Gift for Meg (Portraits of Little Women)

Gift for Meg (Portraits of Little Women)

by Susan Beth Pfeffer
     
 

About the Author: Award-winning author Susan Beth Pfeffer, has written over sixty books for children and young adults. She began her career in 1970, with the publication of her first book, Just Morgan, which she wrote her last semester at New York University.


Ms. Pfeffer's books include middle-grade novels (The Pizza Puzzle),

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Overview

About the Author: Award-winning author Susan Beth Pfeffer, has written over sixty books for children and young adults. She began her career in 1970, with the publication of her first book, Just Morgan, which she wrote her last semester at New York University.


Ms. Pfeffer's books include middle-grade novels (The Pizza Puzzle), historical fiction (Nobody's Daughter and its companion volume Justice for Emily), and young adult novels (Family of Strangers and Twice Taken). Her young adult novel About David was awarded the South Carolina Young Adult Book Award.


Her young adult novel The Year Without Michael, an ALA Best Book for Young Adults and winner of the South Carolina Young Adult Book Award, was named by the American Library Association as one of the hundred best books for teenagers written between 1968-1993.


Susan Beth Pfeffer is also the author of the popular Portraits of Little Women series. Created for readers grades 3-6, each of the books in the series captures one of the beloved March sisters from Little Women--Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy--at age 10. These unforgettable heroines experience the joys and sorrows of sisterhood, family life, and a changing America.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385326704
Publisher:
Bantam Doubleday Dell Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
06/08/1999
Series:
Portraits of Little Women Series
Pages:
93
Product dimensions:
5.18(w) x 7.32(h) x 0.58(d)
Lexile:
580L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

Meet the Author

Award-winning author Susan Beth Pfeffer, has written over sixty books for children and young adults. She began her career in 1970, with the publication of her first book, Just Morgan, which she wrote her last semester at New York University.

Ms. Pfeffer's books include middle-grade novels (The Pizza Puzzle), historical fiction (Nobody's Daughter and its companion volume Justice for Emily), and young adult novels (Family of Strangers and Twice Taken). Her young adult novel About David was awarded the South Carolina Young Adult Book Award.

Her young adult novel The Year Without Michael, an ALA Best Book for Young Adults and winner of the South Carolina Young Adult Book Award, was named by the American Library Association as one of the hundred best books for teenagers written between 1968-1993.

Susan Beth Pfeffer is also the author of the popular Portraits of Little Women series. Created for readers grades 3-6, each of the books in the series captures one of the beloved March sisters from Little Women--Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy--at age 10. These unforgettable heroines experience the joys and sorrows of sisterhood, family life, and a changing America.

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Read an Excerpt

"Now, girls," Marmee said as she straightened Jo's collar and Beth's pinafore. "Be sure to listen politely to all of Aunt March's stories. Travel is very educational, and I'm sure there's a lot we can learn from what Aunt March will tell us."

Meg sighed. Aunt March was back from an extended trip to Europe, and whenever she returned from such a trip, she was full of stories for Father, Marmee, Meg, and her sisters.

Meg knew that Jo, who usually avoided Aunt March, always enjoyed the stories, probably because Jo yearned to travel as well. The stories allowed her to imagine that she was seeing all those grand sights herself.

Taking a quick look at Beth, Meg doubted that Beth found Aunt March anything other than terrifying. But Beth was too sweet to make a fuss. She listened to Aunt March and at least managed to seem entertained.

Amy, Meg's youngest sister, loved to hear anything about society. Since Aunt March stayed at the best hotels and occasionally met dukes and earls, Meg knew Amy was quite thrilled to listen to Aunt March ramble on.

As for Marmee, Meg was aware that her mother often found Aunt March tedious, but Marmee also loved new knowledge and appreciated learning all that Aunt March had to teach them about European cities and their famous sights.

That left only Meg, since Father was away that afternoon at a meeting. And only Meg wanted to be someplace, anyplace, else, rather than have to endure another of Aunt March's reminiscences.

Meg supposed someday she might travel, and no doubt would on her honeymoon trip. But if her husband, whoever he might turn out to be, had no money for fancy trips, that was fine with Meg too. Shewanted nothing more than a little cottage filled with happy children. If she could be half as contented as Marmee, Meg knew she'd be a lucky woman indeed.

Meg laughed at herself. How silly to be thinking about such a far-off life. She was only ten years old.

"You can laugh?" Jo asked. "With Aunt March on her way?"

"Jo," Marmee said. "Meg, what did you find so funny?"

"It was nothing, Marmee," Meg said. She knew her sisters wouldn't laugh at her if she told them what she'd been thinking about, but still, it was a private thought and not one she cared to share. Jo had no such fantasies about husbands and babies. Her dreams were far grander. Beth craved only the quiet of her daily life, and Amy daydreamed of nothing less than a duke of her own.

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