Giant Monster by Steve Niles, Nat Jones |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Giant Monster

Giant Monster

3.0 2
by Steve Niles, Nat Jones
     
 

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The ultimate giant monster horror story from the writer-creator of the smash-hit vampire epic 30 DAYS OF NIGHT.

The ultimate giant monster story from Steve Niles, writer-creator of the smash-hit vampire epic 30 DAY OF NIGHT. The year is 2013. Astronaut Don Maggert's forst space flight swallows him alive in the grip of an intergalactic horror, tranforming him into

Overview

The ultimate giant monster horror story from the writer-creator of the smash-hit vampire epic 30 DAYS OF NIGHT.

The ultimate giant monster story from Steve Niles, writer-creator of the smash-hit vampire epic 30 DAY OF NIGHT. The year is 2013. Astronaut Don Maggert's forst space flight swallows him alive in the grip of an intergalactic horror, tranforming him into something that throws the entire planet into peril! Featuring oversized Kaiju action and giant monster throws-down!

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—An over-the-top valentine to pulps and B-movies, this comic is intended to be a gruesome romp through a number of classic horror and action tropes. Originally published as two 48-page issues, it is rounded out with a reproduction of the script for the first half of the story. Astronaut Don Maggart is infected with a mysterious substance on his reentry to Earth and transforms into a hungry monstrosity, increasing in size and strength as he consumes first rescuers, then his wife, then civilians by the handful. A retired Nazi scientist reveals his Super-Attack-Bot project to stop Maggart's rampage, and massive carnage ensues. The artwork has a lumpy, organic quality that lends itself to the blood-and-guts violence that becomes the prime focus of the comic as it largely abandons story and even suspense over time. It can't quite abandon the characters, though, as they were never properly established in the first place, instead filling roles with functional efficiency. Still, the book provides a quick, wicked dose of pulpy ultra-violence with just enough self-awareness for those looking for a veneer of higher-order thinking or critical commentary.—Benjamin Russell, Belmont High School, NH

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781608860029
Publisher:
BOOM! Studios
Publication date:
03/23/2010
Series:
Giant Monster Series
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
13 Years

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Giant Monster 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ChandlerSwain More than 1 year ago
"Giant Monster" is the latest graphic novel piece of nihilism brought to you from the American Comics Industry. This book, created by writer Steve Niles and artist Nat Jones, concerns an astronaut who upon his solo return space shuttle flight from an international space station encounters an alien parasite, absorbs him and crashes the shuttle into the Pacific. Presumed dead, his body is reenergized by the alien force and he begins to grow rapidly and exponentially and also eats everything and everyone in sight. The prerequisite guns have no effect of the beast (who would've thought since by this time he's the size of the Chrysler Building?) and so General Gorgos (get the clever reference?) consults an ex-Nazi Dr. Strangelove wannabe who provides a weapon in the form of an equally giant Aryan Robot-Weapon complete with shoulder pad swastikas. They clash. They both die...or do they? This is an extremely tiresome tale told with stilted writing and 'fridge level art begging the question: just who is this for? Certainly the self-congratulatory referencing to every Toho kaiju (great creature) film ever made as well as retro VHS trash like "Hideous Sun Demon" stands out like a flare in an outhouse, but there is no reason for the references except for, well...lack of originality. And the gleefully abundant gore is hard to excuse. Clearly the creators have a whale of a time ripping out eyes, chomping divers in half (shades of "Lake Placid"!) and causing constant blood spraying mayhem, but to what end? Even the referencing of nazis and swastikas is too mean-spirited and pointless to have a satiric context (surely the creators don't think it's a point of honor to unearth an obscure, unseen film like "Dr. Strangelove", or do they?). To add insult to injury, the book is padded with extra pages of the original script outline to the comic, which adds no new insight to a fruitless scenario, only heft.