel by a rather well known author and writer. When I started the novel I was totally captivated with the first chapter, and then, well, then the story continued. Maybe I should have stopped after the good stuff. The plot is intriguing to say the least. We have Gabriel Cross masquerading round Manhattan as a true life crime fighter known as the Ghost. He is trying to run down the current mob boss, "The Roman," who is killing off many affluent and prominent citizens in the most diabolical methods known to man. Some of these parts are to say, gruesome. Not for the faint of heart. The Ghost unwillingly teams up with a local Inspector, Donovan, in an effort to bring "The Roman" and his right hand man Reece into custody and off the streets. A very promising premise indeed. However, the story falls flat in its excessive use of describing how one smokes a cigarette, the over indulgence of using the name "The Ghost" even after we know who it is and then the action scenes. This is where is goes way, way over the top. I don't know any superhero who could have possibly been inflicted with so many wounds and never missed a beat. I enjoy action scenes (by humans) that a believable. These were not. And that brings up his counterpart Inspector Donovan. The man takes a bullet in his shoulder which shatters the bone and muscle, yet he can still cook breakfast, fire a sidearm and drive a car with little difficulty. Give me a break. Suspense is one thing, ludicrous is another. Overall, one must appreciate the detail of scene descriptions and the handling of dialog between characters. I found this entertaining and smooth. Yet, in the end, not a great work and I'm thinking of reading the next two in the series, with reservations.
VoraciousReaderSH More than 1 year ago
Ghosts of Manhattan and Ghosts of War, by David Mann, are among my favorites of the still developing Steampunk literary world. Simple stories with great characters and infernal devices, very entertaining reads!
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The_Book_Rack More than 1 year ago
A good read, reminding one of 30's & 40's pulps, akin to The Shadow and the Spider, etc, but on the steampunk side. Plus the ending crossed over into the SciFi world of things. That's all I'll say there, so as not to give away the ending. Our hero has a more human touch in this though, but is associated with the 'upper-crust' of society. I eventually plan to read the sequel to this: Ghosts Of War. It seems as if George Mann is taking pulps, 40's detectives, and steampunk, and trying to combine them all in one. He does a decent job of it. 3 stars out of 5.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great super hero novel